MO3210 American Revolutions: Ordinary Lives & Extraordinary Times Reading List Dr. Sarah Pearsall



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MO3210

American Revolutions: Ordinary Lives & Extraordinary Times

Reading List

Dr. Sarah Pearsall
These topics roughly correspond to those on the weekly discussion list, but there are some additions. These additional items might be used in your essays or in general revision. The astericks signify that those readings are essential for the class presentations. The double astericks refer to the reading that everyone should do even if they do nothing else that week. Otherwise, we will just have to sit there, silent and glum.
Back issues of key journals (William and Mary Quarterly, American Historical Review, and Journal of American History, among others) can be found online on networked computers, at http://www.jstor.ac.uk. Newer issues of WMQ and other journals can be found online at http://www.historycoop.org. Another useful online resource is the early American journal, Common-Place, at http://www.common-place.org

Introduction: The American Revolution and Its Background

Wood, Gordon S. The American Revolution: A History. London: Weidenfeld & Nicolson, 2003.


Cogliano, Frank. Revolutionary America, 1763-1815: A Political History. London: Routledge, 2000.
Brown, Richard D., ed. Major Problems in the Era of the American Revolution, 1760-1791. New York: D.C. Heath, 1991.
Bonwick, Colin. The American Revolution. London: Macmillan/Palgrave, 1991.
Cook, Don. The Long Fuse: How England Lost the American Colonies, 1760-1785: Atlantic Monthly Press, 1996.
Countryman, Edward. The American Revolution. New York: Penguin, 1991.
Henretta, James A., Michael Kammen, and Stanley Katz. The Transformation of Early American History: Society, Authority, and Ideology. New York, 1991.
Royster, Charles. The Fabulous History of the Dismal Swamp Company: A Story of George Washington’s Times . New York: Vintage, 2000.
Royster, Charles, and Ian Barnes, eds. A Historical Atlas of the American Revolution. London: Routledge, 2000.
Greene, Jack P. ed. The American Revolution: Its Character and Limits. (New York: New York University, 1987.)

Week 2: The Coming of the Revolution

**Selected Political Documents from 1765-1775 from Beloff, Max. The Debate of the American Revolution, 1761-1783. Second ed. London: Adam & Charles Black, 1960. (PACKET)


**Bailyn, Bernard. The Ideological Origins of the American Revolution. Enlarged ed. Cambridge, Massachusetts: Harvard University Press, 1992.
*Nash, Gary B. The Urban Crucible: The Northern Seaports and the Origins of the American Revolution. Abridged ed. Cambridge, Massachusetts: Harvard University Press, 1986.
Breen, T. H. Tobacco Culture: The Mentality of the Great Tidewater Planters on the Eve of the Revolution. Princeton, New Jersey: Princeton University Press, 1985.
________. “‘Baubles of Britain’: The American and Consumer Revolutions of the Eighteenth Century.” In Diversity and Unity in Early North America, ed. Philip D. Morgan, 227-256. London: Routledge, 1993.
________. “Ideology and Nationalism on the Eve of the American Revolution: Revisions Once More in Need of Revising.” Journal of American History 84 (1997): 13-39.

http://links.jstor.org/sici?sici=0021-8723%28199706%2984%3A1%3C13%3AIANOTE%3E2.0.CO%3B2-I
———. “Narrative of Commercial Life: Consumption, Ideology, and Community on the Eve of the American Revolution.” William and Mary Quarterly 50 (1993): 471-501.

http://links.jstor.org/sici?sici=0043-5597%28199307%293%3A50%3A3%3C471%3ANOCLCI%3E2.0.CO%3B2-E
Butler, Jon. Becoming America: The Revolution before 1776. Cambridge, Massachusetts: Harvard University Press, 2000.
Appleby, Joyce. “The Social Origins of American Revolutionary Ideology.” Journal of American History 64 (1978): 935-958.

http://links.jstor.org/sici?sici=0021-8723%28197803%2964%3A4%3C935%3ATSOOAR%3E2.0.CO%3B2-B
Anderson, Fred. A People’s Army: Massachusetts Soldiers and Society in the Seven Years’ War. New York: W. W. Norton & Company, 1984.
Bonomi, Patricia. Under the Cope of Heaven: Religion, Society, and Politics in Colonial America. New York: Oxford University Press, 1986, Part II.
Davidson, Cathy N. Revolution and the Word: The Rise of the Novel in America. New York: Oxford University Press, 1986.
Thompson, Peter. Rum Punch & Revolution: Taverngoing & Public Life in Eighteenth-Century Philadelphia. Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press, 1999.
Maier, Pauline. From Resistance to Revolution: Colonial Radicals and the Development of American Opposition to Britain, 1765-1776. (New York: Knopf, 1972).

Week 3: Declaring Independence

**Maier, Pauline ed. The Declaration of Independence and the Constitution of the United States : With Index  . New York: Bantam Books, 1998. Declaration. Or at:



http://www.archives.gov/national_archives_experience/declaration_transcript.html
**See also:

http://memory.loc.gov/cgi-bin/query/D?bds:164:./temp/~const_n0Xe::
**Paine, Thomas. Common Sense (1776) in Michael Foot and Isaac Kramnick, eds. The Thomas Paine Reader (London: Penguin, 1987). Or in Thomas Paine. Common Sense. Ed. Isaac Kramnick. (Penguin, 1976). (PACKET)
*Maier, Pauline. American Scripture. New York: Vintage, 1998. First half.
Ellis, Joseph P., ed. What Did the Declaration Declare? London: St. Martin’s Press, 1999.
Ferguson, Robert A. American Enlightenment, 1750-1820. Cambridge, Massachusetts: Harvard University Press, 1997.
Fliegelman, Jay. Declaring Independence: Jefferson, Natural Language, and the Culture of Performance. Stanford, California: Stanford University Press, 1993.
Jayne, Allen. Jefferson’s Declaration of Independence: Origins, Philosophy,

and Theology. Lexington: University of Kentucky, 1998.
Jefferson, Thomas. Thomas Jefferson : Writings : Autobiography / Notes on the State of Virginia / Public and Private Papers / Addresses / Letters, ed. Merrill D. Peterson. New York: Viking, 1984.
Wills, Garry. Inventing America: Jefferson's Declaration of Independence. New York: Doubleday, 1978.
Kaplan, Sidney. “The Domestic Insurrections of the Declaration of Independence.” Journal of Negro History 61 (1976): 243-255.

http://links.jstor.org/sici?sici=0022-2992%28197607%2961%3A3%3C243%3AT%22IOTD%3E2.0.CO%3B2-D

Week 4: “The Miseries of Civil dissentions”



**Assorted Loyalist Letters (PACKET) and following websites:

  • http://memory.loc.gov/cgi-bin/query/D?bds:181:./temp/~const_n0Xe::

  • http://memory.loc.gov/cgi-bin/query/D?bds:21:./temp/~const_n0Xe::

  • http://memory.loc.gov/cgi-bin/query/D?bds:36:./temp/~const_n0Xe::

  • http://links.jstor.org/sici?sici=0043-5597%28192101%292%3A1%3A1%3C70%3APOAL1%3E2.0.CO%3B2-5


and one other book for this week
**Calhoon, Robert M. The Loyalists in Revolutionary America, 1760-1781. New York: Harcourt Brace Jovanovich, 1973.
Bailyn, Bernard. Faces of Revolution: Personalities and Themes in the Struggle

for American Independence. New York: Vintage, 1990.
Calhoon, Robert M., Timothy M. Barnes, and George A. Rawlyk, eds. Loyalists and Community in North America. Westport, Connecticut: Greenwood Press, 1994.
Higginbotham, Don. War and Society in Revolutionary America: The Wider Dimensions of Conflict. Columbia: University of South Carolina Press, 1988.
Kerber, Linda K. “The Paradox of Women’s Citizenship in the Early Republic: The Case of Martin vs. Massachusetts, 1805.” In Toward an Intellectual History of Women, 261-302. Chapel Hill, North Carolina: University of North Carolina Press, 1997.
Kierner, Cynthia. Southern Women in Revolution, 1776-1800: Personal and Political Narratives. Columbia, South Carolina: University of South Carolina Press, 1998.
Moore, Christopher. The Loyalists: Revolution, Exile, Settlement. Toronto: Macmillan of Canada, 1984.
Norton, Mary Beth. The British-Americans: The Loyalist Exiles in England, 1774-1789. Boston: Little, Brown and Company, 1972.
________. “Eighteenth-Century American Women in Peace and War: The Case of the Loyalists.” William & Mary Quarterly 33, no. 3 (1976): 386-409.

http://links.jstor.org/sici?sici=0043-5597%28197607%293%3A33%3A3%3C386%3AEAWIPA%3E2.0.CO%3B2-H
________. “The Fate of Some Black Loyalists of the American Revolution.” Journal of Negro History 58 (1973): 402-426.

http://links.jstor.org/sici?sici=0022-2992%28197310%2958%3A4%3C402%3ATFOSBL%3E2.0.CO%3B2-D
Royster, Charles. A Revolutionary People at War. Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 1996.
Skemp, Sheila. Benjamin and William Franklin: Father and Son, Patriot and Loyalist. Boston, 1994.
Wright, Esmond, ed. Red, White and True Blue: The Loyalists in the Revolution. New York: AMS Press, 1976.
Mayer, Holly A. Belonging to the Army: Camp Followers and Community during the American Revolution. Columbia: University of South Carolina Press, 1996.
Smith, Paul H. “The American Loyalists: Notes on Their Organization and Numerical Strength.” William and Mary Quarterly 25 (1968).

http://links.jstor.org/sici?sici=0043-5597%28196804%293%3A25%3A2%3C259%3ATALNOT%3E2.0.CO%3B2-T

Week 5: Liberty and Slavery: The American Paradox

**Documents on Slavery and Revolution: http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/aia/part2/index.html



(see separate hand-out)
**Frey, Sylvia R. Water from the Rock: Black Resistance in a Revolutionary Age. Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1991.
*Berlin, Ira. Many Thousands Gone: The First Two Centuries of Slavery in North America. Cambridge, Massachusetts: Harvard University Press, 1998.
Quarles, Benjamin. The Negro in the American Revolution. Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 1961.
Morgan, Edmund S. American Slavery, American Freedom: The Ordeal of Colonial Virginia. New York: W. W. Norton & Company, 1975. Introduction.
Crow, Jeffrey. “Slave Rebelliousness and Social Conflict in North Carolina, 1775-1802.” William and Mary Quarterly 37 (1980): 80-102.

http://links.jstor.org/sici?sici=0043-5597%28198001%293%3A37%3A1%3C79%3ASRASCI%3E2.0.CO%3B2-6
Davis, David Brion. The Problem of Slavery in the Age of Revolution. Ithaca, New York: Cornell University Press, 1975.
Berlin, Ira and Ronald Hoffman, eds. Slavery and Freedom in the Age of the American Revolution. Urbana: University of Illinois Press, 1986.
Isaac, Rhys. The Transformation of Virginia, 1740-1790. Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina for the Institute of Early American History and Culture, 1982.
Linebaugh, Peter, and Marcus Rediker. The Many-Headed Hydra: Sailors, Slaves, Commoners, and the Hidden History of the Revolutionary Atlantic. Boston: Beacon Press, 2000.
Melish, Joanne Pope. Disowning Slavery: Gradual Emancipation and Race in New England, 1780-1860. Ithaca: Cornell University Press, 2000.
Nash, Gary B. Race and Revolution The Merrill Jensen Lectures in Constitutional Studies. Madison: Madison House, 1990.
Nash, Gary B. Forging Freedom: The Formation of Philadelphia's Black Community, 1720-1840. Cambridge, Massachusetts: Harvard University Press, 1988.
Breen, T. H “Making History: The Force of Public Opinion and the Last Years of Slavery in Revolutionary Massachusetts.” In Through a Glass Darkly: Reflections on Personal Identity in Early America, edited by Ronald Hoffman, Mechal Sobel and Fredrika J. Teute, 67-95. Chapel Hill, North Carolina: Omohundro Institute of Early American History and Culture by the University of North Carolina Press, 1997.
Kaminski, John P. A Necessary Evil?: Slavery and the Debate over the Constitution. Madion, Wisconsin: Madison House, 1995.
Week 6: Looking West
**Assorted Documents on Native Americans and conflict, including: http://memory.loc.gov/cgi-bin/query/D?bds:116:./temp/~const_n0Xe::

http://memory.loc.gov/cgi-bin/query/D?bds:157:./temp/~const_n0Xe::

http://memory.loc.gov/cgi-bin/query/D?bds:180:./temp/~const_n0Xe::

http://memory.loc.gov/cgi-bin/query/D?bds:165:./temp/~const_n0Xe::

http://memory.loc.gov/cgi-bin/query/D?bds:145:./temp/~const_n0Xe::

http://memory.loc.gov/cgi-bin/query/D?bds:147:./temp/~const_n0Xe::

http://memory.loc.gov/cgi-bin/query/D?bds:109:./temp/~const_n0Xe::
**Calloway. Colin. The American Revolution in Indian Country: Crisis and Diversity in Native American Communities. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1995.
* Dowd, Gregory. A Spirited Resistance: The Native American Struggle for Unity, 1745-1815. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 1992.
Countryman, Edward. “Indians, the Colonial Order, and the Social Significance of the American Revolution.” William and Mary Quarterly 53 (1996): 342-362.

http://links.jstor.org/sici?sici=0043-5597%28199604%293%3A53%3A2%3C342%3AITCOAT%3E2.0.CO%3B2-8
Hatley, Tom. The Dividing Paths: Cherokees and South Carolinians through the Revolutionary Era. New York: Oxford University Press, 1995.
Merrell, James H. The Indians’ New World: Catawbas and Their Neighbors from European Contact through the Era of Removal. New York: W. W. Norton & Company, 1989.
White, Richard. The Middle Ground: Indians, Empires, and Republics in the Great Lakes Region, 1650-1815 Cambridge Studies in North American Indian History, ed. Frederick Hoxie and Neal Salisbury. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1991. Final section.
Slaughter, Thomas P. The Whiskey Rebellion: Frontier Epilogue to the American Revolution. New York, 1986. (on order?)
Szatmary, David P. Shays’ Rebellion: The Making of an Agrarian Insurrection. Amherst: University of Massachusetts Press, 1980.
*Richards, Leonard L. Shays’s Rebellion: The American Revolution’s Final Battle. (Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press, 2002).
Brooke, John L. “To the Quiet of the People: Revolutionary Settlements and Civil Unrest in Western Massachusetts, 1774-1789.” William and Mary Quarterly 46 (1989): 425-462.

http://links.jstor.org/sici?sici=0043-5597%28198907%293%3A46%3A3%3C425%3ATTQOTP%3E2.0.CO%3B2-Y
Brown, Richard D. “Shays' Rebellion and its Aftermath: A View from Springfield, Massachusetts, 1787.” William and Mary Quarterly 40 (1983): 598-615.

http://links.jstor.org/sici?sici=0043-5597%28198310%293%3A40%3A4%3C598%3ASRAIAA%3E2.0.CO%3B2-9
Gross, Robert A. “White Hats and Hemlocks: Daniel Shays and the Legacy of the Revolution.” In The Transforming Hand of Revolution: Reconsidering the American Revolution as a Social Movement, edited by Ronald Hoffman and Peter Albert. Charlottesville: University Press of Virginia, 1995
Week 7: Forging a Constitution
**Maier, Pauline, ed. The Declaration of Independence and the Constitution of the United States : With Index. New York: Bantam Books, 1998. Constitution. Or:

http://www.archives.gov/national_archives_experience/constitution_transcript.html
**Selected documents from Kammen, Michael, ed. The Origins of the American Constitution: A Documentary History, (London: Penguin, 1986). (PACKET)
** Special Issue on the Constitution, Common-place (online journal) at:

http://www.common-place.org/vol-02/no-04/roundtable/
**Madison, James, Alexander Hamilton, and John Jay. The Federalist Papers, ed. Isaac Kramnick. New York: Penguin, 1987 or http://memory.loc.gov/const/fed/fedpapers.html
*Bailyn, Bernard, ed. The Debate on the Constitution. New York: Viking, 1993.
Kaminski, John P., and Richard Lefler, eds. Federalists and Antifederalists: The Debate over the Ratification of the Constitution. second ed. Madison: Madison House, 1998.
Wood, Gordon S. The Creation of the American Republic, 1776-1787. Chapel Hill, North Carolina: University of North Carolina Press, 1969.
Countryman, Edward, ed. What Did the Constitution Mean to Early Americans? London: Macmillan/Palgrave, 1999.
Hutson, James H. “Riddles of the Federal Constitutional Convention.” William and Mary Quarterly 44 (1987): 411-423.

http://links.jstor.org/sici?sici=0043-5597%28198707%293%3A44%3A3%3C411%3AROTFCC%3E2.0.CO%3B2-Z
Kramnick, Isaac. “The Great National Discussion: The Discourse of Politics in 1787.” William and Mary Quarterly 45 (1988): 3-32.

http://links.jstor.org/sici?sici=0043-5597%28198801%293%3A45%3A1%3C3%3AT%22NDTD%3E2.0.CO%3B2-A
Onuf, Peter S. “Reflections on the Founding: Constitutional Historiography in Bincentennial Perspective.” William and Mary Quarterly 46 (1989): 341-375.

http://links.jstor.org/sici?sici=0043-5597%28198904%293%3A46%3A2%3C341%3AROTFCH%3E2.0.CO%3B2-E
Rakove, Jack N. “The Great Compromise: Ideas, Interests, and the Politics of Constitution Making.” William and Mary Quarterly 44 (1987): 424-457.

http://links.jstor.org/sici?sici=0043-5597%28198707%293%3A44%3A3%3C424%3ATGCIIA%3E2.0.CO%3B2-M
Kaminski, John P. A Necessary Evil?: Slavery and the Debate over the Constitution. Madion, Wisconsin: Madison House, 1995.
Week 8: The Rights of Man and Woman
**Murray, Judith Sargent. “On the Equality of the Sexes,” in Sharon D. Harris, Selected Writings of Judith Sargent Murray (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1995) (PACKET).
**Lewis, Jan E. “A Revolution for Whom? Women in the Era of the American Revolution.” A Companion to American Women’s History. Ed. Nancy A. Hewitt. Oxford: Blackwell, 2002. (PACKET)
**Crane, Elaine Forman. “Political Dialogue and the Spring of Abigail’s Discontent.” William and Mary Quarterly 56 (1999): 745-774.

Stable URL: http://links.jstor.org/sici?sici=0043-5597%28199910%293%3A56%3A4%3C745%3APDATSO%3E2.0.CO%3B2-N


**Zagarri, Rosemary. “The Rights of Man and Woman in Post-Revolutionary America.” William and Mary Quarterly 55, no. 2 (1998): 203-230.

Stable URL: http://links.jstor.org/sici?sici=0043-5597%28199804%293%3A55%3A2%3C203%3ATROMAW%3E2.0.CO%3B2-T


*Kerber, Linda K. Women of the Republic: Intellect & Ideology in Revolutionary America. New York: W. W. Norton & Company, 1980.
*Zagarri, Rosemarie. “Morals, Manners, and the Republican Mother.” American Quarterly 44, no. 2 (1992): 192-215.

Stable URL: http://links.jstor.org/sici?sici=0003-0678%28199206%2944%3A2%3C192%3AMMATRM%3E2.0.CO%3B2-5


*Lewis, Jan. “The Republican Wife: Virtue and Seduction in the Early Republic.” William and Mary Quarterly 44, no. 4 (1987): 689-721.

Stable URL: http://links.jstor.org/sici?sici=0043-5597%28198710%293%3A44%3A4%3C689%3ATRWVAS%3E2.0.CO%3B2-Q


Norton, Mary Beth. Liberty’s Daughters; the Revolutionary Experience of American Women, 1750-1800. Ithaca, New York: New York University, 1996.
Allgor, Catherine. Parlor Politics: In Which the Ladies of Washington Help Build a City and a Government. Charlottesville: University Press of Virginia, 1998.
Bloch, Ruth H. “The Gendered Meaning of Virtue in Revolutionary America.” Signs 13, no. 1 (1987): 37-58.
Branson, Susan. These Fiery Frenchified Dames: Women and Political Culture in Early National Philadelphia. Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press, 2001.
Cott, Nancy F. “Divorce and the Changing Status of Women in Eighteenth-Century Massachusetts.” William and Mary Quarterly, (1976): 586-614.

http://links.jstor.org/sici?sici=00435597%28197610%293%3A33%3A4%3C586%3ADATCSO%3E2.0.CO%3B2-B
Fliegelman, Jay. Prodigals and Pilgrims: The American Revolution against Patriarchal Authority, 1750-1800. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1982.
Gunderson, Joan R. “Independence, Citizenship, and the American Revolution.” Signs 13, no. 1 (1987): 59-77.
Hoffman, Ronald, and Peter J. Albert, eds. Women in the Age of the American Revolution. Perspectives on the American Revolution. Charlottesville, Virginia: The University Press of Virginia, 1989.
Juster, Susan. Disorderly Women: Sexual Politics & Evangelism in Revolutionary New England. Ithaca, New York: Cornell University Press, 1994.
Week 9: Founding Fathers
**Monticello (and Related) Websites:

General: http://www.monticello.org/ See especially:



http://www.monticello.org/plantation/hemingscontro/hemings-jefferson_contro.html

and http://www.monticello.org/plantation/hemingscontro/hemings_report.html



(links here are also useful)
**Lewis, Jan, et al. “Forum: Thomas Jefferson and Sally Hemmings Redux.” William and Mary Quarterly 57:1 (2000): 121-210. Begins with:

http://links.jstor.org/sici?sici=0043-5597%28200001%293%3A57%3A1%3C121%3AI%3E2.0.CO%3B2-A
*Gordon-Reed, Annette. Thomas Jefferson and Sally Hemings: An American Controversy. Charlottesville: University Press of Virginia, 1997.
*Lewis, Jan, and Peter S. Onuf. Sally Hemings and Thomas Jefferson: History, Memory, and Civic Culture. Charlottesville: University Press of Virginia, 1993.
Jefferson, Thomas. Notes on the State of Virginia, ed. Frank Shuffleton. New York: Penguin, 2000. Or in Writings (see above)
Cappon, Lester J., ed. The Adams-Jefferson Letters: The Complete Correspondence between Thomas Jefferson and Abigail and John Adams. Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press.
Burstein, Andrew. The Inner Jefferson: Portrait of a Grieving Optimist. Charlottesville: University Press of Virginia, 1995.
Ellis, Joseph. American Sphinx: The Character of Thomas Jefferson. New York: Knopf, 1997.
Fliegelman, Jay. Declaring Independence: Jefferson, Natural Language, and the Culture of Performance. Stanford, California: Stanford University Press, 1993.
Freeman, Joanne B. “Duelling as Politics: Reinterpreting the Burr-Hamilton Duel.” William and Mary Quarterly 43 (1996).

http://links.jstor.org/sici?sici=0043-5597%28199604%293%3A53%3A2%3C289%3ADAPRTB%3E2.0.CO%3B2-S
________. Affairs of Honor: National Politics in the New Republic. New Haven: Yale University Press, 2001. E310.F8
Higginbotham, Don, ed. George Washington Reconsidered. Charlottesville: University Press of Virginia, 2001.
Branson, Susan. These Fiery Frenchified Dames: Women and Political Culture in Early National Philadelphia. Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press, 2001.
Week 10: Memory and Identity
**Early commemoration documents. See:

http://memory.loc.gov/cgi-bin/query/D?bds:23:./temp/~const_Alzm::

http://memory.loc.gov/cgi-bin/query/D?bds:49:./temp/~const_n0Xe::
**Young, Alfred F. The Shoemaker and the Tea Party: Memory and the American Revolution. Boston: Beacon Press, 1999.
*Waldstreicher, David. In the Midst of Perpetual Fetes: The Making of American Nationalism, 1776-1820. Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press for the Omohundro Institute of Early American History and Culture, 1997.
Dann, John C., ed. The Revolution Remembered: Eyewitness Accounts of the War for Independence. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1980
Newman, Simon. Parades and the Politics of the Street: Festive Culture in the Early American Republic. Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press, 1997.
Travers, Len. Celebrating the Fourth: Independence Day and the Rites of

Nationalism in the Early Republic. Amherst: University of Massachusetts Press, 1997.
Appleby, Joyce. Inheriting the Revolution: The First Generation of Americans. Cambridge, Massachusetts: Belknap, 2000.
Week 11: The Radicalism of the American Revolution
**Wood, Gordon S. The Radicalism of the American Revolution. New York: Vintage, 1990.
**“Forum: How Revolutionary Was the Revolution? A Discussion of Gordon S. Wood's The Radicalism of the American Revolution.” William and Mary Quarterly, 51: 4 (1994): 677-716.

Begins with:



http://links.jstor.org/sici?sici=0043-5597%28199410%293%3A51%3A4%3C677%3ATROTAR%3E2.0.CO%3B2-J
*Linebaugh, Peter, and Marcus Rediker. The Many-Headed Hydra: Sailors, Slaves, Commoners, and the Hidden History of the Revolutionary Atlantic. Boston: Beacon Press, 2000.
O’Shaughnessy, Andrew Jackson. An Empire Divided: The American Revolution and the British Caribbean. Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press, 2000.
Butler, Jon. Becoming America: The Revolution before 1776. Cambridge, Massachusetts: Harvard University Press, 2000.
Langley, Lester D. The Americas in the Age of Revolution, 1750-1850. New Haven: Yale University Press, 1996.
Henretta, James A., Michael Kammen, and Stanley Katz. The Transformation of Early American History: Society, Authority, and Ideology. New York, 1991.
Hoffman, Ronald, and Peter Albert, eds. The Transforming Hand of Revolution: Reconsidering the American Revolution as a Social Movement. Charlottesville: University of Virginia Press, 1995.
Isaac, Rhys. The Transformation of Virginia, 1740-1790. Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina for the Institute of Early American History and Culture, 1982.
Lewis, Jan. The Pursuit of Happiness: Family and Values in Jefferson’s Virginia. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1983.
Young, Alfred, ed. The American Revolution: Explorations in the History of American Radicalism. Dekalb, Ill, 1976.






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