Medieval World Extension Assignment Story Option



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Medieval World Extension Assignment -

Story Option

You will write a story that helps the reader to understand life in the Middle Ages (Medieval Times). The story must be two pages if handwritten or one typed page if you use 12 point font and single space. Your story must fulfill the following requirements:



  1. Use at least 6 characters from those created by your class.

  2. Each character must have a specific role in the story. It is not sufficient for one of the characters to appear in the story briefly to say “hello”. They must contribute to the plot and we must understand their place in the medieval world. For instance, if you use a character that is a knight, he must be have a healthy disrespect for peasants and a strong urge to tear away at his enemy’s castle walls.

  3. There must be some sort of conflict.

  4. The conflict must reach a climax (the high-intensity turning point of the story).

  5. The conflict must be resolved in some way.

  6. There must be a moral to the story stated in very clear terms (“Brother Cadvel turned to Gerhardt and said, ‘sometimes, despite all our efforts, we must accept that some things are out of our hands.’”)

  7. There mustn’t be any anachronisms (Saint Francis cannot be drinking a Coke, a knight may not wield a samurai sword or fire a gun).

  8. All of the elements above must be underlined in the colors listed below:

  • Characters – Yellow

  • Conflict – Orange

  • Climax – Red

  • Resolution – Green

  • Moral – Blue

  • Understanding life – Purple

Medieval World Extension Assignment -

Story Option

You will write a story that helps the reader to understand life in the Middle Ages (Medieval Times). The story must be two pages if handwritten or one typed page if you use 12 point font and single space. Your story must fulfill the following requirements:



  1. Use at least 6 characters from those created by your class.

  2. Each character must have a specific role in the story. It is not sufficient for one of the characters to appear in the story briefly to say “hello”. They must contribute to the plot and we must understand their place in the medieval world. For instance, if you use a character that is a knight, he must be have a healthy disrespect for peasants and a strong urge to tear away at his enemy’s castle walls.

  3. There must be some sort of conflict.

  4. The conflict must reach a climax (the high-intensity turning point of the story).

  5. The conflict must be resolved in some way.

  6. There must be a moral to the story stated in very clear terms (“Brother Cadvel turned to Gerhardt and said, ‘sometimes, despite all our efforts, we must accept that some things are out of our hands.’”)

  7. There mustn’t be any anachronisms (Saint Francis cannot be drinking a Coke, a knight may not wield a samurai sword or fire a gun).

  8. All of the elements above must be underlined in the colors listed below:

  • Characters – Yellow

  • Conflict – Orange

  • Climax – Red

  • Resolution – Green

  • Moral – Blue

  • Understanding life – Purple


Social Studies “I Am” Poem

Medieval World Version
Instructions

  1. Select at least six of the characters created by your class. You will write “I Am” poems as if you were each of these characters.

  2. Come up with appropriate conclusions to following fragments based on your social class. Write your ideas next to the fragments as a sort of rough draft.

  3. Rewrite the poems without the words in parentheses on blank paper (or on the back of this one). Use your best penmanship or type it up. If you write first in pencil, go over your writing in pen.

  4. Enhance the poem’s appearance with some sort of colored decoration.

  5. You will be scored on how well you:

    1. Showed your understanding of the social class you picked.

    2. Finished each line with an appropriate response.

    3. Created a neat and appealing product.

I
Sample I Am Poem without historical considerations.

I am mighty and loyal

I wonder where adventure will take me next

I hear the panting of my eager warhorse

I see gleam of the sun off the blades of the enemy

I want to take my enemy’s castle

I am mighty and loyal
I pretend to be unafraid of death

I feel the regrets of comrades lost

I touch the ashen shaft of my lance

I worry about range of their crossbows

I cry when my own son is knighted

I am mighty and loyal


I understand my obligations to my lord

I say “I will follow you into the fray”

I dream of glory for myself and my lord

I try to bring honor to my name

I hope my lord recognizes my devotion

I am mighty and loyal



I am a knight
Source: http://ettcweb.lr.k12.nj.us/forms/iampoem.htm
am
…(two special characteristics)
I wonder …(something you are actually curious about)
I hear…(an imaginary sound)
I see…(an imaginary sight)
I want…(an actual desire)
I am…(the first line of the poem restated)

I pretend…(something you pretend to do)
I feel…(a feeling about something imaginary)
I touch…(an imaginary touch)
I worry…(something that really bothers you)
I cry…(something that makes you very sad)
I am…(the first line of the poem repeated)

I understand…(something you know is true)
I say…(something you believe in)
I dream…(something you actually dream about)
I try…(something you make an effort to do)
I hope…(something you actually hope for)
I am…(the first line of the poem repeated)


social media assignment, verB

Name:

Imagine if people in history could have maintained social media accounts, like Facebook or Twitter. What kinds of things might they have said about themselves or the events through which they lived? Your assignment is to give a person from history that virtual voice by creating a poster that looks like their social networking page. The following are some things you ought to include on your page. Be sure that any content you include is based on historical events and people. Only the format of the website should be modern. Use as much historical data as you can get but it is okay to invent some things that paint a realistic picture of the era we are studying.




  • Create a personal profile for your historical figure. Include as much personal information as you can (age, date, birth place, occupation, education, etc).

  • What is your current status?

  • Who might be in your list of friends? Who would have posted on your wall? What would they have posted?

  • Whose Tweeter feed would your figure follow?

  • What groups might your figure be a part of?

  • What kind of pictures and videos might your figure like to post?

  • What kind of online games might your figure enjoy playing?

  • What would be a useful app for your figure’s mobile phone?

  • Add any other features that occur to you and that show your understanding of the period.


Steps in the process:

  1. Select one of the following categories of medieval personalities based on the characters created by your c lass:

    • A Noble – This could be a male or female. This might be low-level castle commanders (called castellans) of either gender or higher-level feudal lords called barons (kings, dukes, counts, and earls).

    • Warrior – you can be a knight or sergeant (mounted commoner), a mercenary crossbowman, or a peasant bowman or infantryman (fight on foot). You could even be a Knight Templar (monk warriors) or a Crusader.

    • A priest – This would be a well-educated male who was most likely in charge of lucrative church lands or a secretary to a nobleman. They often sought to improve their fortunes by being appointed bishop or abbot of a monastery. The highest level of the priesthood was cardinal or pope. These men held influence that rivaled that of kings.

    • A monk/friar or nun – Male or female; if you wanted to serve God in a less political way and with less temptation of greed, you could enter a “religious life”. Friars were more likely to be seen out in public than a monk.

    • Townsperson – You are part of what would become a middle-class. You likely are a free craftsperson or merchant and may consider yourself a privileged citizen of your city. You are likely a part of a guild that protects you politically and that is involved in city governance.

    • An “infidel” – You might be a denounced heretic who believes that the church has gone astray in its doctrine or practices. You might be of another religion (Eastern Orthodox, Muslim, or Jewish) who, depending on where you live, might be the target of mistreatment.

    • A commoner – You could be a humble farmer or laborer who is either a serf or freeman (yeoman). You might describe how life might be for the poor, including the importance of harvesting, violence, religion and illness.

  2. You must make reference to at least five other characters on your page with enough information about each to show your understanding of their place in medieval society. For instance, your main character may be a knight but his lord (a nobleman) might post on your knight’s wall an order to rendezvous at a certain place to wage war. The text of that post should demonstrate the relationship between a vassal and lord.

  3. Write up a rough draft of the features you plan to include, laying them out on scratch paper. Write the actual text you will include on the scratch paper.

  4. Complete the poster. Show your rough draft to me. Once I approve it, I will issue you a piece of poster paper.

  5. Grading guidelines: You will be scored on how well you incorporate accurate historical information in your internet elements, how detailed you are with the information, and how neatly you present the information (legible, organized information, some color to enhance the presentation, etc).


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