Narrative Text: Evidence In narratives…



Download 40.59 Kb.
Date conversion04.05.2016
Size40.59 Kb.

  1. Narrative Text: Evidence

In narratives…

Types of lenses

Possible Questions/Noticings:

What does the author want me to understand?

What role does the character(s) play in the text?

Why did the character act that way?




What characters/people:

  • say/think/do

  • Characters' expressions, gestures, and appearance

  • Relationships

  • Setting

  • Time period

  • Recurring objects




Types of patterns

  • Which details fit together?

  • How they fit together?

Types of understanding

Character’s/people’s:

  • Feelings

  • Traits

  • Relationships

  • Motivations

  • Comparisons to other

Whole text:

  • Issues

  • Symbols/metaphors/motifs

  • Themes

  • Lessons (central message; lessons learned)

  1. Narrative Text: Word Choice

In narratives…

Types of lenses

Possible Questions/Noticings:

Are there any hard or important words?

Why did the author use that particular word?

What words jump out right away?




Choose words that seem particularly selected by the author such as:

  • Words that evoke:

  • strong emotions

  • strong images

  • a clear idea

  • Words that reveal style:

  • Particular kinds of words:

  • nouns

  • verbs

  • adjectives

  • adverbs

Types of patterns

  • Which details fit together

  • How they fit together

Types of understanding

An author’s

  • Tone

  • Purpose

  • Relationship/theme

Text’s:

  • Central ideas

  • Issues and Lessons

  • Symbols/metaphors/motifs

  • Themes

Planning Support for

Close Reading

2.Narrative Text: Word Choice

Anchor Standards

Standard 1: Read closely to determine what the text says explicitly and to make logical inferences from it; cite specific textual evidence when writing or speaking to support conclusions drawn from the text.

Standard 4: Interpret words and phrases as they are used in a text, including determining technical, connotative, and figurative meanings, and analyze how specific word choices shape meaning or tone.

Adapted from Falling in Love with Close Reading, Lehman & Roberts, 2014




Planning Support for Close Reading

  1. Narrative Text: Evidence

Anchor Standards for Reading

Standard 1: Read closely to determine what the text says explicitly and to make logical inferences from it; cite specific textual evidence when writing or speaking to support conclusions drawn from the text.

Standard 4: Interpret words and phrases as they are used in a text, including determining technical, connotative, and figurative meanings, and analyze how specific word choices shape meaning or tone.

Standard 6: Assess how point of view or purpose shapes the content and style of a text.

Adapted from Falling in Love with Close Reading, Lehman & Roberts, 2014




3.Narrative Text: Structure

In narratives…

Types of lenses

Possible questions/Noticings:

Why might this memory be important (for flashbacks)

What is being compared? (comparisons)

Why does this keep happening again & again?

Where is the narrator talking?

Where are the parts of the story where the characters are talking?




Lens #1: Describe the organization of the text:

Genre as structure chosen for a purpose:

  • Fantasy, to explore good and evil

  • Historical fiction, to reflect on current ideas in a historical context

Location of parts within the whole:

  • Plot mountain:

-Exposition: introducing character, setting , and backstory

-Rising Action: pressures and obstacles

-Climax: dramatic point, characters or problems come together

-Falling Action: characters or communities change, lessons learned

-Resolution: ending, some things wrap up, others might not

Techniques the author uses:


  • Descriptions

  • Dialogue between characters

  • Action

  • Setting

  • Inner thinking

  • Scene endings and beginning

  • Flashbacks

  • Definitions of a term

  • Comparisons

Lens #2: Purpose of that organization:

  • To set the stage

  • To reveal

  • To create suspense

  • To foreshadow

Types of patterns

  • How are the parts similar?

  • How are the parts different?

  • What purpose do the parts serve?

Types of understanding

Character:

  • Development

  • Changes

  • Critical movements

Whole text:

  • Themes

  • Central ideas

  • Issues and Lessons

  • Symbols/ metaphors/ motifs

  • Author’s purpose

4.Narrative Text: Point of View and Argument

In narratives…

Types of lenses

Possible questions/Noticings:

What stands out in the text?

How does the dialogue reflect the character’s/author’s perspective or thinking?

Why does this character/author have this point of view?




Lens #1: What is the author’s and/or character’s point of view here?

  • What are they thinking

  • What they believe

  • What they feel or want

Lens #2: What makes the author and/or character’s point of view persuasive?

  • Text evidence

  • Word choice

  • Structure

  • What characters say/think/do

  • Character expressions, gestures, and appearance

  • Relationships

  • Setting descriptions

  • Time period

  • Recurring objects

Types of patterns

  • Which points of view/ideas are repeated

  • What technique does the author use to make his or her point of view/argument

  • What sticks out as different unusual in the text?

Types of understanding

What is the purpose or effect of these points of view?

  • What is revealed about a theme?

  • The author’s purpose?

  • The effect on the reader?

  • Which point of view is rewarded in the text?

  • Comparison of pints of view




Planning Support for

Close Reading

4.Narrative Text:

Point of View and Argument

Anchor Standards

Standard 1: Read closely to determine what the text says explicitly and to make logical inferences from it; cite specific textual evidence when writing or speaking to support conclusions drawn from the text.

Standard 4: Interpret words and phrases as they are used in a text, including determining technical, connotative, and figurative meanings, and analyze how specific word choices shape meaning or tone.

Standard 6: Assess how point of view or purpose shapes the content and style of a text.

Adapted from Falling in Love with Close Reading, Lehman & Roberts, 2014


Planning Support for

Close Reading

3.Narrative Text: Structure



Anchor Standards

Standard 1: Read closely to determine what the text says explicitly and to make logical inferences from it; cite specific textual evidence when writing or speaking to support conclusions drawn from the text.

Standard 5: Analyze the structure of texts, including how specific sentences, paragraphs, and larger portions of the text (e.g., a section, chapter, scene, or stanza) relate to each other and the whole.

Adapted from Falling in Love with Close Reading, Lehman & Roberts, 2014





5.Narrative Texts: Reading Across Texts

In narratives…

Types of lenses

Possible Questions/Noticings:

What similarities do you notice in these texts? Do they share a point of view, theme, or idea?

Are there similarities in the characters?

How does that help me form my own understanding?




Lens #1: Choose a comparison:

  • Characters or subjects

  • Themes or central ideas

  • Settings

  • Authors (texts by the same author or different author)

  • Genres

  • Styles

  • Other ways (awards won, time period, social issues, etc.)

Lens #2: Then choose your texts:

  • What other text fits with this chosen comparison?

- Some students may find it helpful to flip these steps.

Types of patterns

Decide how to compare:

  • Text evidence

  • Word choice

  • Structure

  • Point of view

Types of understanding

Have new ideas about:

  • The lens you looked through

  • The authors’ choices

  • The messages these texts send

  • See characters or subjects as more complex

  • Analyze kinds of relationships between characters or ideas in texts

  • Theme or central idea

When considering author’s purpose:

  • Analyze each author’s point of view

  • Understand more of an author’s style

  • See how genre choices affect story, topic, or readers

  • Examine what it takes to be an “award-winning” book

  • Analyze what texts from a time period show us about that period in history



Blank

Blank



Planning Support for Close Reading

5.Narrative Text: Reading Across Texts



Anchor Standards

Standard 1: Read closely to determine what the text says explicitly and to make logical inferences from it; cite specific textual evidence when writing or speaking to support conclusions drawn from the text.

Standard 9: Analyze how two or more texts address similar themes or topics in order to build knowledge or to compare the approaches the authors take.

Adapted from Falling in Love with Close Reading, Lehman & Roberts, 2014




The database is protected by copyright ©essaydocs.org 2016
send message

    Main page