Minnesota and tangaza university college, nairobi



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MIASMU Course Offerings 2004



MARYKNOLL INSTITUTE OF AFRICAN

STUDIES OF SAINT MARY’S UNIVERSITY OF

MINNESOTA AND TANGAZA UNIVERSITY COLLEGE, NAIROBI

MIAS
2015/2016


COURSE


CATALOGUE


NAIROBI, KENYA

MARYKNOLL INSTITUTE OF AFRICAN STUDIES


SPONSORED

BY THE

AFRICA AREA OF THE

MARYKNOLL FATHERS AND BROTHERS

AND

ACADEMICALLY AFFILIATED

WITH

SAINT MARY'S UNIVERSITY

OF MINNESOTA/USA

AND

TANGAZA UNIVERSITY COLLEGE

NAIROBI, KENYA




P. O. BOX 15199 Lang’ata, 00509, KENYA


MOBILE PHONE (254- 726) 818-917/ (254-732) 818-917

E-MAIL: miasmu@tangaza.org

Website http://www.mias.edu


INDEX
Field Research Principles and Practice (Foundational) 3
Field Research Principles and Practice (Advanced) 4
African Cultures: An Overview 5
African Traditional Religion Interprets the Bible 7
African Feminist/Womanist Theology: A Source for African

Christian Theology 8


Sociology of Development/Underdevelopment and African Religion 9
Contemporary Political and Economic Realities in Kenya 11
Introduction to East African Art: its Secular and Religious Themes 13
Towards the Inculturation of Religious Community Life in Africa 15

African Christian Theology: Historical and Systematic Development 16


Gospel and Culture: The African Experience 17
African Traditional Religion: Major Beliefs, Practices,

and Contemporary Forms 19


African Marriage and Family: Challenge and Change 21
Introduction to East African Literature: Focus on

Religious Conflicts 23


Spirituality, Personhood and Psychotherapy in an African Context 25
Justice and Peace in East Africa 26
Introduction to Islam in East Africa 27
Ideology and Practice of Health Ministry in Contemporary

Africa: Traditional and Western 28


Church in Contemporary Africa: Social, Political and

Economic Situation 30


African Independent Churches: Authentic Integration with or

Separation from Christianity 32


Sage Philosophy: The Root of African Philosophy and Religion 34
Moral Teachings and Practices of African Traditional Religion 36
MA Thesis (Master of Arts in African Studies) 37
MAS Essay (Master of African Studies) 38
MIAS Faculty List 39

Course: MARY AFST 506:Research Principles and Practice: Foundational

(Students in their first to third courses)
Dates: Taught in all programs as an integral part of each course. The course is designed for students in their first three courses.

Research training:

This dimension of the program is designed to train students how to do professional field research on the issues pertinent to the particular courses they are taking. The research is facilitated by University students who are assigned to each participant on a one-to-one basis and function as their field assistants. The research is intertwined with all courses being taught each session. It is under the direction of the professors teaching the courses.


Research elements:

  1. Three workshops on how to do research, work efficiently with a field assistant, and analyze collected data.

  2. Three sessions each week for three weeks in the Immersion programs, one session each week for twelve weeks in the Semester programs doing field research in and about Nairobi (with the field assistants, and under the guidance of the professors) on situations and issues relevant to the materials being taught in the classroom.

  3. Reports to the class on the field research.

  4. Integration of the data collected from the research into the final papers required for the courses.

  5. A written skill evaluation exam measuring one’s comprehension of research methods and techniques.



TEXT BOOK

Spradley, James P. (1980). Participant Observation. New York: Holt, Rinehart and Winston.




BIBLIOGRAPHY

Bernard, Russell H. (1994). Research Methods in Anthropology: Qualitative and Quantitative Approaches. Second Edition. Sage Publications Inc.

Crane, G. and Michael V. (1974). Angrosino. Field Projects in Anthropology, (A Student Handbook. Illinois/London: Scott, Forsman and Company, Glenview.
Leach, Edmund. (1976). Culture and Communication: The Logic by Which Symbols Are Connected: An introduction to the Use of Structuralist Analysis in Social Anthropology. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
Kirwen, Michael. (Ed.). (1978). Theology of Luo Sacrifice. Unpublished paper. Available through the MIASMU program, c/o M. Kirwen, Box 15199 Lang’ata, 00509,Kenya.

Course: MARY AFST 508:Field Research Principles and Practice: Advanced

(Students in their fourth to sixth courses)
Dates: Taught in all programs as an integral part of each course. The course is designed for students in their fourth to sixth course.
Research overview:

This dimension of the program is designed to further develop the research skills of students who have participated in the previous years. Like the foundational dimension, this training is intertwined with courses being taught each session and is under the direction of the professors teaching the courses.


Research elements for advanced level:

  1. Three workshops on how to intensify one's field research, work more efficiently with a field assistant, and do in-depth analysis of collected data.

  2. Three sessions each week for three weeks in the Immersion programs, and one session each week for twelve weeks in the Semester programs doing field research in and about Nairobi under the guidance of the professors on situations and issues relevant to the materials being taught in the classroom.

  3. A weekly written research report.

  4. Integration of the data collected from the research into the final papers required for the courses.

  5. A written skill evaluation advanced test measuring one's comprehension of research techniques and methods.



TEXT BOOKS:

Benard, Russell H. (1994). Research Methods in Anthropology: Qualitative and Quantitative Approaches Second Edition. Sage Publications Inc.




BIBLIOGRAPHY

Spradley, James P. (1980). Participant Observation. New York: Holt, Rinehart and Winston.


Crane, G. and Michael V. Angrosino. (1974). Field Projects in Anthropology, (A Student Handbook. Illinois/London: Scott, Forsman and Company, Glenview.
Leach, Edmund. (1976). Culture and Communication: The Logic by Which Symbols Are Connected: An introduction to the Use of Structuralist Analysis in Social Anthropology. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
Kirwen, Michael. (1978). Theology of Luo Sacrifice. Unpublished paper. Available through the MIASMU program, c/o M. Kirwen, Box 15199 Lang’ata, 00509, Kenya.
Course: MAY AFST 510: African Cultures: An Overview Course Overview:

The course is a systematic presentation of African Cultural Heritage. It is a required course for Master degree and Diploma programs and is offered in both the semester and immersion programs.


Course Description:

This course gives an overview of the African traditional cultures by studying some of the significant aspects of these cultures. Some of the aspects studied are: social groupings, supernatural beliefs, religious systems, communication systems, political systems, economic systems, education system, health systems and rites of passage. Special attention is given to the traditional features of these aspects, though the contemporary changes affecting them are also mentioned. Special attention is also given to the challenges these cultures pose to Christians in Africa.


Purpose:

The purpose of the course is to help the students understand the African traditional cultures. Such an understanding would help the student to understand African people better; live and work with African people more effectively and even make the student appreciate more the African ways of life.


Objectives:

In order for the students to reach the purpose of the course at the end of the course the students shall be able to:




  1. List some of the significant aspects of the African traditional cultures.

  2. Describe in detail one aspect of the African culture mentioning such things as: features, functions, changes and challenges this aspect poses to Christians in Africa.

  3. Participate in several actual African experiences in a family or community activity. Each student is assigned a local field assistant to help in this regard.

  4. Write a fifteen-page research paper that incorporates materials from classroom lectures, assigned readings, field experiences and personal reactions as the conclusion.

  5. Organize the materials of this course in lecture forms that the student can teach other students in future.


Requirements:

To meet the objectives of the course, the following things are necessary:



  1. Regular and punctual class attendance.

  2. Reading bibliographical material for each class lecture. There are eighteen lectures, for the immersion programs and twenty-four for the semester programs.

  3. Doing field research each week. There are nine field researches for the immersion programs and ten for the semester programs.

  4. Turning in a report for each field experience.

  5. Writing a fifteen-page research integration paper per course.



SELECTED TEXT BOOKS
Ayisi, E.O. (1972). An Introduction to African Culture. London: Heinemann.
Gyekye, K. (1996). African Cultural Values: An Introduction. Philadelphia: Sankofa Publishing Company.
Hiebert, P.G. (1983). Cultural Anthropology. (2nded.). Grand Rapids: Baker House.
Kenyatta, J. (1978). Facing Mount Kenya. Nairobi: Heinemann
Magesa, L. (1998). African Religion: The Moral Traditions of Abundant Life. Nairobi: Paulines Publications Africa.

Mbiti, J.S. (1975). Introduction to African Religion. New York: Praeger.


Onwuejeogwu, M.A. (1975). Social Anthropology of Africa. London: Heinemann.
Shorter, A. (1998). African Culture, An Overview: Socio-cultural anthropology. Nairobi: Paulines Publications Africa.

Course: MARY AFST 546: African Traditional Religion Interprets the Bible.
Course overview:

The course investigates the underlying basic requirements of a truly African method of interpreting the Bible and compares it with the Historical Critical Method. The aim of the course is to guide the students to appropriate an authentic African exegesis of the Bible in order that they might proclaim its message in symbols and values that are immediate to Africans.


Course Description:

Most Bible commentaries and everyday written exposition of scriptural texts generally presuppose European and North American cultural thought patterns. This is quite evident in the much-accepted historical critical method. As an alternative to this way of interpretation, this course will offer students a chance to investigate the African way of understanding biblical culture and milieu in terms of African culture and milieu. It investigates whether it is possible to arrive at concrete African hermeneutic principles. It asks how Africans read the Bible and profitably inculturate the ever-enduring biblical message into their existential situation without an historical critique of the biblical settings. It asks what Africans understand the Bible to say on issues such as: Marriage and the Family, African Contemporary Culture, Bride wealth, Rites of Passage, Death and Rites of Incorporation into life after death.


The students will seek to find out how Africans read and interpret the Bible through field research involving participation, observation and interviews in the following situations:

- Street preaching

- Independent and Pentecostal Services

- Mainline church services

- Bible colleges

- Bible unions in schools

- Campus ministries, including New Age Religions

- Scripture professors

This will be contrasted with the Historical Critical Method as applied to specific biblical passages.

TEXT BOOKS:

Dickson, K.A. (1969). Biblical Revelation and African Beliefs. New York: Orbis Books.


Mbiti, J.S. (1986). Bible and Theology: In African Christianity. Nairobi: Oxford University Press.
Mugambi, J.N.K and Laurenti Magesa. (Eds). (1989). Jesus in African Christianity: Experimentation and Diversity in African Christology. Nairobi: Initiative Publishers.
Shorter, A. (1973).African Culture and the Christian Church. London: Geoffrey Chapman.
Shorter, A. (1975). African Christian Theology. London: Geoffrey Chapman.

ATTN: This course can substituted for the course on African Traditional Religion: Major Beliefs, Practices and Contemporary Forms, a required course for students registered in the Master degree programs.

Course: MARY AFST 542: African Feminist/Womanist Theology: A Source for African Christian Theology
Course Overview:

Feminist theology as a source for African Christian Theology. Besides the classroom lectures, there will be thirty hours of directed field research.


Course Description:

The class commences with a brief historical survey of womanist theology as a liberating theology including its origin, development and spread around the world. Then the class will analyze the challenge womanist theology poses for African culture and African religious tradition and how womanist theology could be a tool for recapturing the African values e.g. that of holistic approach to human life in relation to the divine and the cosmos.


SELECTED BIBLIOGRAPHY.
Fabella, V. and Oduyoye, M. A. (Eds). (1988). With Passion and Compassion: Third World Women Doing Theology. New York: Orbis Books,
Fabella V. & Martinez D. (Eds). (1986). Third world Women Doing Theology: Papers Form the International Women’s Conference Oaxtepex, Mexico, December 1-6.1986. EATWOT Women’s Commission.
Lindsay, B. (Ed.). (1980). Comparative Perspectives of Third World Women: The impact of race sex and class. New York: Praeger Scientific.
Williams, C. (1983). The Rural Woman: Her problems and her possibilities in women's programs. United Nations Economic Council For Africa.
Powey, C. F. (Ed). The Community of Women and Men in the Church. The Sheffield Report. Philadelphia: Fortress Press, 1983.
Oduyoye, M.A. (1986). Hearing and Knowing: Theological Reflections on Christianity in Africa. New York: Orbis Books.
_________. (1995). Daughters of Anowa. New York: Orbis Books.
Oduyoye, M. A & Musimbi Kanyoro (Eds). (1992). The Will to Arise. New York: Orbis Books.
Welsh, S. D. (1985). Communities of Resistance and Solidarity: A Feminist Theology of Liberation. New York: Orbis.
Nasimiyu-Wasike, A. (1998). Jesus and an African Woman's Experience. In Mugambi, J.N.K. and L. Magesa. (Eds.) Jesus in African Christianity: Experimentation and Diversity in African Christology. (2nded.). Nairobi: Acton Publishers.
__________. (1990). An African Woman's Legitimate Role in Ministry. In Mugambi, J.N.K. & L. Magesa. (Eds.). The Church African Christianity: Innovative Essays in Ecclesiology. Nairobi: Initiatives Publishers.
__________. (1992). African Women's Prophetic Voices. In Mugambi J.N.K and A.Nasimiyu-Wasike. (Eds.). Moral and Ethical Issues in African Christianity: Exploratory Essays in Moral Theology. Nairobi: Initiatives Publishers.

Course: MARY AFST 586: Sociology of Development/Underdevelopment and African Religion
Course Overview:

This course interrelates various religions in East Africa and the socioeconomic development in colonial and postcolonial periods. It sees religion as a key factor in sustainable development and draws on concrete examples from Africa. Directed field research will bring the students into direct contact with development leaders and projects in Kenya.


Course Description:

Until recently, religion was seen from various perspectives as insignificant in the economic and political dimensions of life. Many Marxists dismissed it as a mere ideological tool of the ruling classes over the poor. Modernizers on the other hand saw the connection at most as an indirect one with religion contributing to the changing of people’s attitudes and personalities. This course aims at showing the direct connection between religion and the economic and political development of the peoples of East Africa. It will do this based upon a theoretical framework of articulated modes of production. Both the explicit and implicit connections between traditional, Christian and Islamic religions with economic and political development will be explored.

Students will also participate in field research aimed at understanding the various approaches to development at both micro and macro level. This will include interviews with ministerial level personnel, international aid agencies as well as people involved in grassroots socioeconomic projects.

SELECTED BOOKS
Achola, P.W., Mondoh, H., Shiundu, J. and Ng’ong’ah, B.G. (Eds). (2004). Governance, Society and Development in Kenya. Eldoret: Moi University Press.
Bourdillon, M. (1992). Religion and Society. Zimbabwe: Mambo Press.
Charles Elliot. (1987). Comfortable Compassion: Poverty, Power, and the Church. London: Hodder and Stoughton.
Cromwell, D. (2002). Private Planet: Corporate Plunder and the Fight Back.
Hancock, G. (1991). The Lords of poverty. London: Mandarin.
Leys, C. (1996). The Rise and fall of Development Theory. Indiana: Indiana University Press.
Mazrui, A. (1990). Cultural Forces in World Politics. London: Heinemann.
Mpagi, P. W. (2002). African Christian Theology in the Contemporary Context. Kisubi, Uganda: Marianum Press Limited.
Otto, M. (1982). Religion and Social Conflicts. New York: Orbis Books.
Ritzier, G. (1999). Enchanting a Disenchanted world: Revolutionizing the Means of Consumption. Pine force Press.
Rodney, W. (1989). How Europe Underdeveloped Africa. Nairobi: Heinemann.
Taylor, J. G. (1979). From Modernization to Modes of Production: a Critique of the Sociologies of Development and Underdevelopment. London: Macmillan Press.
Westerlund, David. (1980). Ujamaa na Dini: A Study of Some Aspects of Society and Religion in Tanzania, 1961 - 1977, Stockholm: Almquist and Wiksell International.

Webster, A. (1984). Introduction to the Sociology of Development. London: Macmillan Education.


Wim van Binsbergen and Schoffeleers, Matthew. (1985). Theoretical Explorations in African Religion, London: Kegan Paul Inc.
Wim van Binsbergan. (1985). Old Modes of Production and Capitalist Encroachment, London: Kegan Paul Inc.
Sen, Amartya Kumar. (2001). Development as Freedom. New York: Oxford University Press.

Course: MARY AFST 526: Contemporary Political & Economic Realities in Kenya
Course Overview:

The course seeks to understand the structure of East African political and economic systems from pre-colonial days to contemporary times, which underpin the present crises and upheavals.


Course Description:

The course will study political and economic foundations, past and present, of African society intensively; clan based political allegiances and communal economic systems; colonial-imposed changes; and post-independence attempts to create nation-states. It will focus on the conflicts and crises, which are disrupting effective government and economic development.


Method of Delivery

Through lectures, readings, discussions and direct field research.



BIBLIOGRAPHY
Abrahamsen, R. (2000). Disciplining Democracy: Development discourse and good governance in Africa. London: Zed Books.
Barkan, J.D. (Ed.). (1984). Political and Public Policy in Kenya and Tanzania. Nairobi: Heinemann Press.
Boahen, Adu A. (1987). African Perspective on Colonialism. Baltimore: The John Hopkins University Press.
Bratton, M. & Van de Walle, N. (1997). Democratic Experiments in Africa: Regime transitions in comparative perspective. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
Chazan, Michel A. & Eisenstast S.N.E.J. (Eds.). (1983). The Early State in Africa Perspective. New York: Brill: Leiden.
Evan-Pritchard & M, Fortes. (Eds.). (1940). African Political System, London: Oxford University Press.
Friis-Hasen, Esbern. (1987). CDR Research Report and IRA Research Paper. Copenhagen: Center for Development Research.
Hodgkin, Thomas. (1961).African Political Parties. Harmondsworth: Penguin Books Ltd.
Kurtz, D.V. (2001). Political Anthropology: Power and Paradigms. Boulder, Colombia: Westview Press.
Mshomba, R. E. (2000). Africa in the Global Economy. Boulder, Colombia: Lynne Rienner Publishers.
Rainer Siegler, D.B. (1990). Political Stability and Development: A Comparative Analysis of Kenya, Tanzania and Uganda. London: Lynnr Rienner Publishers.
Salih, M.(Ed.) (2003). African Political Parties: Evolution, institutionalism and governance. London: Pluto Press.
Samoff, Joel. (1974). Tanzania: Local Politics and the Structure of Power. Wisconsin: The University of Wisconsin Press.
Salim, Ahmeda. (Ed). (1984). State formation in Eastern Africa. Nairobi: Heinemann Press.
Tordoff, William. (1991). Government and Politics in Africa. London: Macmillan Education Ltd.
Pratt & U. M. Bismarck. (Eds.). (1981). Towards Socialism in Tanzania. Toronto: University of Toronto Press.
Young, C. (1994). The African Colonial State in Perspective. New Haven: Yale University Press.

Course: MARY AFST 572: Introduction to East African Art: its Secular and Religious Themes.
Course Overview: The course explores the various forms and types of East African art, the people that produce it, the ideas that promote it, and their functions within social, cultural and spiritual contexts. The aim is that the students understand East African art as it is understood by the people who produce it. The expectation is that, afterwards, the students should be able to teach the material to others.
Course Description: The course is designed to make students explore, understand and appreciate the complex dimensions of East African art. Relationships of various Art forms such as sculpture, painting, architecture, graphics, weaving and pottery. Their development in different cultures from ancient to modern times. Critical analysis of cross-cultural influences.
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