Message: #3 From: Press



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Group 1


Message: #3 From: Press

Dec 20, 2001 06:58

The first question is for all Groups:
Industrialization transformed the countries and cultures of Europe and America in many ways. Today, many countries around the world are to develop viable industrial economies. Mexico is a dramatic example. Not everyone in such countries welcomes the change.

In your opinion, what are the advantages and disadvantages of industrialization? Please be specific when you answer. And feel free to cite current as well as historical examples.

The Press respectfully awaits your response.


Message: #16 From: Mexico

Dec 20, 2001 16:45 response to message #3:


Some advantages of industrilization are more places for people to work and live. Since the towns will grow it will give people more oppurtunities for working and living. Some disadvantages are overcrowdedness, poor living conditions, and pollution. While being industrialized, more important situations are overlooked such as those problems.


Message: #19 From: Press

Dec 20, 2001 16:47 response to message #16:


Good. You bring up some excellent problems with industrialization, especially as seen today. What were some of the problems historically with industrialization, in particular in reference to children?




Message: #40 From: Press

Dec 20, 2001 17:02


The press respectfully awaits a response to the effects of industrialization historically, especially in relevance to children.

Message: #44 From: Mexico

Dec 20, 2001 17:06

In response to Press's message #19:

Some problems historically in reference to children there is currently 8-22 million child workers in Mexico. They work on jobs such as factories, sweatshops, farms and on the street. Their ages range from 15 and under. In the 1800`s children as young as 10 years old from 6 in the morning to 8 at night. The children were forced to work because of their families lack of income. Many of the children worked in factories and mines. Since they were so young they usually were not able to work the machinery correctly and were often mutulated or killed by the machinery because they weren`t able to operate the machines in the correct manner. THe children signed a contract that basically made them the property of the factory owner. If they disobeyed they were usually fined of their already small salary`s or beaten.




Message: #45 From: Press

Dec 20, 2001 17:08 response to message #44:


Thank you for a comprehensive response. What effect did unions have on the change in working conditions?

Message: #67 From: Mexico

Dec 20, 2001 17:21 response to message #45:

In 1833, the Parliament passed the Factory Act. The new law made it illegal to hire children under 9 years old. Children from the ages of 9 to 13 were not to work more than 8 hours a day. Children from the ages of 14 to 18 could not be required to work more than 12 hours. In 1842, the Mines Act placed similar limits on the work of children in mining.


Message: #66 : Press

Dec 20, 2001 17:21 1:


The Press respectfully awaits a response.

Message: #67 From: Mexico

Dec 20, 2001 17:21 response to message #45:

In 1833, the Parliament passed the Factory Act. The new law made it illegal to hire children under 9 years old. Children from the ages of 9

Children from the ages of 14 to 18 could not be required to work more than 12 hours. In1842, the Mines Act placed similar limits on the work of children in mining.



Message: #68 From: Press

Dec 20, 2001 17:22 response to message #67:

You are accurate in saying that Parliament passed laws to protect children, but I am still unclear as to what the role of unions was in the change in working conditions. How did unions change working conditions in general?


Message: #73 From: Mexico

Dec 20, 2001 17:30 response to message #68:


The unions figured out that they had strength in numbers. They used this strength to help raise wages and improve working conditions. Because of their numbers they could strike or refuse to work.

Message: #77 From: Press

Dec 20, 2001 17:33 response to message #73:

Thank you for clarifying. Let`s look at some other parts of industrialization. Although we often think of the world as mostly industrialized, there are still many nations that are not industrialized. Why is industrialization not universal across the globe?


Message: #85 From: Mexico

Dec 20, 2001 17:42 response to message #77:

Some coutries are not indutrialized because certain countries don`t have well stocked food supplies, small work forces, and they have a shortage of people with money to invest in the idea. Another reason is that they don`t have major inventions to industrialize around. These are some reasons why some countries don`t advance.


Message: #87 From: Press

Dec 20, 2001 17:45 response to message #85:

I see. You mentioned that these non-industrialized countries have not advanced. Given what you know about industrialization, do you believe it is better for a country to industrialize or not? Explain your response.


Message: #95 From Mexico From: Mexico

Dec 20, 2001 17:55 response to message #87:

Yes, we do believe that countries should industrilize. Industrial growth brings about technology, inventions and progress causing there to be more suitable living and working conditions. Some methods of industrialization are large labor forces, abundant resources, favorable locations for trade, developed banking systems,and political stability.


Message: #97 From: Press

Dec 20, 2001 17:57 response to message #95:

Thank you. Since you favor industrialization and you are aware of the effects of industrialization, what advice you would provide countries that are beginning to industrialize now?


Message: #102 From: Mexico

Dec 20, 2001 18:00 response to message #97:

Some advice we would give to new countries who are industrializing are don`t be afraid of change because it will end up being a good thing.


Message: #106 From: Press

Dec 20, 2001 18:01 response to message #102:


I was hoping for a more detailed response, but let`s move on. Where did industrialization begin and why did it begin there?




Message: #109 From: Press

Dec 20, 2001 18:03

The Press would like to thank the delegates for their sustained and careful attention and for the serious effort to respond to our questions.

we found your responses very informative. We hope that we’ßll meet with you again and discuss other topics. We enjoyed the exchange.


The Members of the Press



Group 2



Message: #3 From: Press

Dec 20, 2001 06:58

The first question is for all Groups:
Industrialization transformed the countries and cultures of Europe and America in many ways. Today, many countries around the world are just beginning to develop viable industrial economies. Mexico is a dramatic example. Not everyone in such countries welcomes the change.

In your opinion, what are the advantages and disadvantages of industrialization? Please be specific when you answer. And feel free to cite current as well as historical examples.


The Press respectfully awaits your response.

Message: #25 From: Mexico

Dec 20, 2001 16:53

We have agreed that the advantages of industrialzation are: more advanced technology, more people with jobs, more products produced, more money for the economy, it keeps citizens off the streets, and the population will increase substantially. The disadvantages are: the enviornment will slowly erode, because of the increase in factories and the use harmful chemicals that will affect the surrounding animal and plant life. Also the wealth will not be distributed as evenly, the poor will get poorer, and the rich will get richer. They will turn to children and women for cheaper labor, as the factories expand. These things happened in the industrial revolution of North America, and Great Britain.


Message: #31 From: Press

Dec 20, 2001 16:57 response to message #25:

Thank you for that wonderfully detailed and thoughtful answer. You are right about all of these affects. What political affects did industrialization have? Does industrialization change a country’s relationship with other countries? If so, how?

The Press



Message: #48 From: Mexico

Dec 20, 2001 17:11

Some of the political effects of the industrial revolution are as follows : If there was a leader in office while the industrial revolution progressed then it would make the leader look better in the eyes of the country and the people would rally under his support. Then surrounding countries would become drastically influenced from the ideas and the inventions of the industrialized country. They would see the progression and improvement in their economy and technology and try to adopt their systems. As this spreads, most of the surrounding countries would improve their own systems and soon everybody would be caught up in the industrial revolution. Through there are different a country can go about industrializing (i.e keeping their progression a secret, as Great Britain did by not allowing their engineers to leave the country) this wouldn`t stay a secret for long because of spys or tourists or an engineer escaping from the country. The government electoral candidates would use the issues of Child Labor and underpaid Women laborers as leverage for their campaign, preaching change and better ways to find labor, but they would not follow through on their promises because to change all that would mean to change the whole way their economy works.


Message: #53 From: Press

Dec 20, 2001 17:14 response to message #48:

Excellent response. You clearly have a good understanding of these complex events. Let me ask though, if industrialization is fated to spread, why are there still many countries in the world that have yet to really industrialize?


Message: #71 From: Mexico

Dec 20, 2001 17:26

Some countries are still far in debt, or they just don`t have the money so they cant industrialize. Some are still consumed by old religious beliefs and are not willing to change and givin to new systems and ideas, and some are so held back by their government that they don’t have the oppurtunity to agree or disagree with outside influences. For instens communist societies like Cuba, the government will not allow new technological advances. In other countries they are dealing with civil wars, and outside aggressors that they do not have the time o resources to industrialize.


Message: #74 From: Press

Dec 20, 2001 17:31 response to message #71:


Good; thank you. We’ve talked about the effects of industrialization and why some countries have had trouble industrializing, but why do some countries industrialize, especially in some of the early countries? What factors led to industrialization in Great Britain and the US, for instance?

Message: #88 From: Mexico

Dec 20, 2001 17:46

When the population increased they were faced with problems about the lack of jobs, the shortage of food and poor living conditions, so they needed to come up with ways to solve this problem. They started to build factories, especialy the older countries, because they were around the longest and they knew what worked and what didn`t. So they got the idea of industrialization that would be better for the economy and the people. Great Britan and North America had an abundant source of natural resources and a favorable geography. It started out with crop rotations and it improved livestock, then there was a rise in population political stability and a good banking system, then finaly inventuly new inventions revolutionized the world of indistry, and one inventoin led to another.


Message: #89 From: Press

Dec 20, 2001 17:50 response to message #88:

Thank you for that good and informative answer. You talked earlier about some of the negative affects of industrialization. What actions did governments (and societies) take to try and deal with these affects? How successful were these efforts?

Message: #109 From: Press

Dec 20, 2001 18:03

The Press would like to thank the delegates for their sustained and careful attention and for the serious effort to respond to our questions. we found your responses very informative. We hope that weÕll meet with you again and discuss other topics. We enjoyed the exchange.

The Members of the Press


Message: #104 From: Mexico

Dec 20, 2001 18:00

This will probably be our last response, the gov. put out the factory acts of 1833 and 1844, in order to decrease the the amount of child labor. the 1833 act stated that no cild under the age of 9 could work, and the 1844 act stated that no child under the age of 8 could work. But buisness`s did not listen to them, so they with help from Great Britain, they founded the International Labor Orginization (ILO), which worked to protect the rights of women and children around the world. We think it was founded in 1919, or 1903. They made striking legal again, so the underpaid and over worked people can demand better rights. Thank you for your questions, we were very pleased with your interest in us.

Group 3


Message: #3 From: Press

Dec 20, 2001 06:58

The first question is for all Groups:

Industrialization transformed the countries and cultures of Europe and America in many ways. Today, many countries around the world are just beginning to develop viable industrial economies. Mexico is a dramatic example. Not everyone in such countries welcomes the change.

In your opinion, what are the advantages and disadvantages of industrialization? Please be specific when you answer. And feel free to cite current as well as historical examples.

The Press respectfully awaits your response.



Message: #34 From: Mexico

Dec 20, 2001 16:59 response to message #3:


Some advantages of industrialization are more products produced faster, more money made because of selling products, and workers are having better lives because of the technology and machines. Some of the disadvantages are pollution, because it effects us and also the animals and environment. Also there could be less jobs because of the machinery. For example in Great Britian the community started off very small with few businesses but over time it became very industrialized.

Message: #39 From: Press

Dec 20, 2001 17:02

Thank you for your specific response, especially the example you gave of Britain. I`m interested in your comment that workers have better lives because of industrialization. Is this always the case?


Message: #47 From: Mexico

Dec 20, 2001 17:10

Industrialization isn`t always better for the workers because sometimes the machines take over their jobs, therefore leaving people jobless. The machines can sometimes lead to fatal accidents, as well.


Message: #52 From: Press

Dec 20, 2001 17:13


Thank you, it is true that industrialization can be very hard for workers. How are children affected?

The Press



Message: #63 From: Mexico

Dec 20, 2001 17:19

Children are affected by industrialization because factories need workers and the children need money to help support their families. They have to work long hours under harsh working conditions. The factories get most of their child labor from orphanages and poor families. The children that work are unable to get an education, so it is hard to break the cycle for thier children. Also, the children get paid 1/7 of every dollar a man makes. The female children have more work, especcially around the home, than boys.


Message: #65 From: Press

Dec 20, 2001 17:20


Thank you for your comprehensive response. What methods have been used to push for change in the working conditions of factories?

The Press



Message: #72 From: Mexico

Dec 20, 2001 17:30

Some of the changes being made in the factories are some of the ages of children are not so low, and the unsanitary working condition as

there used to be in the past.

On the other hand some of the things that need to be changed are women and children are still paid less and should be paid more equally. Also chilrdren either lack or have no educational background. International labor organizatoin forms international standered for better working and living conditions.


Message: #75 From: Press

Dec 20, 2001 17:32


Thank you for your thoughtful comments. It appears life can be very hard for workers in the cities. Why and how did cities evolve in the first place?

The Press



Message: #81 From: Mexico

Dec 20, 2001 17:41


The cities started off as really small villages and as other villages turned into cities the others got in the race for money and power. Population and demand for workers lead to people leaving their homes and farms to find buisness in the city.




Message: #91From: Mexico

Dec 20, 2001 17:53


We have been pushing NEW CONFERENCE MESSAGES and can`t get any response except for group 2. What did we do wrong?????????

Message: #94 From: Press

Dec 20, 2001 17:54


Perhaps there were no messages for awhile. Please respond to the question regarding the evolution of cities. How did they come about?

The Press



Message: #99 From: Mexico

Dec 20, 2001 17:58


The cities started off as really small villages and as other villages turned into cities the others got in the race for money and power. Population growth and demand for workers lead to peole leaving their homes and farms in search of work.

Message: #105 From: Press

Dec 20, 2001 18:00


Thank you for your general response. More specifically, can you explain the three phases of development that led to the creation of modern day cities?

The Press






Message: #109 From: Press

Dec 20, 2001 18:03

The Press would like to thank the delegates for their sustained and careful attention and for the serious effort to respond to our questions. we found your responses very informative. We hope that weÕll meet with you again and discuss other topics. We enjoyed the exchange.
The Members of the Press





Group 4


Message: #3 From: Press

Dec 20, 2001 06:58

The first question is for all Groups:

Industrialization transformed the countries and cultures of Europe and America in many ways. Today, many countries around the world are just beginning to develop viable industrial economies. Mexico is a dramatic example. Not everyone in such countries welcomes the change.


In your opinion, what are the advantages and disadvantages of industrialization? Please be specific when you answer. And feel free to cite current as well as historical examples.
The Press respectfully awaits your response.

Message: #30 From: Mexico

Dec 20, 2001 16:55 response to message #3:

The advantages of industrialization would be that there are more job oppertunities,it would help the economy, increase trade in general,and

increase technology . The disadvantages are over population, polution, and the amount of homeless people increase in number.



Message: #36 From: Press

Dec 20, 2001 16:59 response to message #30:


Thank you, those are good points. Did industrialization have any political affects? Does it change a country’s relations with other countries?

If so, how?

The Press



Message: #54 From: Mexico

Dec 20, 2001 17:15 response to message #36:

sorry we forgot
Yes industrialization had political effects. An example is the lawsuits against the globalization of Nike having underaged and underpaid children working in factories. Mexico is breaking rules of NAFTA because of these underaged workers and bad working conditions and bad working conditions.


Message: #61 From: Press

Dec 20, 2001 17:18 response to message #54:


Those are good examples. But more broadly, how are relations between nations affected when they have reached different levels of industrialization?

The Press



Message: #78 From: Mexico

Dec 20, 2001 17:38 response to message #61:


Industrialization is the same as globalization. Globalization is the expanding of businesses over countries. For example, McDonald`s. Initialy, it began in the United states, then it grew to what it is now. Currently there are McDonald`s every country.

Message: #83 From: Press

Dec 20, 2001 17:41 response to message #78:

That doesn’t quite answer the question, but let’s look at the response anyway. I agree that globalization is the expanding of business among

many countries (globalization is also a cultural communication phenomenon), but is that the same as industrialization? Could you please

explain the difference between the two terms?


Message: #90 From: Mexico

Dec 20, 2001 17:52 response to #84:

For most part globalization is the larger more advanced, version of industrialism. Globalization covers more land more buisnesses and more

people. Globalization is similar to Pacman if you will.Pacman will be the business consuming other businesses. Whereas industrialism is the

growth of the business.


Message: #92 From: Press

Dec 20, 2001 17:53 response to message #90:

You talked earlier about some of the negative affects of industrialization. What actions did governments (and societies) take to try and deal with these affects? How successful were these efforts?

The Press



Message: #103 From: Mexico

Dec 20, 2001 18:00 response to message #93:


America went into mexico with nafta to tell them to inforce their labor laws.

Message: #108 From: Press

Dec 20, 2001 18:02 response to message #103:


What actions did governments take within their own countries to lessen the negative effects of industrialization?




Message: #109 From: Press

Dec 20, 2001 18:03

The Press would like to thank the delegates for their sustained and careful attention and for the serious effort to respond to our questions. we found your responses very informative. We hope that weÕll meet with you again and discuss other topics. We enjoyed the exchange.
The Members of the Press




Group 5


Message: #3 From: Press

Dec 20, 2001 06:58

The first question is for all Groups:

Industrialization transformed the countries and cultures of Europe and America in many ways. Today, many countries around the world are just beginning to develop viable industrial economies. Mexico is a dramatic example. Not everyone in such countries welcomes the change.

In your opinion, what are the advantages and disadvantages of industrialization? Please be specific when you answer. And feel free to cite current as well as historical examples.

The Press respectfully awaits your response.



Message: #27 From: Mexico

Dec 20, 2001 16:54 response to message #3:


Some disadvantages of Industrialization are, when cities become industrialized, population begins to grow which leads to overcrowding and that causes water/air pollution, crime, poor housing, and unsanitary living conditions. Some advantages of Industrialization are that, since theres faster production, economic growth, and openings for jobs, it provides a variety of work for many different people. And when theres more people, that means more production. Therefore the community has more money to provide help for those in need.

Message: #32 From: Press

Dec 20, 2001 16:57


Thank you for your extremely thoughtful answer. One other factor to consider when discussing industrialization is the working conditions

for laborers. What were conditions like during the Industrial Revolution in England?

The Press


Message: #38 From: Mexico

Dec 20, 2001 17:01 response to message #19:


When factories become more successful in other countries where humane laws are not strongly enforced, then the factories hire children at very low pay and take advantage of them. They are forced to work because their family has no other way to make money and the children are forced to work in horrible working conditions to live. They drop out of school and lose their chance to have a succesful job by their lack of education.

Message: #42 From: Press

Dec 20, 2001 17:03


Thank you for your response. The conditions for children certainly can be terrible. Are men and women also affected by factory work? If so, how?

The Press



Message: #46 From: Mexico

Dec 20, 2001 17:09

England protested low wages, long hours, unsafe conditions and the constant threat of unemployment even though strikes and unions were illegal. Self-employed workers were being replaced by factories and machines by many industries. Since they knew that one person standing for his/her opinion they would create a large group of men to form "labor unions."


Message: #50 From: Press

Dec 20, 2001 17:12

Thank you for your response. Remember too that during the Industrial Revolution women were often forced to take on the double responsibility of working in a factory and at home. Your comments about unions are very interesting. Who was the group in England that was particularly famous and why?


Message: #55 From: Mexico

Dec 20, 2001 17:15

Factory work made special problems for women. Their jobs took them out of their home life for 12 hours or more a day. For women it was harder to make a living because they made less then what men made. Also, women`s choices for work were limited to textile factories, piece work shops and domestic service.


Message: #59 From: Press

Dec 20, 2001 17:17


Thank you for your excellent response regarding the conditions for women during the Industrial Revolution. What were the methods of

change for working conditions in factories? Please refer to a specific group in England.

The Press



Message: #69 From: Mexico

Dec 20, 2001 17:23


The International Labor Organization was founded in 1919. The purpose of it was to make working and living conditions better. They worked on underemployment, working conditions, technological change, economic development, and international economic competition.

Message: #70 From: Press

Dec 20, 2001 17:26


Thank you for your impressive answer. The International Labor Organization is a very interesting group. Remember that one of the first groups working for change during the Industrial Revolution was the Luddites. It sounds as though there are many drawbacks for people to live and work in cities. Why and how did cities evolve in the first place?

The Press



Message: #80 From: Mexico

Dec 20, 2001 17:39


There were three phases to the process of developing cities. The first phase began with settlements that grew larger. The settlements depended on domesticated animals and agriculture. The settlements also attracted many different people ranging from merchants to government officials. The second phase came with the industrial revolution in Europe. People were constantly looking for employment and a way to a better life. Since the industrial revolution, cities have grown tremendously in size. The third phase began after WWII. As the world economy grew largely in size and became more international cities from all over the world began to grow larger, very quickly.

Message: #82

From: Press

Dec 20, 2001 17:41

To: Mexico

GRP 5

Thank you for your excellent response. Why did countries around the world develop differently? Please explain the relationship between



imperialism and industrialization in your response.

The Press





Message: #93 From: Mexico

Dec 20, 2001 17:54


Imperialism is the policy practice or advocacy of extending the power and dominion of a nation. The goal of imperialism is the search for profit and industrialization made it possible for Europeans to produce large surpluses of manufactured goods. Certain countries were often politicaly unstable, so they would not develope at the same rate as other countries. Some countries did not have the same resources as others, which also contributed to them developing at different rates.

Message: #96 From: Press

Dec 20, 2001 17:56

Thank you for your detailed response. Could you please explain the economic relationship between industrial powers and their colonies? Use a specific example if possible.


Message: #98

From: Mexico

Dec 20, 2001 17:58

GRP 5


please be more specific

Message: #101 From: Press

Dec 20, 2001 17:59

I apologize if you did not understand the question. Allow me to rephrase. Who benefitted the most from imperialism and why?

The Press






Message: #109 From: Press

Dec 20, 2001 18:03

The Press would like to thank the delegates for their sustained and careful attention and for the serious effort to respond to our questions. we found your responses very informative. We hope that weÕll meet with you again and discuss other topics. We enjoyed the exchange.
The Members of the Press





Group 6


Message: #3 From: Press

Dec 20, 2001 06:58

The first question is for all Groups:
Industrialization transformed the countries and cultures of Europe and America in many ways. Today, many countries around the world are just beginning to develop viable industrial economies. Mexico is a dramatic example. Not everyone in such countries welcomes the change.

In your opinion, what are the advantages and disadvantages of industrialization? Please be specific when you answer. And feel free to cite current as well as historical examples.


The Press respectfully awaits your response.




Message: #33 From: Press

Dec 20, 2001 16:59

GR #6:

The Press respectfully waits for your first response.

The Press


Message: #41 From: Mexico

Dec 20, 2001 17:02

GRP6

*sorry, we forgot our group number, here is the message again.



The advantages of Industrialization are that more products are produced, there is more money circulating in the economy, it helps develop technology (for exampe, the invention and employment of the Cotton Gin and Steam Engine), and it rockets a country`s economy because as more products are produced, there is more trade with other countries. The disadvantages of Industrialization are that as more successful entrepeneurs and business­men become successful, the hardworking laborers in the factories become more underpaid, and poverty in the community rises. Also with more and more factories being built, pollution at extreme levels is unavoidable, and the environment is greatly damaged.

Message: #43From: Press

Dec 20, 2001 17:05 response to message #41:


Thank you. Your answer sets forth the generally accepted trends of the effects of industrialization. Do you have any specific information on how employment rates before and after countries have industrialized -- that is -- swtiched from agrarian to industrial economies? What eveidence is there that industrialization increases employment?

Message: #58 From: Mexico

Dec 20, 2001 17:17

- Employment rates were low before Industrialization, because most people lived at home and worked their farms. When industrialization began, it created more jobs because large factories needed laborers, and people moved into the city to work in the factories.


Message: #64 From: Press

Dec 20, 2001 17:19 response to message #58:


Thank you. Isn;t your refernce to people working on farms an indication that people were in fact employed? ANd that industrialization just creatd new kinds of jobs -- but not necessarily more? What evidence do you have that idustrialization / globalization improves standards of living for developing countries? Any indicators, for example, such as life expectancy or infant mortality rates?




Message: #76 From: Press

Dec 20, 2001 17:32

Gr# 6:
The Press respectfully awaits your response.
The Press


Message: #79 From: Mexico

Dec 20, 2001 17:39


The standards of living increase for some, but for the majority they become worse. Of course the succesful, wealthy business men have excellent lives, the workers not only have horrible working conditions (in "The Jungle" by Upton Sinclair, the horrible sanitation and working conditions in the meat packing industry were illustrated brutally) But many workers were forced to live in crime ridden neighborhoods in small crowded tenaments. Infant mortality rates receeded from the Agrian times, but the life expectancy loered tremendously, to about eighteen to nineteen years old.

Message: #84 From: Press

Dec 20, 2001 17:42 message #79:


Thank you. That was avery informative and highly intersting answer with your pointers to Sinclair. Your reference to distribution of wealth is intriguiing.
Industrialization requires great investments of capital. Where does such capital come from and what affect does the concentration of capital in industry have on the culture of a developing country? Perhaps you could discuss Mexico as an example?













Message: #86 From: Press

Dec 20, 2001 17:43

Could you also verify and repeat you statistic about change in life expectancy???
The Press
Message: #107From: Press

Dec 20, 2001 18:01 response to message #100:


Again, I want to compliment you for a very informative, thoughtful and detailed answer. Given your understanding of the issues, what is your advice to developing nations about industrialization?
The press
From: Press

Dec 20, 2001 18:03

The Press would like to thank the delegates for their sustained and careful attention and for the serious effort to respond to our questions. we found your responses very informative. We hope that we can all meet with you again and discuss other topics. We enjoyed the exchange.
The Members of the Press


Message: #100 From: Mexico

Dec 20, 2001 17:59 response to message #86:


Industrialization requires a great deal of capital (money), but as the change from Agrian to Industial culture occurs, that money is generated by the growth of the area`s economy. The money for businesses came from the country`s banks, and it was usually only successful if the country had a decent or good banking system. As business grew, and more and more workers were needed, the money began to circulate and grow. Because workers were not protected by child labor laws, minimum wage standards etc, the owners of these businesses could pay them as little money in wages as they desired, keeping more money for themselves, and more money for investing, which circulated it back into the banks. In mexico, workers to this day are still exploited, being paid extremely low wages. Children are not only hired before they are of legal working age (14), but they are hired by the millions and they are paid so little wages that they have no choice but to work for excessively long hours with no hope of having time or money for school and education.

*our satistics were slightly incorrect, the expectancy was 17 years (for a worker in the city of Manchester, England), and it was taken from resource card 1 of the Urbanization unit....living to 18 or 19 would be doing very well. This was roughly the expectancy in other large cities that were affected by Inudstrialization, such as New York City, London, etc.




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