Modern History Stage 6 Syllabus Original published version updated



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History Extension will further develop investigative, research and presentation skills for those students who choose to take the course.
9.4 Part III: Core Study: The World at the Beginning of the Twentieth Century
Principal focus: Students lay the foundations for their twentieth-century studies by investigating the forces and ideas for change and continuity that shaped the early twentieth- century world using the methods of historical inquiry.
Outcomes
Students:

P1.1 describe the role of key individuals, groups and events of selected studies from the eighteenth century to the present

P1.2 investigate and explain the key features and issues of selected studies from the eighteenth century to the present

P2.1 identify forces and ideas and explain their significance in contributing to change and continuity from the eighteenth century to the present

P3.1 ask relevant historical questions

P3.2 locate, select and organise relevant information from different types of sources

P3.3 comprehend and analyse sources for their usefulness and reliability

P3.4 identify and account for differing perspectives and interpretations of the past

P3.5 plan and present the findings of historical investigations, analysing and synthesising information from different types of sources

P4.1 use historical terms and concepts appropriately

P4.2 communicate a knowledge and understanding of historical features and issues using appropriate and well-structured oral and written forms
Students learn to:


  • ask relevant historical questions about the world at the beginning of the twentieth century

  • locate, select and organise information from different types of sources, including ICT, to describe and analyse relevant features and issues of the world at the beginning of the twentieth century

  • analyse the major events and issues relevant at the turn of the century

  • assess the forces for change and continuity at the turn of the century

  • describe and evaluate the role of key individuals and groups at the turn of the century

  • evaluate the usefulness and reliability of sources

  • account for and assess differing perspectives and interpretations of significant events, people and issues at the beginning of the twentieth century

  • present the findings of investigations on aspects of the period, analysing and synthesising information from different types of sources

  • communicate an understanding of relevant concepts, features and issues using appropriate and well-structured oral and/or written and/or multimedia forms including ICT.



Students learn about SOME OR ALL of the following:
1 The nature of European society

  • rich and poor

  • urbanisation and industrialisation

  • social change

  • forms of government


2 Imperialism

  • reasons for the growth of imperialism

  • impact of imperialism on Africa and/or Asia and/or the Middle East and/or the Pacific

  • colonial rivalries


3 Emerging forces and ideas

  • politics of the working class: socialism, trade unionism, Marxism

  • anarchism

  • nationalism

  • internationalism, globalisation

  • democracy, liberalism


4 Causes of World War I

  • long-term and short-term causes


Aspects of this study may be integrated in the case studies and/or developed into an historical investigation.
10 Content: HSC Course
Students are required to study Parts I, II, III and IV of the course.
10.1 Part I: Core Study: World War I 1914–1919: A Source-based Study
Percentage of course time: 25%
Principal focus: Students use different types of sources and acquired knowledge to investigate key features, issues, individuals, groups and events in the study of World War I.
Students’ prior learning about World War I

At Stage 5, students will learn about Australia and World War I, including the reasons for Australia’s involvement; the places where Australians fought; the experiences of Australians at Gallipoli; how and why the Anzac legend was created; the conscription debate in Australia; experiences of one group in Australia during World War I and the ways that Australia has commemorated World War I over time.


Outcomes
Students:

H1.1 describe the role of key features, issues, individuals, groups and events of selected twentieth-century studies

H1.2 analyse and evaluate the role of key features, issues, individuals, groups and events of selected twentieth-century studies

H3.2 locate, select and organise relevant information from different types of sources

H3.3 analyse and evaluate sources for their usefulness and reliability

H3.4 explain and evaluate differing perspectives and interpretations of the past

H3.5 plan and present the findings of historical investigations, analysing and synthesising information from different types of sources

H4.1 use historical terms and concepts appropriately



H4.2 communicate a knowledge and understanding of historical features and issues, using appropriate and well-structured oral and written forms
Students learn to:


  • ask relevant questions in relation to World War I

  • locate, select and organise information from different types of primary and secondary sources, including ICT, about key features and issues related to World War I

  • make deductions and draw conclusions about key features and issues of World War I

  • evaluate the usefulness, reliability and perspectives of sources

  • account for and assess differing historical interpretations of World War I

  • use historical terms and concepts appropriately

  • present the findings of investigations on aspects of World War I, analysing and synthesising information from different types of sources

  • communicate an understanding of the features and issues of World War I using appropriate and well-structured oral and/or written and/or multimedia forms
    including ICT.


In investigating for the source-based study, students shall develop knowledge and skills to respond to different types of sources and relevant historiographical issues related to World War I.

Students learn about:
1 War on the Western Front

  • the reasons for the stalemate on the Western Front

  • the nature of trench warfare and life in the trenches dealing with experiences of Allied and German soldiers

  • overview of strategies and tactics to break the stalemate including key battles: Verdun, the Somme, Passchendaele

  • changing attitudes of Allied and German soldiers to the war over time


2 The home fronts in Britain and Germany

  • total war and its social and economic impact on civilians in Britain and Germany

  • recruitment, conscription, censorship and propaganda in Britain and Germany

  • the variety of attitudes to the war and how they changed over time in Britain and Germany

  • the impact of the war on women’s lives and experiences in Britain


3 Turning points


4 Allied Victory

  • events leading to the Armistice, 1918

  • reasons for the Allied victory and German collapse

  • the roles and differing goals of Clemenceau, Lloyd George and Wilson in creating the Treaty of Versailles



10.2 Part II: National Studies
Percentage of course time: 25%
Principal focus: Students investigate key features and issues in the history of ONE country during a specific period of the twentieth century.
Outcomes
Students:

H1.1 describe the role of key features, issues, individuals, groups and events of selected twentieth-century studies

H1.2 analyse and evaluate the role of key features, issues, individuals, groups and events of selected twentieth-century studies

H2.1 explain forces and ideas and assess their significance in contributing to change and continuity during the twentieth century

H3.1 ask relevant historical questions

H3.2 locate, select and organise relevant information from different types of sources

H3.3 analyse and evaluate sources for their usefulness and reliability

H3.4 explain and evaluate differing perspectives and interpretations of the past

H3.5 plan and present the findings of historical investigations, analysing and synthesising information from different types of sources

H4.1 use historical terms and concepts appropriately

H4.2 communicate a knowledge and understanding of historical features and issues, using appropriate and well-structured oral and written forms


Students learn to:


  • ask relevant historical questions

  • locate, select and organise information from different types of sources, including ICT, to describe and analyse relevant features and issues

  • describe and evaluate the role of key individuals, groups and events during the period

  • explain and evaluate the significance of forces contributing to change and continuity during the period

  • evaluate the usefulness and reliability of sources

  • account for and assess differing perspectives and interpretations of the period

  • present the findings of investigations on aspects of the national study, analysing and synthesising information from different types of sources

  • communicate an understanding of relevant concepts, features and issues using appropriate and well-structured oral and/or written and/or multimedia forms including ICT.

Students will undertake ONE national study from those listed:


A Australia 1945–1983

B China 1927–1949

C Germany 1918–1939

D India 1919–1947

E Indonesia 1959–1998

F Japan 1904–1937

G Russia and the Soviet Union 1917–1941

H South Africa 1960–1994



I USA 1919–1941

Option A: Australia 1945–1983
Principal focus: Students investigate the key features and issues of the history of Australia 1945–1983.
Key features and issues:

  • Liberal and Labor visions for post-war Australia

  • impact of communism

  • conformity and protest

  • changes in society

  • nature and impact of immigration

  • foreign policy and changing relations with the wider world


Students learn about:
1 Visions for post-war Australia

  • the Labor Party and its vision for post-war Australia

  • creation of the Liberal Party and its vision for post-war Australia

  • reasons for the defeat of the Labor government in 1949


2 The Menzies era – conservatism in a changing world

  • fear of communism

  • the Australian Labor Party (ALP) split in 1954 and its consequences

  • nature and impact of social and economic change in Australia in the 1950s and 1960s

  • immigration, role of women, Aboriginal rights, popular culture

  • reaction to the Vietnam War and development of popular protest movements


3 From Whitlam to Fraser

  • the Labor Party in power: social, political and economic policies

  • the 1975 ‘dismissal’ of the Whitlam government; an historical assessment of the Whitlam government

  • nature and impact of social and economic change under Whitlam and Fraser


4 Foreign policy 1945–1983

  • nature, aims and strategy of Australian foreign policy

  • Australia and the Cold War

  • changing relations with Asia and the Pacific


Option B: China 1927–1949
Principal focus: Students investigate the key features and issues of the history of China 1927–1949.
Key features and issues:

  • quest for political stability and national unification

  • nature and impact of nationalism

  • nature and impact of communism

  • development and impact of Maoism

  • nature, impact of and response to Japanese imperialism

  • reasons for the Communist victory


Students learn about:
1 The Nationalist decade 1927–1937

  • political, economic and social issues in the Chinese Republic in 1927

  • the Northern Expedition and its impact

  • achievements and limitations of the Guomindang (GMD/Kuomintang) Nationalist Government


2 The rise of Mao Zedong

  • Chinese Communist Party (CCP) ideology

  • rise and consolidation of Maoism

  • the Long March and its political and social consequences


3 Resistance to Japan

  • military, social and economic impact of Japanese invasions from 1931

  • differing aims and strategies of the GMD and CCP towards the Japanese invasion of China

  • role and impact of the leadership of Mao Zedong (Mao Tse-tung) and Jiang Jieshi (Chiang Kai-shek)

  • political and social significance of the Yan’an (Yenan) period


4 The triumph of the Chinese Communist Party

  • the Civil War and military success of the CCP

  • reasons for the communist victory


Option C: Germany 1918–1939
Principal focus: Students investigate the key features and issues of the history of Germany 1918–1939.
Key features and issues:

  • successes and failures of democracy

  • nature and role of nationalism

  • influence of the German army

  • nature and influence of racism

  • changes in society

  • the nature and impact of Nazism

  • aims and impact of Nazi foreign policy


Students learn about:
1 Weimar Republic

  • emergence of the Democratic Republic and the impact of the Treaty of Versailles

  • political, economic and social issues in the Weimar Republic to 1929

  • collapse of the Weimar Republic 1929–1933

  • impact of the Great Depression on Germany


2 The rise of the Nazi Party

  • rise of the Nazi Party (NSDAP) from 1923

  • Hitler’s accession to power

  • initial consolidation of Nazi power 1933–1934


3 Nazism in power

  • Hitler’s role in the Nazi state

  • Nazism as totalitarianism

  • the role of propaganda, terror and repression; SA and SS; opposition to Nazism

  • social and cultural life in the Nazi state: role of Hitler Youth, women, religion

  • Nazi racial policy; anti-Semitism: policy and practice to 1939


4 Nazi foreign policy

  • nature of Nazi foreign policy: aims and strategies to September 1939

  • impact of ideology on Nazi foreign policy to September 1939



Option D: India 1919–1947
Principal focus: Students investigate the key features and issues of the history of India 1919–1947.
Key features and issues:

  • changing nature of imperialism

  • nature and impact of nationalism

  • nature and impact of satyagraha

  • reasons for the growth and impact of communalism

  • differing views of democracy

  • independence and partition


Students learn about:
1 Gandhi and nationalism in the 1920s

  • political, economic and social issues in India in 1919

  • nature, impact and significance of campaigns of resistance 1919–1922

  • the role, ideas and impact of Gandhi


2 Congress consolidation in the 1930s

  • significance of the Salt Satyagraha

  • changes in British power: the Round Table Conferences; the Government of India
    Act 1935

  • 1937 elections and formation of Congress ministries


3 Muslims and politics in the 1930s

  • the rise of communalism

  • role of Mohammad Ali Jinnah

  • growth of the All-India Muslim League

  • the demand for Pakistan


4 The road to Independence and Partition

  • the impact of World War II on Anglo-Indian relations

  • impact of the ‘Quit India’ Movement

  • reasons for and the nature of Independence

  • reasons for and the nature of Partition


Option E: Indonesia 1959–1998
Principal focus: Students investigate the key features and issues of the history of Indonesia 1959–1998.
Key features and issues:

  • nature and impact of nationalism

  • nature and impact of Pancasila

  • challenge of communism

  • role and influence of the army

  • nature, impact and collapse of the New Order

  • challenge of regionalism

  • aims and impact of foreign policy


Students learn about:
1 Guided Democracy 1959–1963

  • political, social and economic issues in Indonesia in 1959

  • Pancasila: principles and constitution

  • Sukarno’s role in politics

  • nature of Indonesian foreign policy: aims and strategies


2 The 1965 coup


3 The New Order

  • ideology of the New Order

  • nature and impact of political, economic and foreign policies

  • role of the army

  • nature and impact of religious and regional issues


4 Collapse of the New Order

  • political, social and economic challenges to the Suharto regime

  • problems of East Timor and other regions

  • reasons for the end of the Suharto era

  • Indonesia’s foreign relations in the 1990s


Option F: Japan 1904–1937
Principal focus: Students investigate the key features and issues of the history of Japan 1904–1937.
Key features and issues:

  • nature and role of nationalism

  • nature and impact of internationalism

  • successes and failures of democracy

  • changes in society

  • nature, growth and impact of imperialism

  • nature and impact of militarism

  • tensions between tradition and modernisation

  • aims and impact of Japanese foreign policy


Students learn about:
1 Japan as an emerging power

  • impact of Japanese expansion: Russo-Japanese War, annexation of Korea

  • status as a great power: 21 Demands, role in World War I, Washington Conference

  • political, social and economic issues in Japan by 1921


2 Challenges to traditional power and authority in the 1920s

  • the introduction of limited liberal democracy

  • political influence of the zaibatsu

  • impact of the Seiyukai and other political parties on Japanese political systems and governments

  • challenges of the genro, bureaucracy and army to party politics


3 Rise of militarism in the 1930s

  • political and economic impact of the Great Depression

  • development and impact of modernisation and urbanisation

  • role and significance of the army and political divisions within it

  • hostility towards the zaibatsu and the collapse of party politics

  • differing domestic responses to militarism


4 Japanese foreign policy

  • nature of Japanese foreign policy: aims and strategy to 1937

  • impact of ideology on Japanese foreign policy to 1937



Option G: Russia and the Soviet Union 1917–1941
Principal focus: Students investigate the key features and issues of the history of Russia and the Soviet Union 1917–1941.
Key features and issues:

  • communism in theory and practice

  • Bolshevik consolidation of power

  • changes in society

  • leadership conflict and differing visions for the USSR

  • purpose and impact of collectivisation and industrialisation

  • nature and impact of Stalinism

  • aims and impact of Soviet foreign policy


Students learn about:
1 Bolshevik consolidation of power

  • Lenin and the Bolshevik Revolution in 1917

  • main features of Communist (Bolshevik) ideology at the time of the revolution

  • social and political reforms of the Bolshevik government

  • significance of the Treaty of Brest-Litovsk

  • the Civil War and aims, nature and impact of War Communism

  • the New Economic Policy (NEP)


2 Stalin’s rise to power

  • power struggle between Trotsky and Stalin and its immediate aftermath

  • reasons for the triumph of Stalin as leader of the USSR


3 The Soviet State under Stalin

  • Stalin’s role in the Soviet state

  • introduction of collectivisation and industrialisation (Five Year Plans)

  • Stalinism as totalitarianism

  • impact of purges, show trials and ‘the Terror’ on the Communist Party and Soviet society

  • impact of Stalinism on society, culture and the economy


4 Soviet foreign policy

  • changing nature of Soviet foreign policy: aims and strategies 1917–1941

  • impact of changing ideology on Soviet foreign policy 1917–1941


Option H: South Africa 1960–1994
Principal focus: Students investigate the key features and issues of the history of South Africa 1960–1994.
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