My family, my home culture doe standards



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LESSON PLAN #1

MY FAMILY, MY HOME CULTURE
DOE STANDARDS
Social Studies:

Standard 3: History: PRE-CONTACT HAWAII HISTORY-Understand the people, events, problems, and ideas that were significant in pre-contact Hawaiian history. SS.4.3.3
Standard 6: Cultural Anthropology: SYSTEMS, DYNAMICS, AND INQUIRY-Understand culture as a system of beliefs, knowledge, and practices shared by a group and understand how cultural systems change over time. SS.4.6.1
Language Arts:

Standard 4: Writing: CONVENTIONS AND SKILLS: Use the writing process and conventions of language and research to construct meaning and communicate effectively for a variety of purposes and audiences using a range of forms.

Standard 6: Oral Communication: CONVENTIONS AND SKILLS: Apply knowledge of verbal and nonverbal language to communicate effectively in various situations: interpersonal, group, and public: for a variety of purposes. LA.4.6.1, 4.6.2, 4.6.3, 4.6.4, 4.6.5, 4.6.6, 4.6.7, 4.6.8

DOE GENERAL LEARNER OUTCOMES


  • Self-directed Learner (The ability to be responsible for one’s own learning)

  • Community Contributor (Understanding that it is essential for human beings to work together)

  • Complex Thinker (The ability to demonstrate critical thinking and problem solving)

  • Quality Producer (The ability to recognize and produce quality performance and products)

  • Effective Communicator (The ability to communicate effectively)



NATIVE HAWAIIAN GUIDELINES
Ike Mauli Lāhui (Cultural Identity Pathway) We envision generations who walk into the future with confidence in their cultural identity and a commitment of service to akua, ‘āina, and each other. Perpetuating Native Hawaiian cultural identity through practices that strengthen knowledge of language, culture and genealogical connections to akua, ‘āina and kanaka
Ike Piko‘u (Personal Connection Pathway) We envision generations whose actions reflect personal identity that is kūpono .Promoting personal growth, development and self-worth to support a greater sense of belonging, compassion and service toward one’s self, family and community.
Ike Honua (Sense of Place Pathway) We envision generations who accept kuleana for our honua. Demonstrating a strong sense of place, including a commitment to preserve the delicate balance of life and protect it for generations to come
Ike Kuana ‘Ike (Worldview Pathway) We envision generations who flourish and inspire local and global communities through a culturally Hawaiian perspective that honors all things— past, present and future. Providing a solid grounding in the Hawaiian worldview that promotes contributions to local and global communities

Ike Pilina (Relationship Pathway) We envision generations that have respectful, responsible, and strong relationships in service to akua, āina, and each other. Nurturing respectful and responsible relationships that connect us to akua, ‘āina, and each other through the sharing of history, genealogy, language and culture



HAWAIIAN VALUES


Guiding Principle

Meaning

Pronunciation

‘Ohana

Family

oh hah nah

Lōkahi

Unity

loh kah hee

Hana Like

Working Together

hah nah lee kay



Students Will:

  • Interview family members to gather information about their family background.

  • Recite their family genealogy in the Hawaiian language or English.

  • Share family cultural practices, traditions and events.

  • Learn about similarities and differences between cultures.


Materials:

  • Pair share worksheet (PS 1)

  • Poster boards

  • Colors, marking pens, colored pencils

  • Mo’oku’auhau/Genealogy worksheet

  • Proverb worksheets

  • Index cards - 4 per student



SUGGESTED ACTIVITIES / PROCEDURES

Materials & Notes

`ŌLELO NO’EAU: See lesson





ACTIVITY 1: Engage students in a discussion about their interests and what makes their family special. Ask students to think about some practices, traditions, activities and events their families do.

  • Have students pair-share their thoughts on the following:(see PS 1)

  • Who are the members that make a family?

  • Who are the people in your family?

  • What are some things you like to do as a family?

  • Can you name your ethnicities?

  • Which ethnicity does your family mostly identify with?

  • What types of cultural practices does your family enjoy doing? (I.e: hula, oli, Obon dance, taiko drumming, fishing, pounding poi, culture based arts and crafts, Chinese New Year fireworks, etc.)

  • As a class, make a prior knowledge chart of customs and traditions that their families and different ethnic groups practice in Hawai‘i.


Homework:

  • Draw one or more pictures of at least 3 cultural practices, activities, special events and traditions your family enjoys doing together.

  • Write a short description of your illustrations.


Culminating project:

  • Students share their pictures with their pair-share partner. Partners discuss and write (using a Venn diagram) the differences and similarities of their pictures.

  • Each student then writes a short essay on the similarities and differences about the cultural practices and traditions of partners




Pair Share worksheet (PS1)

This culminating project could be done as partners or as a class.

Creating a class book or bulletin board is suggested.

ACTIVITY 2:  Students will begin to review the definitions and pronunciations of Hawaiian words that will be used in activity 3. Each student will create a genealogy poster using photos or drawings of immediate or extended family members. 
Vocabulary: Review the pronunciation and meanings of the words below that are used on the Mo’oku’auhanu/Genealogy worksheet.
Kane- man (kah nay)

Wahine- woman (wah he nay)

Hānau- born (hah now)

Noho- to live with (no ho)




  • Have students make picture cards with the word, pronunciation, and a drawing on each card.

  • Distribute and review: mo`oku`auhau/genealogy worksheets.

  • Go over the pronunciation and vocabulary on the worksheets with students. 


Homework:

  • Have students use their mo’oku’auhau/genealogy worksheets to interview and gather information from family members. Teacher should go over explanation of how to interview if needed (students who do not live with their biological parent may interview someone who they feel close to).

  • Send a letter home asking parents if they could send copies of family photos that could be used on a poster; let parents know that pictures will be glued or taped to a poster board.


Culminating project:

  • Student can now make their poster picture genealogy, using the information and pictures.  It will be up to the teacher to allow students their own creativity or to use a standard format for their poster.

  • Teacher: Create a rubric stating your guidelines and format.




Index cards, colors, marking pens, colored pencils

Teacher’s who may have difficulty with Hawaiian words may use the English translations or can ask students to help with pronunciation.

Mo’okū'auhau worksheet

Poster boards

ACTIVITY 3: Students will discover ways different ethnic groups keep their history. Students will also learn how their families keep their family histories.

  • After sharing ask student to answer the question:

    • “What is oral history?”

  • Students read short excerpt titled “Punahele” by Pukui, Haertig and Lee from Nana I ke Kumu.

  • Share with students 2 examples of genealogy chants with their short descriptions; use these to help students further understand oral histories.

  • Then ask students to pair-share their thoughts on the reading.

  • As pairs, have students share some of the ways their families keep their family records (students may or may not know this but have them at least think about it).


Homework:

  • Student asks a family member to share some ways they keep their family histories. There are many different ways families keep records; invite students to find out how theirs does it. It could be done by saving family pictures, keeping a book, or in a bible, etc.


Culminating project:

  • Review, memorize, practice, and present their mo`oku`auhau (genealogy).



Punahele” story (see below)



Teacher plans a time for students to share with peers and families.

ACTIVITY 4: Students will learn simple Hawaiian proverbs about values that have been handed down orally and still applied in some homes today.

  • Distribute pair-share worksheet (PS1):

  • Have students pair-share their thoughts on proverbs.

  • Dyads then share their thoughts with class.

  • Teacher can choose a topic for dyads to come up with their own saying or proverb.

  • Distribute proverb worksheets 1, 2, and 3 to students.

  • On the board or large sheet of paper, write the 3 `ōlelo no`eau.

  • Ask students, what they think each proverb might mean. Then share what you think the proverb means, and ask them to think of and share some examples in life that relate to the saying.

  • Students write their thoughts and draw a picture for each proverb 1, 2, and 3, on their worksheets.


Homework:

  • Students ask a family member to share a proverb or saying that they know and try to apply to their lives.

  • Students write a short explanation and draw a picture of proverb.


Culminating Project:

  • Use the dyad proverbs to create a book of class sayings/proverbs.

  • Have dyads draw pictures for their proverbs.


Proverb 1: Mai nā kupuna mai- the knowledge that comes from your ancestors 
Proverb 2: Makua- Mai kapae i ke a’o o ka makua, aia he ola ma laila- Do not set aside the teachings of one’s parents for there is life there  (Puke `ōlelo no`eau)  
Proverb 3: Keiki- Ka lei ha`ule `ole, he keiki- A lei that is never cast aside is one’s child  (Puke `ōlelo no`eau) 

Proverb worksheet 1,2,3

Topics could include, school, friendship, family, homework etc.

Student Name_____________________________________ Date _______ Student Worksheet 1
Mo’oku’auhau/Genealogy


O ________________________ ke kane.

O _______________________ ka wahine.

Noho pū lāua a hānau ‘ia e ___________________________

he kane/wahine.

O________________________ ke kane. O________________________ ka wahine.

Noho pū lāua a hānau ‘ia e ____________________________

he kane/wahine.

O________________________ ke kane. O________________________ ka wahine.

Noho pū lāua a hānau ‘ia e ____________________________

he kane/wahine.

Hānau ‘ia e ___________________________ he kane/wahine.


Student Name_____________________________________ Date _______ Student Worksheet


Mo’oku’auhau/Genealogy



My grandfather’s (fraternal) name is _________________________.

My grandmother’s (fraternal) is _____________________________.

They were married to each other and my father (name) ________________________ was born.

My grandfather’s (maternal) name is _________________________.

My grandmother’s (maternal) name is ________________________.

They were married to each other and my mother (name) _______________________ was born.

My father’s name is __________________________.

My mother’s name is _________________________.

They were married to each other and I, (your name) _____________________________, was born.




TEACHER GUIDE:

Genealogy
My grandfather’s (fraternal) name is _____________________________.

My grandmother’s (fraternal) is ____________________________.

They were married to each other and my name of father ________________________ was born.

My grandfather’s (maternal) name is _________________________.

They were married to each other and my name of mother _______________________ was born.

My father’s name is __________________________.

My mother’s name is _________________________.

They were married to each other and your name _____________________________ was born.



Mo`oku`auhau

O (name of dad’s father) ke kane.

O (name of dad’s mother) ka wahine.

Noho pū lāua a hānau ‘ia e (father’s name)

he kane.
O (name of mother’s father) ke kane.

O (name of mother’s mother) ka wahine.

Noho pū lāua a hānau ‘ia e (mother’s name)

he kane/wahine.


O (father’s name) ke kane.

O (mother’s name) ka wahine.

Noho pū lāua a hānau ‘ia e (student’s name) he kane/wahine.

Name ______________________________________ Date ___________________________


Draw something that your grandparents taught you about his or her traditions and culture.

Then describe your picture.



Name ______________________________________ Date ___________________________

Proverb 1

Kupuna
Mai nā kupuna mai –the knowledge that comes from your ancestors.

________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________


Name ______________________________________ Date ___________________________


Draw something that your parents taught you about his or her traditions and culture.

Then describe your picture.



Proverb 2

Makua
Mai kapae i ke a`o o ka makua, aia he ola ma laila… Do not set aside the teachings of one’s parents for there is life there.

________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________


Name ___________________________________________ Date _______________________


Draw a special lei that represents children. Then describe your picture.

Proverb 3

Keiki, Kamali’i, Lei
Ka lei hā’ule ‘ole, he keiki- A lei that is never cast aside is one’s child (Puke `ōlelo no`eau)

________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________






PS 1

Name ________________________________________ Date ____________

Pair Share Worksheet

Write the question in box #1, your opinion in box #2, and your shared opinions in box #3.

Question

Your Opinion

Shared Opinion











































































The Punahele (Favorite)
Excerpt from Nana I Ke Kumu

By Pukui, Haertig and Lee
“Before Hawai’i had a written language much of its history was kept through chants handed down from generation to generation. Children, usually the eldest child, were chosen to keep their family’s genealogy. They would be exposed to the rhythmic sounds of the chanting by his kupuna (grandparents), of their formal prayers and ancestral stories. By hearing the chanting of his or her kupuna, children learned to find hidden meanings in the words being spoken.”
“In ancient Hawaii, it was important for a person to know his/her genealogy chant. People often traveled between ahupua’a and if by accident they ended up in an area where he or she were not known, being able to recite their genealogy chant could save their life.”
“Chants were a way the Hawaiian people kept their creation legends, their songs for hula, their family stories and history, and especially their genealogy. Below are examples of two creation chants which many Hawaiians believe are also the genealogy of the Hawaiian people. The first chant is called the “Kumulipo”. It talks of the creation of all creatures, plants, gods and man, beginning from the darkness and into the light. The following is just a few lines of the 2012 lines in this creation chant.” Pg. 55
Kumulipo

O ke au i kahuli wela ka honua At the time that turned the heat of the earth

O ke au i kahuli lole ka lani At the time when the heavens turned and changed

O ke au i kukaiaka ka la At the time when the light of the sun was subdued

E hoomalamalama i ka malama To cause light to break forth

O ke au o Makalii i ka po At the time of night of Makali'i

O ka walewale hookumu honua ia Then began the slime which established the earth

O ke kumu o ka lipo, i lipo ai The source of deepest darkness

O ke kumu o ka po, i po ai The source of night

O ka lipolipo, o ka lipolipo Of the depth of darkness, of depth of darkness

O ka lipo o ka la, o ka lipo o ka po Of the darkness of the sun, in the depth of the night

Po wale hoi It was night

Hanau ka po So was night born

Hanau Kumulipo i ka po, he kane Kumulipo was born in the night, a male

Hanau Poele i ka po, he wahine Poele was born, a female
This oli speaks about the creation of the Hawaiian Islands. Again, it is just a few lines of the chant’s many lines. Wākea is the male and Papahānaumoku is the female. They live together for awhile and give birth to the islands of Hawai‘i and Maui. Wākea leaves Papahānaumoku and lives with Ho’ohokukalani and they give birth to Moloka'i. Papahānaumoku is jealous of Ho’ohokukalani and returns to Wakea. They both give birth to O'ahu, Kaua’i, Ni’ihau and the youngest, Kaho’olawe.


'O Wakea Noho iā Papahānaumoku

'O Wākea noho iā Papahanaumoku Wākea lives with Papahanaumoku

Hānau 'o Hawai'i he moku Born to them is Hawaii

Hānau 'o Maui he moku Born to them is Maui

Ho'i hou 'o Wākea noho iā Ho'ohokukalani Wakea returns to live with Ho’ohokukalani

Hānau 'o Moloka'i he moku Born to them is Moloka'i

Lili 'ōpū punalua 'o Papa iā Ho’ohokukalani Wakea becomes jealous of Ho’ohokukalani

Ho’i hou 'o Papa noho iā Wākea Papa returns to live with Wākea

Hānau 'o O'ahu he moku Born to them is O'ahu

Hānau 'o Kaua'i he moku Born to them is Kaua'i

Hānau 'o Ni’ihau he moku Born to them is Ni'ihau

He 'ula a 'o Kaho'olawe Kaho'olawe is sacred

Ke Kaulike He Ha’awina Kīwila Assessment (Elementary)

Name: _______________________________________ Date: _________________

My Family, My Home Culture” Assessment

MULTIPLE CHOICE: Circle the letter of the correct answer:


  1. Do you know how many generations are in your family today?

Yes # ____ No



  1. What are oral histories?

  1. Histories handed down in words

  2. A dentist appointment

  3. A history class oral exam



  1. What are proverbs?

  1. A verb and a pronoun

  2. Inspirational sayings

  3. None of the above



  1. What is an oli inoa?

  1. A Hawaiian name

  2. A cultural group

  3. A name chant



  1. Can you name at least 2 or 3 of your family’s ethnicities? (Write down all if you can.)

______________________________________________________________________________ __________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

5. Continued: Draw your family tree to show the generations in your ‘ohana.




  1. Using your own words, describe a family or 'ohana.

________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________





Ke Kaulike He Ha’awina Kīwila Grade 4 Lesson Plan #1 – Home Culture: My Family, My Home Culture





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