Modern History Stage 6 Syllabus Original published version updated



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Modern History
Stage 6

Syllabus
Original published version updated:

June 2009 – Assessment and Reporting information updated

November 2009 – Course hours information updated

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ISBN 1 7414 7085 4


2009873

Contents
1 Background 5

2 Rationale 6

3 Continuum of Learning 7

4 Aim 8


5 Objectives 8

6 Course Requirements 8

7 Course Structure 9

8 Objectives and Outcomes 11

8.1 Objectives and Outcomes 11

8.2 Key Competencies 13

9 Content: Preliminary Course 14

9.1 Overview of the Content 14

9.2 Part I: Case Studies 16

9.3 Part II: Historical Investigation 23

9.4 Part III: Core Study: The World at the Beginning of the Twentieth Century 24

10 Content: HSC Course 26

10.1 Part I: Core Study: World War I 1914–1919: A Source-based Study 26

10.2 Part II: National Studies 28

A Australia 1945–1983 29

B China 1927–1949 30

C Germany 1918–1939 31

D India 1919–1947 32

E Indonesia 1959–1998 33

F Japan 1904–1937 34

G Russia and the Soviet Union 1917–1941 35

H South Africa 1960–1994 36

I USA 1919–1941 37

10.3 Part III: Personalities in the Twentieth Century 38

1 Yasser Arafat 1929 to 2000 40

2 Joseph Benedict Chifley 1885–1951 41

3 Herbert Evatt 1894–1965 42

4 Mikhail Gorbachev 1931 to 2000 43

5 Emperor Hirohito 1901–1989 44

6 Ho Chi Minh 1890–1969 45

7 Kita Ikki 1883–1937 46

8 William Randolph Hearst 1863–1951 47

9 J Edgar Hoover 1895–1972 48

10 Mohammed Ali Jinnah 1876–1948 49

11 Alexandra Kollontai 1873–1952 50

12 Douglas MacArthur 1880–1964 51

13 Nelson Mandela 1918 to 2000 52

14 Golda Meir 1898–1978 53

15 Robert Gordon Menzies 1894–1978 54

16 Bernard Law Montgomery 1887–1976 55

17 Jawaharlal Nehru 1889–1964 56

18 Ian Paisley 1926 to 2000 57

19 Leni Riefenstahl 1902–2003 58

20 Eleanor Roosevelt 1884–1962 59

21 Albert Speer 1905–1981 60

22 Achmad Sukarno 1901–1970 61

23 Sun Yixian (Sun Yat-sen) 1866–1925 62

24 Leon Trotsky 1879–1940 63

25 Woodrow Wilson 1856–1924 64

26 Isoruku Yamamoto 1884–1943 65

27 Zhu De (Chu Teh) 1886–1976 66

10.4 Part IV: International Studies in Peace and Conflict 67

A Anglo-Irish Relations 1968–1998 68

B Conflict in Europe 1935–1945 69

C Conflict in Indochina 1954–1979 70

D Conflict in the Pacific 1937–1951 71

E The Arab–Israeli Conflict 1948–1996 72

F The Cold War 1945–1991 73

G The United Nations as Peacekeeper 1946–2001 74

11 Assessment and Reporting 75

12 Post-school Opportunities 76

13 Glossary 77



1 Background
The Higher School Certificate Program of Study
The purpose of the Higher School Certificate program of study is to:

  • provide a curriculum structure which encourages students to complete secondary education

  • foster the intellectual, social and moral development of students, in particular developing their:

  • knowledge, skills, understanding and attitudes in the fields of study they choose

  • capacity to manage their own learning

  • desire to continue learning in formal or informal settings after school

  • capacity to work together with others

  • respect for the cultural diversity of Australian society

  • provide a flexible structure within which students can prepare for:

  • further education and training

  • employment

  • full and active participation as citizens

  • provide formal assessment and certification of students’ achievements

  • provide a context within which schools also have the opportunity to foster students’ physical and spiritual development.


2 Rationale
The study of history is an inquiry into past human experience that helps make the present more intelligible. History has been described as a contested dialogue between past and present, where the concerns of the present illuminate a consideration of the past, while the experiences of the past contribute to an understanding of the present. The study of history allows students to perceive the world in a variety of ways as they develop powers of deduction and reasoning and learn to make sense of an increasingly complex global society.
The study of Modern History Stage 6 has a distinctive role in the school curriculum as it challenges students to consider the great social, technological, economic, political and moral transformations from the late eighteenth century to the present. It requires students to analyse the causes, progress and effects of these transformations and, finally, to make judgements about them. Modern History Stage 6 is especially relevant to the lives of students, as the events and issues that form its content are, in many cases, still current.
The study of Modern History Stage 6 also contributes to the development of skills that are of great importance in today’s workforce. The fluent communication of thoughts and ideas gleaned from the critical analysis of primary and secondary sources is a sought after skill. The ability to deconstruct texts and narratives, pose intelligent questions, test hypotheses and make critical use of information technologies is essential to living and working in the twenty-first century.
Within the Australian context, the knowledge, skills, values and attitudes acquired through a study of Modern History Stage 6 are essential ingredients in the promotion of a democratic, harmonious, progressive and tolerant society. Modern History Stage 6 helps empower students to become responsible and active citizens who will recognise the factors affecting change and continuity in human affairs. This broad understanding encourages students to develop an appreciation of different views and to be aware of how such views contribute to individual and group actions in various local, national and international contexts.

3 Continuum of Learning

HSIE K–6

Change and Continuity


Cultures




History Stage 4
Mandatory World
History
History Stage 5
Mandatory Australian
History
Elective History


Other Stage 4–5


Subjects

Other Stage 4–5
Subjects


Ancient History


Stage 6

Modern History
Stage 6










History Extension Stage 6


Workplace/University/TAFE/Other

In Stage 4 History (Mandatory) students are required to undertake an introductory unit Investigating History which explores the purpose and nature of history, the process used by historians to investigate and record the past and issues of heritage and conservation in relation to a study of the past. In Stage 4, all students undertake studies of Aboriginal and Indigenous Peoples, Colonisation and Contact History and have the optional study of Shaping the Modern World.
Stage 5 History (Mandatory) focuses on twentieth-century Australian history. Students continue to develop the skills of historical inquiry through this study. An understanding of
the Stages 4–5 (Mandatory) material is assumed knowledge for Modern History students in Stage 6.
4 Aim
Modern History Stage 6 is designed to enable students to acquire knowledge and understanding, the skills of critical analysis and synthesis, and values and attitudes essential to an appreciation of forces that have shaped the modern world; to develop a lifelong interest in the study of history; and to prepare them for informed and active citizenship in the contemporary world.


5 Objectives
Through the study of Modern History Stage 6 students will develop:
knowledge and understanding about:

1 key features, issues, individuals and events from the late eighteenth century to the present

2 change and continuity over time
skills to:

3 undertake the process of historical inquiry

4 communicate an understanding of history
and responsible values and attitudes about:

5 informed and active citizenship

6 a just society

7 the influence of the past on the present and the future

8 the contribution of historical studies to lifelong learning.


6 Course Requirements
For the Preliminary course:


  • 120 indicative hours are required to complete the course


For the HSC course:

  • the Preliminary course is a prerequisite

  • 120 indicative hours are required to complete the course.


7 Course Structure
Preliminary Course (120 indicative hours)
The Preliminary course is structured to provide students with opportunities to investigate key features, individuals, groups, events, concepts and historiographical issues in a range of historical contexts as background for their HSC studies.
Students are required to study Parts I, II and III of the course.
Part I: Case Studies – 50%

At least TWO case studies should be undertaken.

ONE case study must be from Europe, North America or Australia. List A on page 18 provides examples of these.

ONE case study must be from Asia, the Pacific, Africa, the Middle East or Central/South America. List B on page 18 provides examples of these.



Note: there is no prescribed length or time for each case study.
Part II: Historical Investigation – 20%

The investigation can be integrated into any aspect of the Preliminary course and need not be completed as one project. It may be conducted individually or as part of a group. The investigation must not overlap or duplicate significantly any topic attempted for the HSC Modern History or History Extension courses.


Further detail on the investigation is provided on page 23.
Part III: Core Study: The World at the Beginning of the Twentieth Century – 30%

Students will investigate the Preliminary core study using a source-based approach.



HSC Course (120 indicative hours)
Students are required to study Parts I, II, III and IV of the course.
Part I: Core Study: World War I 1914–1919: A Source-based Study 25% of course time
Part II: ONE National Study 25% of course time
Part III: ONE Personality in the Twentieth Century 25% of course time
Part IV: ONE International Study in Peace and Conflict 25% of course time



Preliminary Course

(120 indicative hours)

HSC Course

(120 indicative hours)

Part I: Case Studies – 50%

At least TWO case studies should be


undertaken.
ONE case study must be from Europe, North America or Australia. List A on page 18 provides examples of these.
ONE case study must be from Asia, the Pacific, Africa, the Middle East or Central/South America. List B on page 18 provides examples of these.
Part II: Historical Investigation – 20%

The investigation can be integrated into any aspect of the Preliminary course and need not be completed as one project. It may be conducted individually or as part of a group. The investigation must not overlap or duplicate significantly any topic attempted for the HSC Modern History or History Extension courses.


Part III: Core Study – 30%

The World at the Beginning of the Twentieth Century

Students will investigate the Preliminary core study using a source-based approach.


Part I: Core Study – 25%

World War I 1914–1919: A Source-based Study
Part II: National Studies – 25%

Choose ONE from those listed on page 28.



Part III: Personalities in the Twentieth Century – 25%

Choose ONE from those listed on page 39.



Part IV: International Studies in Peace and Conflict – 25%

Choose ONE from those listed on page 67.





8 Objectives and Outcomes
8.1 Objectives and Outcomes


Objectives
A student develops knowledge and understanding about:

Preliminary Course Outcomes

A student develops the skills to:

HSC Course Outcomes

A student develops the skills to:

1 key features, issues, individuals and events from the eighteenth century to the present

P1.1 describe the role of key individuals, groups and events of selected studies from the eighteenth century to the present

P1.2 investigate and explain the key features and issues of selected studies from the eighteenth century to the present



H1.1 describe the role of key features, issues, individuals, groups and events of selected twentieth-century studies

H1.2 analyse and evaluate the role of key features, issues, individuals, groups and events of selected twentieth-century studies



2 change and continuity over time


P2.1 identify forces and ideas and explain their significance in contributing to change and continuity from the eighteenth century to the present

H2.1 explain forces and ideas and assess their significance in contributing to change and continuity during the twentieth century

3 the process of historical inquiry

P3.1 ask relevant historical questions

P3.2 locate, select and organise relevant information from different types of sources

P3.3 comprehend and analyse sources for their usefulness and reliability

P3.4 identify and account for differing perspectives and interpretations of the past

P3.5 plan and present the findings of historical investigations, analysing and synthesising information from different types of sources


H3.1 ask relevant historical questions

H3.2 locate, select and organise relevant information from different types of sources

H3.3 analyse and evaluate sources for their usefulness and reliability

H3.4 explain and evaluate differing perspectives and interpretations of the past

H3.5 plan and present the findings of historical investigations, analysing and synthesising information from different types of sources


4 communicating an understanding of history

P4.1 use historical terms and concepts appropriately

P4.2 communicate a knowledge and understanding of historical features and issues, using appropriate and well-structured oral and written forms



H4.1 use historical terms and concepts appropriately

H4.2 communicate a knowledge and understanding of historical features and issues, using appropriate and well-structured oral and written forms





Values and Attitudes
Values and attitudes are inherent in the subject matter of Modern History Stage 6 and the skills that are developed in it. They result from learning experiences and reflection.
Students need to develop values and attitudes that promote a democratic and just society.


Objectives
A student develops values and attitudes about:


A student:

5 informed and active citizenship

  • demonstrates an appreciation of the nature of various democratic institutions

  • demonstrates an appreciation of the individual rights, freedoms and responsibilities of citizenship and democracy

  • demonstrates respect for different viewpoints, ways of living, belief systems and languages in the modern world

6 a just society

  • articulates concern for the welfare, rights and dignity of all people

  • displays a readiness to counter disadvantage and change racist, sexist and other discriminatory practices

  • demonstrates respect for human life

7 the influence of the past on the present and the future

  • demonstrates an awareness of the ways the past can inform and influence the present and the future

  • recognises the impact of contemporary national and global developments on countries and regions, lifestyles, issues, beliefs and institutions

8 the contribution of historical studies to lifelong learning

  • demonstrates an awareness of the contributions of historical studies to lifelong learning


8.2 Key Competencies
Modern History Stage 6 provides a powerful context within which to develop general competencies considered essential for the acquisition of effective, higher-order thinking skills necessary for further education, work and everyday life.
Key competencies are embedded in the Modern History Stage 6 Syllabus to enhance student learning.
The key competencies of collecting, analysing and organising information and communicating ideas and information reflect core processes of historical inquiry and are explicit in the objectives and outcomes of the syllabus.
The other key competencies are developed through the methodologies of the syllabus and through classroom pedagogy in the following ways:

  • students work as individuals and as members of groups to conduct historical investigations, and through this, the key competencies planning and organising activities and working with others and in teams are developed

  • when students construct timelines or analyse statistical evidence, they are developing the key competency using mathematical ideas and techniques

  • during investigations, students will need to use appropriate information technologies and so develop the key competency using technology

  • finally, the exploration of issues and the investigation of the nature of historical problems contribute towards students’ development of the key competency solving problems.


9 Content: Preliminary Course
9.1 Overview of the Content

The Preliminary course is structured to provide students with opportunities to investigate the role of key features, issues, individuals, groups, events and concepts from the eighteenth century to the present using the methods of historical inquiry.


When studying the Preliminary course students should have opportunities to investigate significant historiographical issues including:

  • the variety of primary and secondary sources available

  • the usefulness and reliability of the sources

  • the different perspectives and interpretations offered by the sources.

The Preliminary course comprises Part I: Case Studies, Part II: Historical Investigation, and Part III: Core Study: The World at the Beginning of the Twentieth Century.


Parts I, II and III of the Preliminary course can be studied in any order.
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