Monitoring Section of Regional Haze sip/tip template Draft 2008 Mid-Atlantic/Northeast Visibility Union (mane-vu)



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DRAFT April 30May 12, 2008


Monitoring Section of

Regional Haze SIP/TIP Template

Draft 2008

Mid-Atlantic/Northeast Visibility Union (MANE-VU)

Edited by MARAMA

April 30May 12, 2008
Section 6. Monitoring Strategy

Table of Contents

6.1 Option A: States/Tribes that have Class I Areas

6.1 Option B: States/Tribes without Class I Areas

6.2 Monitoring Information for MANE-VU Class I Areas

6.2.1. Acadia National Park, Maine-Monitor Location

6.2.2. Brigantine Wilderness Area, New Jersey-Monitor Location

6.2.3. Great Gulf Wilderness Area, New Hampshire- Monitor Location

6.2.4. Lye Brook Wilderness Area, Vermont- Monitor Location

6.2.5. Moosehorn Wilderness Area, Maine- Monitor Location

6.2.6. Presidential Range/Dry River Wilderness Area, New Hampshire- Monitor Location

6.2.7. Roosevelt/Campobello International Park, New Brunswick, Canada- Monitor Location

List of Appendices





  • Monitoring Strategy for Each Class I Area in the state

  • Procedures to address elements necessary to assess and report on visibility (reporting, record keeping, etc.)


6. Monitoring Strategy
In the mid-1980’s, the IMPROVE program (Interagency Monitoring of Protected

Visual Environments) was established to measure visibility impairment in mandatory Class I areas throughout the United States. The monitoring sites are operated and maintained through a formal cooperative relationship between the U.S. EPA, National Park Service, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Bureau of Land Management, and U.S. Forest Service. In 1991, several additional organizations joined the effort: State and Territorial Air Pollution Program Administrators and the Association of Local Air Pollution Control (which now goes by The National Association of Clean Air Agencies) Officials, Western States Air Resources Council, Mid-Atlantic Regional Air Management Association, and Northeast States for Coordinated Air Use Management.


IMPROVE Program Objectives
Data collected at these sites are used by land managers, industry planners, scientists, public interest groups, and air quality regulators to understand and protect the visual air quality resource in Class I areas. Most importantly, the IMPROVE program scientifically documents for American citizens, the visual air quality of their wilderness areas and national parks. A Quality Assurance Project Plan (QAPP) for the IMPROVE program, dated March 2002, can be found at: http://vista.cira.colostate.edu/improve/Publications/QA_QC/IMPROVE_QAPP_R0.pdf
Program objectives include:


  • Establish current visibility and aerosol conditions in mandatory Class I areas,

  • Identify chemical species and emission sources responsible for existing anthropogenic visibility impairment,

  • Document long-term trends for assessing progress towards the national visibility goals,

  • Provide regional haze monitoring representing all visibility-protected federal Class I areas where practical, as required by EPA’s Regional Haze Rule.



6.1 Option A: States that have Class I Areas

Section 51.308(d)(4) of EPA’s Regional Haze Rule requires a monitoring strategy for measuring, characterizing, and reporting regional haze visibility impairment that is representative of all mandatory Class I Areas within the State of . The monitoring strategy relies upon participation in the Interagency Monitoring of Protected Visual Environments (IMPROVE) network.


The State/Tribe will evaluate the monitoring network periodically and make those changes needed to be able to assess whether reasonable progress goals are being achieved in each of ’s mandatory Class I Areas.
Section 51.308(d)(4)(ii) of EPA’s Regional Haze Rule requires the inclusion of procedures by which monitoring data and other information are used in determining the contribution of emissions from within the State to regional haze visibility impairment at mandatory Class I Federal areas both within and outside the State. MANE-VU and the State of accept the contribution assessment analysis completed by NESCAUM entitled, Contributions to Regional Haze in the Northeast and Mid-Atlantic States. See appendix . Methods of visibility and emissions data analysis used in preparing the Contribution Assessment include source apportionment analysis (see Appendix B), trajectory analysis (see Chapter 5), emissions divided by distance (see Chapter 4), emissions times upwind probability (see Chapter 4), chemical transport models (see Chapter 6), and Lagrangian dispersion modeling (see Chapter 7). The many techniques used provided a stronger weight of evidence for the assessment of contribution by source types and regions.
We agree that NESCAUM is providing quality technical information by using the IMPROVE program data and the VIEWS site. Information about the use of the default and alternative approaches to the calculation of baseline and natural background conditions can be found in Section 5 Assessment of Baseline and, Natural and Current Conditions of this SIP.
commits to meet the requirements under 40 CFR 51.308(d)(4)(iv) to report to EPA visibility data for each of the ’s Class I Area(s) annually.
Section 51.305 of the Federal Regulation Haze Rule requires each state containing a mandatory Class I Federal area to include in its SIP a strategy for evaluating reasonably attributable visibility impairment (RAVI) in any such Class I Area by visual observation or other appropriate monitoring techniques. The plan must provide for the consideration of available visibility data and must provide a mechanism for its use. This requirement does not apply to the State of because no specific sources have been identified as subject to RAVI requirements.
Section 51.308(d)(4)(v) of EPA’s Regional Haze Rule requires a statewide inventory of emissions of pollutants that are reasonably anticipated to cause or contribute to visibility impairment in mandatory Class I Federal areas within the State of . The Emissions Inventory Section (Section 7) of this SIP addresses this requirement.
Section 51.308(d)(4)(vi) of EPA’s Regional Haze Rule requires the inclusion of other monitoring elements, including reporting, recordkeeping, and other measures, necessary to assess and report visibility. While the state of feels that the current IMPROVE network provides sufficient data to adequately measure and report progress toward the goals set for MANE-VU and other Class I sites that we contribute to, has also found additional monitoring information useful to assess visibility and fine particle pollution in the region in the past. Examples of these data include results from the MANE-VU RAIN network, which provides continuous, speciated information on rural aerosol characteristics and visibility parameters; the EPA CASTNET program, which has provided complementary rural fine particle speciation data at non-class I sites; the EPA Speciation Trends Network (STN), which provides speciated, urban fine particle data to help develop a comprehensive picture of local and regional sources; state-operated rural and urban speciation sites using IMPROVE or STN methods; and the Supersites program, which has provided information through special studies that generally expands our understanding of the processes that control fine particle formation and transport in the region. will continue to utilize these and other data -- as they are available and fiscal realities allow -- to improve our understanding of visibility impairment and to document progress toward our reasonable progress goals under the Regional Haze Rule.

6.1 Option B: States/Tribes without Class I Areas

Section 51.308(d)(4)(iii) of EPA’s Regional Haze Rule requires the inclusion of procedures by which monitoring data and other information are used in determining the contribution of emissions from within the State to regional haze visibility impairment at mandatory Class I Federal areas both within and outside the State. MANE-VU and the State of accept the contribution assessment analysis completed by NESCAUM entitled, Contributions to Regional Haze in the Northeast and Mid-Atlantic States. See appendix . Methods of visibility and emissions data analysis used in preparing the Contribution Assessment include source apportionment analysis (see Appendix B), trajectory analysis (see Chapter 5), emissions divided by distance (see Chapter 4), emissions times upwind probability (see Chapter 4), chemical transport models (see Chapter 6), and Lagrangian dispersion modeling (see Chapter 7). The many techniques used provided a stronger weight of evidence for the assessment of contribution by source types and regions.


We agree that NESCAUM is providing quality technical information by using the IMPROVE program data and the VIEWS site. Information about the use of the default and alternative approaches to the calculation of baseline and natural background conditions can be found in Section 5 Assessment of Baseline and , Natural and Current Conditions of this SIP.
does not contain any Class I Areas; therefore no monitoring plan is required under Section 51.308(d)(4) or Section 51.30 of EPA’s Regional Haze Rules.
6.2 Monitoring Information for MANE-VU Class I Areas
6.2.1. Acadia National Park, Maine - Monitor Location

The IMPROVE monitor for the Acadia National Park (indicated as ACAD1) is located at Acadia National Park Headquarters in Maine at an elevation of 157 meters, a latitude of 44.38˚ and a longitude of -68.26˚.



Acadia National Park - Monitoring Strategy

The haze data for Acadia National Park is collected by an IMPROVE monitor (ACAD1) that is operated and maintained by the National Park Service. The State considers the ACAD1 site as adequate for assessing reasonable progress goals of the Acadia National Park and no additional monitoring sites or equipment are necessary at this time. The State routinely participates in the IMPROVE monitoring program by sending regional representatives to the IMPROVE meetings.

Figure #. Map of Acadia National Park (source: Tom Downs of Maine DEP and http://www.maine.gov/dep/air/meteorology/images/Acadia.jpg)

Figure #. Acadia National Park on a clear day (source: http://www.hazecam.net/class1/acadia.html)



Figure #. Acadia National Park on a hazy day (source: http://www.hazecam.net/class1/acadia.html)





6.2.2. Brigantine Wilderness Area, New Jersey - Monitor Location

The IMPROVE monitor for the Brigantine Wilderness Area (indicated as BRIG1) is located at the Edwin B. Forsythe National Wildlife Refuge Headquarters in Oceanville New Jersey at an elevation of 5 meters, a latitude of 39.47˚ and a longitude of -74.45˚.


Brigantine Wilderness Area - Monitoring Strategy


The haze data for Brigantine Wilderness Area is collected by an IMPROVE monitor (BRIG1) that is operated and maintained by the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service. The State considers the BRIG1 site as adequate for assessing reasonable progress goals of the Brigantine Wilderness Area and no additional monitoring sites or equipment are necessary at this time. The State routinely participates in the IMPROVE monitoring program by sending regional representatives to the IMPROVE meetings.

Figure #. Map of Edwin B. Forsythe National Wildlife Refuge (source: http://www.fws.gov/northeast/forsythe/MAP.htm)



Figure #. Brigantine Wilderness Area on a clear day (source: http://www.hazecam.net/class1/brigantine.html)




Figure #. Brigantine Wilderness Area on a hazy day (source: http://www.hazecam.net/class1/brigantine.html)




6.2.3. Great Gulf Wilderness Area, New Hampshire - Monitor Location

The IMPROVE monitor for the Great Gulf Wilderness Area (indicated as GRGU1) is located at Camp Dodge, which is located in the mid northern area of Greens Grant, just east and south of where Route 16 crosses the Greens Grant/Martins Location boundary in the White Mountain National Forest, South of Gorham New Hampshire, at an elevation of 454 meters, a latitude of 44.31˚ and a longitude of -71.22˚. This monitor also represents the Presidential Range/Dry River Wilderness Area in New Hampshire.


Great Gulf Wilderness Area - Monitoring Strategy

The haze data for Great Gulf Wilderness Area is collected by an IMPROVE monitor (GRGU1) that is operated and maintained by the Forest Service. The State considers the GRGU1site as adequate for assessing reasonable progress goals of the Gulf Wilderness Area and no additional monitoring sites or equipment are necessary at this time. The State routinely participates in the IMPROVE monitoring program by sending regional representatives to the IMPROVE meetings.

Figure #. Map of Great Gulf Wilderness Area and Presidential Range/Dry River Wilderness Area (source: http://www.maine.gov/dep/air/meteorology/images/NHclass1.jpg)

Figure #. Great Gulf Wilderness Area on a clear day (source: http://www.wilderness.net/)




Figure #. Great Gulf Wilderness Area on a hazy day (source: http://www.wilderness.net/)




6.2.4. Lye Brook Wilderness, Vermont - Monitor Location

The IMPROVE monitor for the Lye Brook Wilderness Area (indicated as LYBR1) is located on Mount Equinox at the windmills in Manchester Vermont. The monitor is not in the Wilderness Area but is located on a mountain peak across the valley to the west of the wilderness area. The Lye Brook Wilderness Area is at high elevation in the mountains and the IMPROVE site across the valley is at about the same height as the Wilderness Area at an elevation of 1015 meters, a latitude of 43.15˚ and a longitude of -73.13˚.


Lye Brook Wilderness -Monitoring Strategy

The haze data for Lye Brook Wilderness Area is collected by an IMPROVE monitor (LYBR1) that is operated and maintained by the Forest Service. The State considers the LYBR1 site as adequate for assessing reasonable progress goals of the Lye Brook Wilderness Area and no additional monitoring sites or equipment are necessary at this time. The State routinely participates in the IMPROVE monitoring program by sending regional representatives to the IMPROVE meetings.

Figure #. Map of Lye Brook Wilderness Area (source: http://www.wilderness.net/index.cfm?fuse=NWPS&sec=stateView&state=NH&map=menhvt and Paul Wishinski of Vermont)

Figure #. Map of Lye Brook Wilderness Area and the IMPROVE Monitoring site (source: Paul Wishinski and GoogleEarth)


Figure #. Lye Brook Wilderness Area on a clear day (source: http://www.hazecam.net/class1/lye.html)



Figure #. Lye Brook Wilderness Area on a hazy day (source: http://www.hazecam.net/class1/lye.html)




6.2.5. Moosehorn Wilderness Area, Maine - Monitor Location

The IMPROVE monitor for the Moosehorn Wilderness Area (indicated as MOOS1) is located near McConvey Road, about one mile northeast of the National Wildlife Refuge Baring Unit Headquarters in Maine at an elevation of 78 meters, a latitude of 45.13˚ and a longitude of -67.27˚. This monitor also represents the Roosevelt/Campobello International Park in New Brunswick, Canada.


Moosehorn Wilderness Area -Monitoring Strategy

The haze data for Moosehorn Wilderness Area is collected by an IMPROVE monitor (MOOS1) that is operated and maintained by the Fish & Wildlife Service. The State considers the MOOS1 site as the only current IMPROVE monitoring site in Maine adequate for assessing reasonable progress goals of the Moosehorn Wilderness Area and no additional monitoring sites or equipment are necessary at this time. The State routinely participates in the IMPROVE monitoring program by sending regional representatives to the IMPROVE meetings.


Figure #. Map of Moosehorn Wilderness Area that differentiates between the Wilderness Area and the Wildlife Refuge (source: Martha Webster of Maine

Department of Environmental Protection-Bureau of Air Quality)

Figure #. Map of the Baring and Edmunds Divisions of the Moosehorn National Wildlife Refuge and the IMPROVE monitor (source: The Refuge Manager at Moosehorn Wilderness Area)


Figure #. Moosehorn Wilderness Area on a clear day (source: NESCAUM)


Figure #. Moosehorn Wilderness Area on a hazy day (source: NESCAUM)





6.2.6. Presidential Range/Dry River Wilderness Area, New Hampshire - Monitor Location

The IMPROVE monitor for the Great Gulf Wilderness Area also represents the Presidential Range/Dry River Wilderness Area (indicated as GRGU1). The Presidential Range/Dry River Wilderness Area monitor is located at Camp Dodge, White Mountain NF, South of Gorham New Hampshire, at an elevation of 454 meters, a latitude of 44.31˚ and a longitude of -71.22˚.


Presidential Range/Dry River Wilderness Area - Monitoring Strategy

The haze data Presidential Range/Dry River Wilderness Area is collected by an IMPROVE monitor (GRGU1) that is operated and maintained by the Forest Service. The State considers the GRGU1site as adequate for assessing reasonable progress goals of the Presidential Range/Dry River Wilderness Area and no additional monitoring sites or equipment are necessary. The State routinely participates in the IMPROVE monitoring program by sending regional representatives to the IMPROVE meetings.

Figure #. Map of Great Gulf Wilderness Area and Presidential Range/Dry River Wilderness Area (source: http://www.maine.gov/dep/air/meteorology/images/NHclass1.jpg)

Figure #. Presidential Range/Dry River Wilderness Area shares a scene camera with Great Gulf Wilderness Area. Since the pictures would be the same for both sites, below is a picture of Presidential Range/Dry River Wilderness Area in autumn (source: http://www.wilderness.net/)



6.2.7. Roosevelt/Campobello International Park, New Brunswick, Canada - Monitor Location

The IMPROVE monitor for the Moosehorn Wilderness Area is also the monitor for Roosevelt/Campobello International Park (indicated as MOOS1). The monitor is located near McConvey Road, about one mile northeast of the Moosehorn National Wildlife Refuge Baring Unit Headquarters in Maine at an elevation of 78 meters, a latitude of 45.13˚ and a longitude of -67.27˚.


Roosevelt/Campobello International Park -Monitoring Strategy

The haze data for Roosevelt/Campobello International Park is collected by the IMPROVE monitor (MOOS1) that is operated and maintained by the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service. The State considers the MOOS1 site as the only current IMPROVE monitoring site in Maine or Canada adequate for assessing reasonable progress goals of the Roosevelt/Campobello International Park. No additional monitoring sites or equipment are necessary. The State routinely participates in the IMPROVE monitoring program by sending regional representatives to the IMPROVE meetings.

Figure #. Map of Roosevelt/Campobello International Park (source: http://www.maine.gov/dep/air/meteorology/images/rcip.jpg)

Figure #. Roosevelt/Campobello International Park on a clear day (source: Chessie Johnson)




Figure #. Roosevelt/Campobello International Park on a hazy day (source: Roosevelt Campobello International Park Commission)







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