Maryland Standards



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HCPSS Curriculum Framework

United States 1877- Present Day




Maryland Standards:

  1. Students will understand the historical development and current status of the fundamental concepts and processes of authority, power, and influence, with particular emphasis on democratic skills and attitudes necessary to become responsible citizens.

  2. Students will understand the diversity and commonality, human interdependence, and global cooperation of the people of Maryland, the United States, and the World through a multicultural and a historic perspective.

  3. Students will use geographic concepts and processes to examine the role of culture, technology, and the environment in the location and distribution of human activities and spatial connections throughout time.

  4. Students will develop economic reasoning to understand the historical development and current status of economic principles, institutions, and processes needed to be effective citizens, consumers, and workers participating in local communities, the nation, and the world.

  5. Students will examine significant ideas, beliefs, and themes; organize patterns and events; and analyze how individuals and societies have changed over time in Maryland and the United States.

  6. Students shall use reading, writing, and thinking processes and skills to gain knowledge and understanding of political, historical, and current events using chronological and spatial thinking, economic reasoning, and historical interpretation, by framing and evaluating questions from primary and secondary sources.


Literacy Framework:

Close Reading

Student Questions

Outcomes (linked to Common Core Standards)

Prompts

Sourcing

Consider the document’s source and purpose


Prior to reading the document, students should carefully analyze the source.




  • Who wrote this?




  • What is the author’s point of view?




  • Why was it written?




  • When was it written (a long time or a short time after the event)?




  • Is this a primary or secondary source? How do you know?




  • Is the source believable? Why or why not?

Key Ideas and Details

  • Cite specific textual evidence to support analysis of primary and secondary sources, attending to such features as the date and origin of the information. (RH.9-10.1)


Craft and Structure

  • Compare the point of view of two or more authors for how they treat the same or similar topics, including which details they include and emphasize in their respective accounts. (RH.9-10.6)


Integration of Knowledge and Ideas

  • Compare and contrast treatments of the same topic in several primary and secondary sources. (RH.9-10.9)




  • “I think the author probably believes...”




  • “The author’s purpose is to…”




  • “I think the audience is...”




  • “Based on the sourcing information, I predict this author will...”




  • “I do/don’t trust this source because...”




  • “If a contemporary of the author had written the text, his or her point of view would…”



Contextualizing

(Imagining/Visualizing the setting)

Place the document in a time period, culture, setting, or subject-specific context






  • “What events were happening at the time the text was written?”




  • In what ways might this influence what you are reading?




  • What was it like to be alive at this time?




  • What things were different during the time when the text was written? What things were the same?




  • What would it be like to see this event through the eyes of someone who lived in this time?




  • How might these perspectives and attitudes influence their actions?

Key Ideas and Details

  • Determine the central ideas or information of a primary or secondary source; provide an accurate summary of how key events or ideas develop over the course of the text. (RH.9-10.2)


Craft and Structure

  • Compare the point of view of two or more authors for how they treat the same or similar topics, including which details they include and emphasize in their respective accounts (RH.9-10.6)


Integration of Knowledge and Ideas

  • Assess the extent to which the reasoning and evidence in a text support the author’s claims. (RH.9-10.8)

  • Compare and contrast treatments of the same topic in several primary and secondary sources. (RH.9-10.9)




  • “I already know that _____ is happening at this time...”




  • “From this document I would guess that people at this time were feeling...”




  • “This document might not give me the whole picture because...”




  • “The events of the time were influenced by…”




  • “Life during this time period and life during the 21st century are similar and/or different because…”

Critical Reading

Read the text carefully to identify details and nuances in the author’s words, or in data, images, text features, etc.






  • What claims does the author make?




  • What evidence does the author use to support those claims?




  • How is this document supposed to make me feel?




  • What words does the author use to paint a particular picture of the event, or to convince me that they are right?




  • What information does the author leave out?

Key Ideas and Details

  • Cite specific textual evidence to support analysis of primary and secondary sources, attending to such features as the date and origin of the information. (RH.9-101)

  • Analyze in detail a series of events described in a text; determine whether earlier events caused later ones or simply preceded them. (RH.9-10.3)


Craft and Structure

  • Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including vocabulary describing political, social, or economic aspects of history/social science. (RH.9-10.4)

  • Analyze how a text uses structure to emphasize key points or advance an explanation or analysis (RH.9-10.5)

  • Compare the point of view of two or more authors for how they treat the same or similar topics, including which details they include and emphasize in their respective accounts. (RH.9-10.6)


Integration of Knowledge and Ideas

  • Assess the extent to which the reasoning and evidence in a text support the author’s claims. (RH.9-10.8)







  • “The author claims that…”




  • “To support his/her claims, the author…”




  • “I think the author chose these words because they make me feel…”




  • “The author is trying to convince me...(by using/saying...)”




  • “The ordering of events allows readers to...”




  • “Specific vocabulary the author uses provides…”

Corroborating

(Cross-Checking)

Compare multiple sources against each other to develop a well supported interpretations






  • What do other pieces of evidence (texts, images, data, maps, etc.) say?




  • Am I finding the same information everywhere?




  • Am I finding different versions of the story? (If yes, why might that be?)




  • Where else might I locate additional information about the topic?




  • Which pieces of evidence are most believable and why?

Key Ideas and Details

  • Cite specific textual evidence to support analysis of primary and secondary sources, attending to such features as the date and origin of the information. (RH.9-10.1)


Integration of Knowledge and Ideas

  • Integrate quantitative or technical analysis (e.g., charts, research data) with qualitative analysis in print or digital text. (RH.9-10.7)

  • Compare and contrast treatments of the same topic in several primary and secondary sources. (RH.9-10.9)




  • “This author agrees/disagrees with...”

“This document was written earlier/later than the other, so...”




Universal Design for Learning

Multiple Means of Representation

Multiple Means of Expression

Multiple Means of Engagement




  • Captions

  • Spoken language

  • Visual diagrams

  • Video and audio clips

  • Alternate text size

  • Graphs, charts tables

  • Color used for emphasis, highlighting, or information

  • Simulations

  • Speed, repetition, or timing of video, slides, animation, sound

  • Primed vocabulary to connect to prior knowledge or experiences

  • Emphasis roots of words

  • Clarify or point out patterns, symbols, sequencing, big ideas

  • Present and support concepts with alternative forms of expression (i.e., illustration, dance/movement, diagram, model, comic strip, storyboard, photograph, animation, physical or virtual manipulative)

  • Activating prior knowledge

  • Pre-teaching critical pre-requisites

  • Bridge understanding by using analogies, metaphors

  • Chunk information into smaller elements

  • Mnemonic strategies

  • Checklists and graphic organizers

  • Review and practice




  • Provide alternatives in the requirements for rate, timing, amplitude, & range of motor action necessary to interact with instructional materials, physical manipulatives and technology (e.g., marking with pen/pencil, mouse control)

  • Provide alternatives for interacting with materials (e.g., by hand, voice, switch, joystick, keyboard)

  • Use keyboard commands, options, & customized overlays

  • Compose in multiple media such as text, speech, drawing, visual art, sculpture, or video

  • Provide spell checker, speech to text software, graphing calculators, graph paper, outlining tools, sentence strips, sentence starters, concept mapping,

  • Use web applications (e.g., wikis, animation)

  • Provide scaffolds that can be gradually released with increasing independence & skills

  • Use prompts, models, process think-alouds, and templates for sequencing

  • Set goals, provide checklists, guides for notetaking, & guided questions




  • Provide choices in levels of challenge, types of tools used, color, design, layout of graphics, sequence and timing of tasks

  • Involve students in setting personal goals

  • Vary activities and sources that can be personalized & contextualized to learners lives, that are culturally relevant, responsive and appropriate

  • Design purposeful activities that allow for active participation so that outcomes are authentic and resonates with audiences

  • Invite personal response, evaluation, and self-reflection

  • Use feedback to provide alternative aid

  • Provide prompts to provide & restate goals—calendars, schedules

  • Provide collaboration and peer support

  • Emphasize process, effort, improvement in meeting standards

  • Cooperative learning groups & roles

  • Differentiate degrees of difficulty

  • Provide rubrics

  • Provide recording, charting & displaying of data and templates to support processing
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