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Revision Guide for Early Modern AS students




Material

Page number

Introduction

1

Exam Advice

2

Mark Scheme

3

Advice on Question Stems

4

Course Requirements: Prescribed Content

5

Past Questions

6

Part 1 - Luther and the German Reformation, 1517-55 - Revision Notes

8

Part 2 - The Catholic Reformation, c1540-1600 - Revision Notes

38

Unit 1 is worth 50% - each half (B1 and B2) is therefore worth 25%. Unit 2 is worth 50%.


INTRODUCTION

This has been put together to assist you in your revision. You should use the notes you have made and the text books that you have been issued in conjunction with this document as the content in this is in no way exhaustive. It is vital that you understand and know the content for both units but more so for both halves of Unit 1. You should make summary notes to help you do this - and then begin to write detailed plans to past essay questions utilising that material.

The most common mistakes by good AS students are


  • the failure to answer the question;

  • the failure to link material to the question being asked, and;

  • the failure to follow the demands of the question.

For this reason we have included material on how to answer the questions. Plans are a crucial way of embedding these ideas. Unit 2 is source based and we will revise the necessary skills in class time.

*You should focus on knowing the material for both units over the holidays*

Exam Advice

You need to be aware of the mark scheme for this paper. Several things you need to note for you to do well:



  • You must write an analytical piece - the first sentence in each of the level descriptors on the next page. That means you must keep your answer focused; do not drift off and hope to salvage focus in a conclusion. First and last sentences to paragraphs that link your answer to the question are crucial, as is the use of the key words from the question

  • You need to understand what you are writing about; you cannot get away with learning model answers or plans. This means hard work in revision; reviewing and consolidating your understanding of each bullet on the syllabus and considering all possible questions

  • You need to know the material to do well. You need to use accurate facts and figures to back up your point. For this reason, next term, we will do factual tests. You need to prepare now and build up a bank of useful factual knowledge.

  • Your work needs to be organised and well planned. You must plan your answer before you start writing and know what you are trying to say. This will ensure that what you write will be clear.

  • Always explain why something is important to the question - i.e. if you have suggested something was a key consequence, or a key cause, explain how.

  • Include enough relevant detail to suggest to the examiner that you know more

  • Read the dates in a question. You need to answer with material relevant to those dates and not go beyond them. However there will be occasions when you a causation factor might come from before those dates. E.g. the reasons for Luther's 95 theses in 1517 will include material from pre-1517. However an essay on the response of the Catholic Church between 1545 and 1563 does not require material from before 1545. You will need to contextualise (i.e. use your judgement based on the context of the question).

  • Don't make your answer a list of material. Do try and build flowing paragraphs in which you explain your points AND link them to the question.

Mark Scheme (marks /30)

3

13-18

Candidates' answers will be attempt analysis and will show some understanding of the focus of the question. They will, however, include material which is either descriptive, and thus only implicitly relevant to the question's focus, or which strays from that focus. Factual material will be accurate but it may lack depth and/or relevance in places.
The writing will be coherent in places but there are likely to be passages which lack clarity and/or proper organisation. Only some of the skills needed to produce convincing extended writing are likely to be present. Syntactical and/or spelling errors are likely to be present.
Low Level 3: 13-14 marks The qualities of Level 3 are displayed, but material is less convincing in its range/depth and the quality of written communication does not conform.

Mid Level 3: 15-16 marks The qualities of Level 3 are displayed, but material is less convincing in its range/depth or the quality of written communication does not conform.

High Level 3: 17-18 marks The qualities of Level 3 are securely displayed.


4

19-24

Candidates offer an analytical response which relates well to the focus of the question and which shows some understanding of the key issues contained in it. The analysis will be supported by accurate factual material which will be mostly relevant to the question asked. The selection of material may lack balance in places.
The answer will show some degree of direction and control but these attributes may not be sustained throughout the answer. The candidate will demonstrate the skills needed to produce convincing extended writing but there may be passages which lack clarity or coherence. The answer is likely to include some syntactical and/or spelling errors.
Low Level 4: 19-20 marks The qualities of Level 4 are displayed, but material is less convincing in its range/depth and the quality of written communication does not conform.

Mid Level 4: 21-22 marks The qualities of Level 4 are displayed, but material is less convincing in its range/depth or the quality of written communication does not conform.

High Level 4: 23-24 marks The qualities of Level 4 are securely displayed.


5

25-30

Candidates offer an analytical response which directly addresses the focus of the question and which demonstrates explicit understanding of the key issues contained in it. It will be broadly balanced in its treatment of these key issues. The analysis will be supported by accurate, relevant and appropriately selected factual material which demonstrates some range and depth.
The exposition will be controlled and the deployment logical. Some syntactical and/or spelling errors may be found but the writing will be coherent overall. The skills required to produce convincing extended writing will be in place.
Low Level 5: 25-26 marks The qualities of Level 5 are displayed, but material is less convincing in its range/depth and the quality of written communication does not conform.

Mid Level 5: 27-28 marks The qualities of Level 5 are displayed, but material is less convincing in its range/depth or the quality of written communication does not conform.

High Level 5: 29-30 marks The qualities of Level 5 are securely displayed.


Question 'stems'.
Analysing the question is crucial to ensure your focus is accurate and appropriate. Look very closely at what exactly the question is asking you.

  • Pick out key words

  • Look for any restriction on dates

Particularly important are the question stems used; for example ‘How far?’, ‘How seriously?’ or ‘How significant?’ – all of which require a qualitative judgement to be made. Consider how significant, or how much something changed. If you can, compare it with other factors or consequences.


Candidates operating at the higher levels will begin to evaluate the explanations and judgements that they present, probably by considering different or conflicting alternatives before coming to a final conclusion.


Course Requirements: Prescribed Content

B1 - Luther, Lutheranism and the German Reformation 1517 – 55

Prescribed content bullets on syllabus:
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