Multiple Intelligences Bloom’s Taxonomy: Six Thinking Levels Knowing Understanding



Download 198.38 Kb.
Date conversion20.04.2016
Size198.38 Kb.

Human Society and Its Environment
Gold
Stage 3

g0215591

Multiple

Intelligences

Bloom’s Taxonomy: Six Thinking Levels

Knowing

Understanding

Applying

Analysing

Creating

Evaluating

Verbal


I enjoy reading, writing & speaking

Use encyclopedia and NF Books to list

‘fast facts’ on Gold.



Task 1


Locate the meaning of gold mining words.

Worksheet 4B

Create a find a word



Task 4B

Outline Gold fever in the form of a news report

Task 2


Investigate gold mining/fossicking. Prepare an information report.

Worksheet 4A

Predict what would have happened if there no laws in the Gold Fields

Task 6A

Form teams and conduct a debate on a topical gold issue.

Evaluation


Mathematical

I enjoy working with numbers & science

Write a timeline of events – starting at the first gold rush in Australia

Task 3

Match the gold townships from an atlas to the Map of Australia

Worksheet 2

Calculate the value of gold nuggets found during the gold rush to today’s value.

Worksheet 4C

Investigate Gold Licences.

Write down a new licence system.



Task 6

Compare the’ gold rush’ population explosion in graph form

Worksheet 3

Visual


I enjoy painting drawing & visualising

Draw clothes of the diggers and attach them to

cardboard models



Task 7

Draw 3D or front, side and top view of gold fossicking equipment

Worksheet 4

Construct a Gold Licence. Make it look authentic.

Task 5A

Examine buildings of the 1850’s illustrate a street scene in detail using black pen.

Task 7B

Create a story board of the Eureka stockade for display around the classroom.

Write an article for the school newsletter to invite others to visit your classroom.



Worksheet 5A

Kinaesthetic


I enjoy doing hands-on activities

Make up

Gold Bingo /Trivial Pursuit

Or Celebrity Heads

Task 10B


Design gold jewellery using metallic pens on black paper

Task 9

Construct a gold fossicking or mining model Task 4A or

a diorama of the Eureka stockade Task 5




Create a board game using a Gold Rush Theme

Task 10A

Musical / Audio


I enjoy making & listening to music

Learn and sing any song relating to the Gold Rush.

Express the feelings of excitement on the time



Listen and analyse music with a gold theme.

What is the message it gives?



In a group compose a ‘Gold Diggers Rap’

Perform at assembly


Interpersonal


I enjoy working with others

Visit the Bushranger Website

http://scs.une.edu.au/Bushrangers/goldrush.htm

Prepare a biography on a bushranger from the Goldrush era Worksheet 6


Examine and illustrate transport forms Task 7A. Offer opinion on how people moved long distances.

Design a flag that reflects the Gold Rush era and could have been used at the Eureka Stockade.



Task 5

Interview a member of Historical Society for an understanding of the ‘way of life’ of the past Task 10A

Intrapersonal


I enjoy working by myself

Write a diary entry about living on the Gold Fields.

Express how you may have felt leaving home to travel to an unknown place with no friends and an uncertain future



Complete a recount of the main points after viewing the video ‘Australian Gold Rushes’

Examine a ‘gold’ production site anywhere in the world. Investigate all aspects of location, technology, job prospects and compare with that of the 1850’s

Task 8 ABCD

Complete a personal reflection on the ‘Gold’ unit.

Evaluation





Overview Gold – Stage 3

This unit provides opportunities for students to explore the influences of the discovering gold on Australian identity, environment and heritage. The unit focuses on significant events, actions and people as well as lifestyles and perspectives of the people and groups living at that time.



Foundation Statement
Change and Continuity, Cultures, Environments, Social Systems and Structures
Students explore the principles of Australian democracy and explain its development over time. They investigate significant events in Australia's past and explain the implications for the development of Australian identity, heritage and cultural diversity. They locate information from a variety of primary and secondary sources, presenting their findings in a range of ways.
Students explain how shared culture, heritage and language, including those of Aboriginal peoples, contribute to Australian and community identity. They explore cultural diversity by examining how cultures change through interactions with other cultures and the environment.
Students analyse Australian and global environments, identifying environmental issues and problems and they explore in which individuals and groups can contribute to solutions for these. They investigate human interactions with environments and recognise ecologically sustainable development. Students recognise various beliefs and practices and explain how these influence interactions with environments. They sketch, label and use maps, applying appropriate conventions and terminology.
Students identify Australia's social and economic connection to the world and the rights and responsibilities of Australian and global citizens. They examine decision-making processes at state and federal levels and explain the structures, roles and responsibilities of government. They examine changes in work practices and the rights and responsibilities of producers and users of goods and services. Students apply knowledge of participatory democracy to formulate plans and create possible solutions illustrating fairness and social justice for school, local, national and global problems.

Integrated Links and Outcomes



H.S.I.E:

CCS3.1 Explains the significance of particular people, groups, places, actions and events in the past in developing Australian identities and heritage.

CCS3.2 Explains the development of the principles of Australian democracy.

ENS3.6 Explains how various beliefs and practices influence the ways in which people interact with, change and value their environment.
English

TS3.1 Communicates effectively for a range of purposes and with a variety of audiences to express well developed, well organised ideas dealing with more challenging topics.

TS3.2 Interacts productively and with autonomy in pairs and groups of various sizes and composition, uses effective oral presentation skills and strategies and listens attentively.

RS3.6 Uses a comprehensive range of skills and strategies appropriate to the type of text being read.

WS3.9 Produces a wide range of wellstructured and wellpresented literary and factual texts for a wide variety of purposes and audiences using increasingly challenging topics, ideas, issues and written language features.
Science

INVS3.7 Conducts their own investigations and makes judgments based on the results of observing, questioning, planning, predicting, testing, collecting, recording and analysing data, and drawing conclusions.

DMS3.8 Develops and resolves a design task by planning, implementing managing and evaluating design processes.

UTS3.9 Evaluates, selects and uses a range of equipment, computer-based technology, materials and other resources to meet the requirements and constraints of investigation and design tasks.
Maths

M3.1 (a) Selects from a range of units and measuring devices to measure accurately and record in practical situations.

M3.1 (b) Makes conversions between measurement units.

M3.7 Uses 24 hour time and am and pm notation to read, construct and interpret timetables and timelines in real-life situations.

WS3.12 Produces texts in a fluent and legible style and uses computer technology to present these effectively in a variety of ways.

WM3.1 Extends a mathematical investigation by asking ‘what if’ questions.

WM3.2 Selects & uses appropriate problem solving strategies to complete investigations.

WM3.3 Uses mathematical terminology and some conventions to explain, interpret and represent mathematical situations in a variety of ways.

S3.1 Recognises, visualises, describes, makes and represents three-dimensional objects.

S3.4 Uses simple coordinates or compass points to describe position, and marks out points on a grid.

S3.5 Displays, reads and interprets a variety of graphs.

N3.4 Counts, compares, orders and calculates with decimals (up to two places) including multiplying and dividing by whole numbers up to 10.

N3.5 Selects and uses appropriate mental, written and calculator techniques to approximate and calculate solutions to problems involving whole numbers, money and decimal fractions

Creative Arts



VAS3.1 Investigates subject matter in an attempt to represent likenesses of things in the world.

VAS3.2 Makes artworks for different audiences, assembling materials in a variety of ways.
MUS3.2 Improvises, experiments, selects, combines and orders sound using musical concepts.

MUS3.3 Notates and discusses own work and the work of others.

MUS3.4 Identifies the use of musical concepts and symbols in a range of musical styles.
PD PE HEALTH

COS3.1 Communicates confidently in a variety of situations.

DMS3.2 Makes informed decisions and accepts responsibility for consequences.

INS3.3 Acts in ways that enhance the contribution of self and others in a range of cooperative situations.

PSS3.5 Suggests, considers and selects appropriate alternatives when resolving problems.
Web Resources

Many resources are available in book form - Internet sites to support this Unit include:

Sovereign Hill

http://www.sovereignhill.com.au/?id=sovhill

The Australian Gold Rush

http://www.cultureandrecreation.gov.au/articles/goldrush/

GOLD !

http://www.sbs.com.au/gold/



Gold Rush The Discovery of Australian Gold

http://amol.org.au/discovernet/tales/gold.asp

Gold 150

http://www.anmm.gov.au/gold150/gold150.htm

Old Mogo town

http://www.oldmogotown.com.au/ + http://www.oldmogotown.com.au/education.html

Canterbury Library – more Links

http://www.canterbury.nsw.gov.au/library/homezone/gold.htm

Webquest on Gold Rush

http://www.sunnhillss.qld.edu.au/WebQuests/gold/

Bushranger Site

http://scs.une.edu.au/Bushrangers/goldrush.htm




Task/ s

Learning Experiences

Date

Task 1mcj02981450000[1]

Introduce Unit Gold – Locate Fast Facts on Gold

  • Have student’s research information on Gold using encyclopedias and NF books.

  • List under heading GOLD Fast Facts Gold is ,,,,,,,,,,, Task 1mcj03643220000[1]

  • Title Page




Task 2mcj02981450000[1]

View Video of Australian Gold Rush - Australian Goldrushes 21 mins


Canada: Ph: (604) 523 6677 Fax: (604)523 6688

UK: Ph: 01454 324 222 Fax: 01454 325 222

USA: Ph: 1 800 665 4121 Fax: 1 800 665 2909 New Zealand: Combined Phone and Fax: 09 478 4540

ACN 002 009 618
CLASSROOM VIDEO : Orders 1/1 Vuko Place , Warriewood NSW 2102, Ph: (02) 9913 8700

Class complete a verbal recount of main points after viewing video



  • Identify main dates and events mcj03643220000[1]

  • Complete mapping Worksheet 2 Gold ‘Where they found it!’

  • Express in a diary entry about living in a gold field

Extension Activity

Write a News Report – Gold Fever hits Australia






Task 3mcj02981450000[1]mcj02981450000[1]

Timeline of Events

  • Visit Board of Studies website http://k6.boardofstudies.nsw.edu.au/hsie/bsvt/back09.html for information on the Goldrush timeline mcj03643220000[1]

  • Students to complete a timeline of events from the first findings of gold to the end of the Gold Rush era Task 3

  • Students to publish timeline using Microsoft Wordmcj03643220000[1]

Extension Activity Worksheet 3

Look at the population explosion – prepare a comparison graph using excel






Task 4mcj02981450000[1]mcj02981450000[1]mcj02981450000[1]mcj02981450000[1]

Gold Fossicking

  • Examine the various forms of Gold fossicking – panning, cradles etc.

  • Prepare an information report on one method Worksheet 4A

  • Create a 3D illustration

  • Use a dictionary to locate the meaning of gold mining related words Worksheet 4B

  • Work out how much the gold nuggets are worth in today’s market Worksheet 4Cmcj03643220000[1]

Extension

  • Create a diorama or model of gold mining /fossicking equipment. Task 4Amcj03643220000[1]

  • Create a find a word of Gold words Task 4B




Task 5mcj02981450000[1]mcj02981450000[1]mcj02981450000[1]mcj02981450000[1]

Eureka Stockade

  • Locate information about the Eureka stockade

  • Re-create the events in a story board Worksheet 5A

  • Write how you would have changed the licensing system

Design and make a different Eureka Flag Worksheet 5B

Extensionmcj03643220000[1]

  • Make a Gold license Task 5A

  • Design and make a diorama/ model of the Eureka stockade Task 5B







Task 6mcj02981450000[1]mcj02981450000[1]

Bushrangers and the Lawmcj03643220000[1]

  • Identify bushrangers that may have roamed Victoria at the time of the Gold Rushes

  • Complete a biography on a bushranger of the Gold rush era Worksheet 6mcj03643220000[1]

Extension

  • Look at the Law in the Gold Fields. Write a viewpoint on What if there weren’t any laws? Everyone to themselves – as the Police were never around. Task 6A



Task 7mcj02981450000[1]mcj02981450000[1]mcj02981450000[1]

Transport and Buildings and People

Research the available transport of the time



  • Draw illustrations of the transport with captions Task 7A

  • Provide your opinion on what it would have been like to travel long distances with poor road conditions.

Research Buildings of the time

  • Draw detailed illustration of street scenes the 1850 Task 7B

  • Add captions of building materials etc

Research the clothing of the time

  • draw clothing of the Australian and Chinese diggers attach to cardboard models Task 7C




Task 8mcj02981450000[1]mcj02981450000[1]mcj02981450000[1]mcj02981450000[1]

Gold Todaymcj03643220000[1]

  • Research information on Gold Mining locations and methods today Task 8A mcj03643220000[1]

  • Compare equipment and technology with those of the past Task 8B

  • Choose a location of Gold mining anywhere in world today and research the location. Task 8Cmcj03643220000[1]

  • Prepare a job application for a job stating why you would like to work there and your expectations. Task 8Dmcj03643220000[1]




Task 9mcj02981450000[1]

Gold Gold Gold

  • Have gold shown to class – specks, small pieces or dust or

  • Visit websites that explain facts about Gold production mcj03643220000[1]

  • After browsing through Jewelry catalogues, design gold jewelry using gold metallic pens on black paper Task 9

Extension

  • Listen to songs with Gold theme – What is the message?

  • Show jewelry designs at assembly with music playing – and messages on placards.

Task 10mcj02981450000[1]mcj02981450000[1]

End of an Era

  • Interview a member of the Historical Society about historical issues

Task 10Amcj03643220000[1]

  • Create a board game with Gold Rush theme Or Create and Play Gold Trivia Or Create and play Gold Bingo Or Create and Play Celebrity Heads using Bushrangers or Famous names of the Gold rush era Task 10 B

Evaluation

Conduct a debate on a topical issue from the unit



  • Write an personal reflection on the Gold unit

mcj03643220000[1]


WORKSHEETS

ANSWER PAGES

AND


EXAMPLESg0215599

Gold Fast Facts Task 1mcj03643220000[1]

Teacher Information Sheet

Students to ‘skim and scan’ encyclopedia and non fiction books to locate as many ‘fast’ facts as possible on Gold.

Here are some examples

GOLD IS ………………………..




  • A precious metal

  • A beautiful yellow colour

  • A conductor of electricity

  • A sign of wealth

  • A popular treasure for pirates

  • Able to melt at 1063 degrees Celsius

  • Alluvial meaning it is deposited in sand by flowing water

  • Comes naturally in nuggets

  • Ductile (easily stretched) - approximately 30 grams can be stretched to 1km

  • Found by mining or panning

  • Found in Egyptian tombs as jewellery and ornaments

  • Found in quartz rocks

  • Found in rivers

  • Found in seawater

  • Found in South Africa, Russia, Australia, Canada, USA and Italy

  • Found underground in mines

  • From the old English word ‘Geolu’ meaning yellow

  • Good for jewellery particularly rings, bracelets and necklaces

  • Highly reflective

  • Kept in Banks in ingots which are gold bars

  • Known as 18 carats when 18 parts of gold are mixed with 6 parts silver

  • Known as 24 carats when it is in its pure form

  • Known as 9 carats when 9 carats of gold is mixed with 15 parts silver

  • Known by the Chemical symbol AU

  • Malleable (easily shaped)

  • Manufactured in bar weighs that weigh 200kg

  • Mixed with other metals to make gold jeweler

  • Much heavier than water

  • Placed inside your body or mouth

  • Popular as filling for teeth in many countries

  • Quite scarce

  • Rust resistant, doesn’t corrode or tarnish

  • Seven times heavier than a piece of rock the same size

  • Shiny and gives a metallic glow

  • So thin that 367,000 leafs would make a pile 2.5cm high

  • Softest of metals but extremely dense

  • Unaffected by air, moisture and most solvents

  • Used as currency – both in the past and in some countries today

  • Used as medicine as radioisotopes in treating cancer

  • Used in anti-missile detectors

  • Used in space exploration

  • Used in technology to tint windows

  • Used in making computer chips

  • Used on temple roofs in Thailand and India

  • Usually mixed with silver when making jewellery

  • Very soft in it’s pure form of 24 carats

  • Very valuable

  • Was moulded into the world's most expensive toilet

  • Was one of the first known metals

  • What myths say Midas turned things into with his touch

  • Why the Gold Rushes were experienced in Australia & California

Name _____________________

Outcomes S3.4: WM3.3: CCS3.1 Worksheet 2mcj03643220000[1]

GOLD: WHERE THEY FOUND IT !

The following town names were places where gold was found. Find the place in the atlas and put a dot with the corresponding name next to it on the map of Australia.

(Do this in pencil) You may wish to locate information about these towns


NSW

QLD

VIC

NT

WA

TAS

Hill End


Gympie

Ballarat


Pine Creek

Hall’s Creek

Lefroy

Bathurst

Mt Morgan

Castlemaine

Tennant Creek

Mt Margaret

Fingal

Parkes

Charters Towers

Bendigo

The Granites

Kalgoorlie

Pieman River

Gulgong

Palmer River

Dunolly




Coolgardie

Mt Lyell

Kiandra

Coen

Maryborough




Southern Cross




Cobar




Walhalla




Murchinson





GOLD Timeline Task 3

Outcome M3.7

Teacher Information



1823

James McBrien found gold particles near Fish River, NSW

1840

Count Paul de Strzelecki found gold in the Australian Alps.

1841

Rev W. B.Clarke found gold near Hartley, NSW

1848

William Smith found gold at Yorky's Corner near Bathurst and showed it to the colonial secretary of NSW.

1849

People are lured to the Californian goldfields

1849

January: More than 1000 grams of gold was found at Glenmona station, 160 kms northwest of Melbourne but troopers dispersed men who came to fossick.

1850

March: William Campbell found gold at Clunes, Victoria. The discovery was concealed.

1851

February: Edward Hammond Hargraves and John Lister found specks of gold in Lewis Ponds Creek, NSW. Hargraves showed Lister and William Tom how to construct a cradle. Then left the fields.

1851

April: Lister and Tom found payable gold at what was later called Ophir and sold it to Hargraves. Hargraves claimed for himself the reward for the discovery of gold.

1851

May: 300 men prospecting at Ophir - The first goldrush in NSW broke out.

1851

June: The need to have a license to dig for gold proclaimed by the NSW government. June 1851

Gold discovered in Turon Valley north of Bathurst. Near Hill End, and Sofala.



1851

June: Hargraves was paid 500 pounds by the NSW government as the discoverer of gold in payable quantities

1851

July..Christopher Peters found a nugget of gold on a sheep station 65 kms north of Ballarat. By end of the year a goldfield was established there

1851

July Gold found at Clunes, Victoria. First gold rush began

1851

July The first great 'nugget' found near Louise Creek, 80 Kilometres north of Bathurst. It weighed 75 kilograms

1851

August Buninyong and Ballarat Gold Rush A gold license system set up in Victoria - 30 shilling a month

1851

August: Angry meetings were held by miners on many goldfields to condemn the licence system. August 185 1: Gold found at Ballarat's Golden Point

1851

October: men from Melbourne deserted to the Mt. Alexander goldfield to be joined by men from other states.

1851

November Meeting of 2000 to 3000 miners at Sofala to demand reduction of licence fee.

1851

December: Gold found at Bendigo

1852

30,000 adult males on Victorian goldfields

1852

December: NSW passed law to enforce that all aliens had to pay double for gold licence (60 shillings) and all people on goldfields had to pay it including traders, and publicans.

1853


Licence reduced to 11 monthly and to 8/ in Bendigo after digger unrest. Rewards granted to the discoverers of gold in Victoria. Gold commission established.

1853

June: The Anti Gold Licence Association was formed.

1853

October: In NSW gold licence reduced to 10 shillings and only diggers had to pay

1854

Grievances against licence system and agitation for miner's political rights increased. Riots on the Ballarat goldfields, resulting in the miner's rebellion at Eureka Stockade on 3 December.

1854


January: Cobb and Co established a coach firm running between many of the goldfields

1854

July: Gold found in Mt Magnet area of Western Australia

1854

September Licence inspections increased

1854

November Ballarat Reform League formed to protest Licence system

1854

December: 3,400 hundred police and troops raided the Eureka stockade. 5 soldiers and 30 diggers killed.

1855

Report by Victorian Goldfields Royal Commission. Goldfields Commission abolished and wardens established in their place. Local courts set up. Licence replaced by a Miner's Right costing 1 pound a year and entitling the holder to vote.

1856

All colonies (except WA) draw up constitutions and prepare for self government. Deep leads discovered at Ballarat. Maximum gold yields on the Victorian goldfields.

1857

Victorians receive manhood suffrage and vote by ballot. Anti Chinese riots on the Ovens Valley goldfields and at Ararat.

1858

NSW introduces manhood suffrage and vote by ballot. SA also passes anti Chinese legislation. found in Ballarat. One million people in the colonies. Probably a quarter of Victorian miners were Chinese.

1858

June: The 'Welcome' nugget was found near Ballarat. It weighed (2,217oz , 62 kg)

1859

Queensland proclaimed a separate colony and receives responsible government.

1860

Kiandra (NSW) goldfields discovered.

1861

Anti Chinese riots at Burrangong goldfields near Lambing Flat. Anti Chinese Restriction Act is passed in NSW. Rush to Forbes, NSW. Rush to the Otage goldfields in New Zealand

1867

Gold discovered at Gympie in Queensland

1869

"Welcome Stranger' gold nugget (2,284 oz, 64.5 kg) found in Victoria.

1871

Gold found at Pine Creek, NT

1872

Charters Towers goldfields in Queensland is officially proclaimed.

1873

Palmer River Goldfield, Old, proclaimed.

1874

Gold found Queensland outstripped NSW. SA permits miners Chinese miners to enter NT goldfields after demands by big companies.

1877

Chinese Restriction Act passed in Queensland to prevent Chinese working the goldfields.

1879

Chinese outnumber Europeans on the NT goldfields by about 7:1

1881

Further restrictions on Chinese passed in NSW and a poll tax of 10 imposed.

1882

Gold found near Cossack, WA and at Mt Morgan, Old.

1883

Silver found at Broken Hill, NSW

1886

Gold and copper found at Mt. Lyall, Tasmania. Chinese in NT forbidden from working on new goldfields for 2 years after discovery, unless they were the discoverers.

1888

Inter Colonial Conference on Chinese immigrants. NSW passes more restrictive legislation directed against the Chinese.

1892

Gold discovered at Coolgardie, WA and many people from the Eastern states join the rush.

1893

The "Golden Mile" of Kalgoorlie discovered.

Name __________________


Outcomes CCS3.1: N3.5 : S3.5 Worksheet 3mcj03643220000[1]

POPULATION EXPLOSION

The population exploded with each gold rush. In the 1850s alone, Australia's population trebled to 1. 1 million. The isolated colony, with a population of 39,000 in 1886, was teeming with 138,000 people a decade


Economically, Australia found its feet on top of the instant wealth of gold exports, as finds dwindled. A flood of immigrants turned to other trades and with the growing labour force and primary industries boomed.
The huge volume of traffic heading for the goldfields forced improvements in roads and communication which in turn opened fresh supply routes to aid struggling farm settlements, Following swiftly were the first railroads in Victoria in 1854 and then in New South Wales the following year.

Politically, gold and its followers had clout. The influx of settlers hastened democratic self-government while in later years, former diggers swelled the ranks of the manufacturing sector, swiftly developing the strength of the trade union movement


Instructions

Create a Graph (Using excel) that shows the difference between population in December 1851 and December 1861 in all the states





States


December 1851

December 1861

VICTORIA

97489

539764

NEW SOUTH WALES

197265

357362

SOUTH AUSTRALIA

66538

130812

TASMANIA

69187

89908

QUEENSLAND

INCLUDED IN NSW

34367

WESTERN AUSTRALIA

7186

15936

AUSTRALIA

437665

1168149

Information Report Example

The Gold Mining Method of the Sluice Box

Definition:

The cradle is a wooden strainer or box like structure for washing rocks and dirt that

contain gold.

Facts about the method of mining:

The dirt was put into the top tray, and then rocked vigorously. The water was then added. The

slurry would be washed out at the bottom. The gold would be left behind.

Facts about how this method affected the people:

People had to work together and co operate with each other. It was hard work and people

got blisters on their hands and got very tired.

Facts about how this method affected the ‘goldrush’

It made searching for gold easier for the diggers than panning as it was a faster method



Other interesting information:

You can still find gold in creeks – panning and cradling can still be done today



Illustration or Diagram

Illustration or Diagram



Name_________

Outcomes: WS3.9: CCS3.1 Worksheet 4Amcj03643220000[1]

Information Report

The gold mining method of ______________
Definition:

Facts about the method of mining:

Facts about how this method affected the people:

Facts about how this method affected the ‘goldrush’
Other interesting information:

Illustration or Diagram
Name________________

Outcome: RS3.6 Worksheet 4Bmcj03643220000[1]

GOLD WORDS

Definitions may vary – remember that they are to relate to Gold or the Gold era.

Locate meanings of these words in the dictionary.

Diggings
Diggers


Clearing
Quartz
Clay
Cradles
Windlasses
Shanty
Bullocks
Condamine bell
Mine shafts
Bushranger
Sovereign

Name ___________________

Outcomes: WM3.2: N3.4 Worksheet 4C

Golden Nuggets….What they are worth today.

Use current value of gold from internet/ newspaper to calculate the value of these gold nuggets.



Nugget

Discovered

Weight (oz)

Found at


Value today @

$ ________

per oz

Canadian

1853

1,319

Ballarat




Sarah sands

1853

1,117

Ballarat




Lady Hotham

1854

1,177

Ballarat




Maryborough

1855

1,034

Maryborough




Heron

1855

1,008

Fryer's creek




Blanche Barkly

1857

1,743

Kingower




Burrandong Nugget

1858

1,286

Lambing flat




Welcome

1858

2,217

Ballarat




Curtis Nugget

1867

975

Gympie




Welcome Stranger

1869

2,520

Dunolly




Viscount Canterbury

1870

1,114

Dunolly




Viscountess Canterbury

1870

912

Kangderaar




Precious

1871

1,717

Dunolly




Big Ben

1894

850

Londonderry




Poseidon

1906

953

Tarnagulla




The Golden Eagle

1931

1,135

Larkinville




The Hand of Faith: Found by Kevin Hillier on the 26th. September 1980 at Kingower in the Golden Triangle. Weighing 961oz (27.2 kg.) The nugget is the largest ever found with a metal detector and is the largest Gold Nugget in existence in the world today. It was sold to the Golden Nugget Casino in Las Vegas USA for the reported sum of one million dollars Australian and is now on display at the casino. Name_________________


Outcomes: CCS3.1: ENS3.6: WS3.9 Worksheet 5A

Story Board of the Eureka Stockade

1



2

3


4

5

6

Name___________

Outcome: VAS3.2 Worksheet 5Bmcj03643220000[1]

Eureka Flag


Name _____________ Worksheet 6

Information Sheetmcj03643220000[1]

Biography of a Bushranger during the Gold Rush era

Your Task:

To select an Australian bushranger during the gold rush era search for information on this bushranger and write a short biography on his life.

Visit the web site

http://scs.une.edu.au/Bushrangers/goldrush.htm

http://scs.une.edu.au/Bushrangers/home.htm


Researching Bushrangers:

Biographies - A biography tells the story of a person' life. It usually includes:



  • their name

  • their early life (where they were born, some family details and information about their childhood, if they married)]

  • their own family (if they married, where they lived)

  • their achievements (their work, other things they are remembered for, any obstacles they overcame, any awards or records)

  • their death (when and how they died).

GOLD CREATIVE ART WORKS

Outcome:VAS3.2

Teacher Information



GOLD LICENCE Task 5A

Create a Gold Licence by finding a sample diagram of photograph in a book or internet resource. Carefully copy the wording and style of writing. Insert your name and details. After completion of writing you may wish to stain the document with a wet tea bag and crumple it to make it look old. g0215633


EUREKA STOCKADE Task 5B


Locate illustrations and diagrams, footage and photographs of the Eureka Stockade. Attempt to re-create the scene by use of a Diorama or 3D model. Use any available material that lends itself to making tents, shafts, and the general environment of the era.


CLOTHING Task 7


g0215573

Draw illustrations of the digger’s clothes both Australian and the Chinese– cut out the paper clothes and attach to cardboard models. Include hair, hats, boots and shoes.

Display in classroom.
GOLD JEWELLERY Task 9

Using a Jewellers sales brochure or magazine advertisements, design jewellery using gold metallic pens on black paper. Any stones such as diamonds can be added using solver pen, rubbers using metallic pink, emeralds using metallic green, When finished mount on to white A4 paper and show at assembly. For something different add a dollar value!g0175593





The database is protected by copyright ©essaydocs.org 2016
send message

    Main page