Multicultural history of american art



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Chabot College Fall 2010

Course Outline for Art History 7

MULTICULTURAL HISTORY OF AMERICAN ART

Catalog Description:

7 – Multicultural History of American Art 3 units

A multicultural survey of American art from 1800 to the present. Special emphasis on art objects created by Native American, Asian American, African American, and Hispanic/Latino artists and artisans. Considers how art objects express the maker’s identity within the specific historical, social, and political circumstances of his or her life. Addresses how male and female artists and artisans from these groups have used various art forms to assert their gender and ethnic identity in response to historical change. 3 hours.

[Typical contact hours: 52.5]



Prerequisite Skills:

None


Expected Outcomes for Students:

Upon completion of this course student should be able to:



  1. recount an overview of the history of nineteenth-century European-American representations of other peoples;

  2. describe the origins and articulate the cultural meaning of landscape for nineteenth-century European-Americans;

  3. identify the style of Plains Indians artforms (circa 1800-1860) and articulate the meaning of that style for Plains peoples;

  4. identify examples of Hispanic/Latino architecture, sculpture, and painting; describe the origins of Hispanic style; and explain the meaning of that style for Hispanics living in the American Southwest in the nineteenth-century;

  5. identify the style, origins, and meaning of antebellum African American artforms for African Americans living in the North and South;

  6. discuss artistic opportunities presented to African American artists in post-bellum America;

  7. describe the emergence of tourist arts in the American Southwest at the end of the nineteenth century and describe the reception of those arts among European-Americans;

  8. explain the impact reservation life had on Plains Indian artforms;

  9. describe the origins of artistic styles associated with Harlem Renaissance and articulate the cultural and social objectives of those styles;

  10. identify the style of artwork produced at the Santa Fe Indian School in the 1930s, describe its origins, and articulate its meaning;

  11. discuss the style and meaning of art made by Asian American artists in the first part of the twentieth century;

  12. identify the artistic styles used by artists of the Mexican Mural Movement, identify the origins of these styles, and describe the political objectives of these artists;

  13. articulate the role art played for Japanese Americans during their internment;

  14. trace the origins of Modernism and describe how Native American, African American, Asian American and Hispanic/Latino artists responded;

  15. articulate the goals and objectives of activist artists working in the 1960s and 1970s;

  16. identify the styles used by Native American, Asian American, African American and Latino Postmodern artists; articulate the objectives of these artists; and discuss the politics of these artworks;

Course Content:

  1. History of nineteenth-century European-American representations of other peoples

  2. Origins and cultural meaning of landscape for nineteenth-century European-Americans

  3. Style and cultural meaning of Plains Indians artforms (circa 1800-1860) for Plains peoples

  4. Origin, style, and meaning of Hispanic architecture, sculpture, and painting for Hispanics living in the nineteenth-century American Southwest

  5. Style, origins, and meaning of antebellum African Americans artforms for African Americans living in the North and South

  6. Artistic opportunities presented to African American artists in post-bellum America

  7. Emergence of tourist arts in the American Southwest at the end of the nineteenth century and their reception among European-Americans

  8. Impact of reservation life on Plains Indian artforms

  9. Origins of artistic styles associated with Harlem Renaissance and their cultural and social objectives

  10. Style, origins, and meaning of the art produced at the Santa Fe Indian School in the 1930s

  11. Style and meaning of art made by Asian American artists in the first part of the twentieth century

  12. Origins, style, and political objectives of the Mexican Mural Movement

  13. Role of art for Japanese Americans during their internment

  14. Rise of Modernism and the response of Native American, African American, and Asian American artists

  15. Goals and objectives of activist artists working in the 1960s and 1970s

  16. Style, objectives, and politics of Native American, Asian American, and African American Postmodern artists


Methods of Presentation:

  1. Illustrated lectures utilizing slides and video

  2. Viewing exhibits of original artworks by Euro-American, Native American, African American and Asian American artists and artisans

  3. Large and small group discussion


Assignments and Methods of Evaluating Student Progress:


  1. Typical Assignments

    1. Write a one-page descriptive essays on designated work(s) of art

    2. Write a three-page interpretive essay on designated work(s) of art




  1. Methods of Evaluating Student Progress

    1. Class discussion

    2. Examination

    3. Written assignments

    4. Oral Presentation


Textbook(s) (Typical):
North American Indian Art, David W. Penney and George Horse Capture, Thames and Hudson, 2004. Most recent survey text on this subject.
Black Art: A Cultural History, Richard Powell, Thames and Hudson, 2002. Written by a leading scholar in the field, yet to be surpassed for its clear prose style and breadth of coverage.
Asian American Art: A History, 1850-1970, Gordon Chang, Mark Johnson, and Paul Karlstrom, Stanford University Press, 2008
Special Student Materials:

None


[DZ] ARTH 7 / new course outline

September 14, 2009



cp 10-12-09





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