Marquette university department of Philosophy Graduate Course Descriptions Spring 2010 (20092) phil 6605 plato



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MARQUETTE UNIVERSITY

Department of Philosophy

Graduate Course Descriptions -- Spring 2010 (20092)

PHIL 6605 - PLATO

(PREREQUISITE(S): Consent of Dept. Chair)

Section 101 -- TTH 8:00-9:15, DR. FRANCO TRIVIGNO

This course is an introduction to the philosophical thought of Plato, including his contributions to ethics,

aesthetics, psychology, politics, epistemology and metaphysics. This course will stress the continuity of

Plato’s thinking by attempting to isolate the philosophical questions that motivate his writings. Some

important themes will include the defense and justification of the life of philosophy, the possibility of

knowledge, the nature of the soul and the quarrel between philosophy and poetry.

TEXTS: PLATO: COMPLETE WORKS, Ed. J. Cooper. Hackett, 1997 , Selected secondary literature.
PHIL 6640 - ST. THOMAS AQUINAS

(PREREQUISITE(S): Consent of Dept. Chair)

Section 101 -- TTH 9:30-10:45, DR. RICHARD TAYLOR

The primary focus of study in this course is the metaphysics, epistemology and psychology of Thomas

Aquinas. In each of these areas Aquinas drew from the Greek pagan, Christian and Islamic (and Jewish)

traditions but formulated his own innovative and distinctive views on the nature of being, the process of

knowing, and the essential nature of the human soul along lines considered insightful and compelling by some

of his contemporaries and radically rationalist by some other contemporaries. The innovative philosophical

rationalism of this theologian gave rise to other important and long lasting insights and analyses, such as his

conceptions of the relation of science of sacred doctrine and philosophy, the distinction of essence and

existence, the natural character of human embodied knowing, an ‘Aristotelian’ account of the human body

and soul compatible with Christian doctrine on resurrection, and much more. These themes and issues will be

considered philosophically and historically. If class size permits, students will present preliminary drafts of

the course paper in class seminars. Class participation will include some student exercises of presentation and

analysis of key texts and ideas. Attendance and quality and quantity of classroom discussion will be

considered among the measures for the grade for class participation.

COURSE WEBSITE (under construction):

http://web.mac.com/mistertea/Phil_217/Welcome.html

TEXTS:

BASIC WRITING OF SAINT THOMAS AQUINAS: GOD AND THE ORDER OF CREATION (Basic



Writings of St. Thomas Aquinas) (Paperback)

ST THOMAS AQUINAS: QUESTIONS ON THE SOUL, tr. James Robb, Marquette University Press

Aquinas, ON BEING AND ESSENCE, tr Maurer, Pontifical Institute of Mediaeval Studies

REQUIREMENTS:

Grading will be based on two exams (20% each), class participation (20%) and a final course paper of 20+

pages (40%).

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PHIL 6650 - DESCARTES

(PREREQUISITE(S): Consent of Dept. Chair)

Section 101 -- MW 9:00-10:15, DR. TIMOTHY CROCKETT

This course will provide an intensive introduction to Descartes’s views on physics, metaphysics and

epistemology. We will begin by examining Descartes’s views on method as presented in the RULES FOR

THE DIRECTION OF THE MIND. After a brief overview of Scholastic science, we will work slowly

through the MEDITATIONS. We will supplement our studies of the MEDITATIONS with readings from

the OBJECTIONS AND REPLIES, the PRINCIPLES, and several important pieces of secondary literature.

Some of the issues we will discuss in this section include the method of doubt, the Cartesian circle,

Descartes’s mode of presentation in the MEDITATIONS, the creation and ontological status of the eternal

truths, and the real distinction between mind and body. We will conclude with an examination of Cartesian

physics. The central text for this section will be the PRINCIPLES OF PHILOSOPHY.

TEXTS: Cottingham, Stoothoff and Murdoch, trans. THE PHILOSOPHICAL WRITINGS OF

DESCARTES, VOLS. I & II. (Cambridge). Cottingham, Stoothoff, Murdoch and Kenny, trans. THE

PHILOSOPHICAL WRITINGS OF DESCARTES: CORRESPONDENCE, VOL. III. (CAMBRIDGE).

REQUIREMENTS:This course will be taught in seminar style. Students will be expected to do one class

presentation, and to write a final critical paper. In addition, students will occasionally be asked to write

short argument summaries and textual analyses, and will be asked to participate in commentary on the

course readings.

PHIL 6660 - KANT

(PREREQUISITE(S): Consent of Dept. Chair)

Section 101 -- TTH 2:00-3:15, DR. JAVIER IBANEZ-NOE

The main objective of this course will be to provide a careful reading of two ground-works of modern

philosophy, the CRITIQUE OF PURE REASON, and the CRITIQUE OF PRACTICAL REASON. Emphasis

will be placed on mastering the structure and arguments of both books, but an attempt will also be made to

situate Kant's thought within the history of modern philosophy.

TEXTS: CRITIQUE OF PURE REASON, CRITIQUE OF PRACTICAL REASON; Allen Wood, KANT.


PHIL 6664 - HUSSERL

(PREREQUISITE(S): Consent of Dept. Chair)

Section 101 -- TTH 12:30-1:45, DR. POL VANDEVELDE

Through a careful reading of some of his major works, the course offers an overview of Husserl's

philosophy in investigating some of the basic concepts of phenomenology. Our goal will be twofold,

historical and systematic:

HISTORICAL ASPECT:

After situating Husserl in the history of philosophy, we will reconstruct Husserl's path of thinking in three

main periods: 1) The early Husserl and the breakthrough of phenomenology in the LOGICAL

INVESTIGATIONS; 2) the intermediate period of idealism with IDEAS: GENERAL INTRODUCTION TO

PURE PHENOMENOLOGY; the late Husserl with the CARTESIAN MEDITATIONS and THE CRISIS OF

EUROPEAN SCIENCES.

SYSTEMATIC ASPECT:

Our leading question will be the question of categories and language: How does Husserl achieve his goal of

maintaining a phenomenology that is anchored in the life-world while claiming a transcendental point of

view? We will take into consideration some contemporary interpretations or applications of Husserl's

views, concerning especially the notion of "intention": Hubert Dreyfus, Dagfinn Foellesdal, John Searle.

TEXTS:


- Selection from LOGICAL INVESTIGATIONS

- Selection from IDEAS 1 and IDEAS 2

- CARTESIAN MEDITATIONS

- CRISIS OF EUROPEAN SCIENCES

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PHIL 6670 - CLASSICAL AMERICAN PHILOSOPHY

(PREREQUISITE(S): Consent of Dept. Chair)

Section 101 -- TTH 11:00-12:15, DR. STANLEY HARRISON

A study of central themes and authors of the "classical" period in American philosophy [c. 1865 - 1950],

with particular attention to the emergence and significance of pragmatism as an indigenous response to

central issues involved in Cartesianism, British empiricism, Kantianism, et al., and to emerging issues in the

19th - 20th centuries such as Darwinism, anti-foundationalism, scientific materialism etc. Authors will

include Charles Peirce, Wm. James, John Dewey, Josiah Royce, and time permitting, some contemporaries

such as Richard Rorty. Readings will include Peirce's seminal essays (e.g., "The Fixation Of Belief," "How

To Make Our Ideas Clear," etc.) James' PRAGMATISM, THE PHILOSOPHY OF JOHN DEWEY, John

McDermott (ed), and other provocative works..

REQUIREMENTS: Regular class participation, a mid-term exam, short response papers and a final

research paper [c. 15-20pp.]

PHIL 6953 - TEXT/SEMINAR ON ANCIENT PHILOSOPHY:

(PREREQUISITE(S): Consent of Dept. Chair)

Section 101 -- MW 11:00-12:15, DR. OWEN GOLDIN

[Section Title: Presocratics, Sophists and Plato's Euthydemus]

This seminar will be in three parts. The bulk of the class will be spent working through the extant evidence

for presocratic philosophy. We will discuss the unique historical problems posed by the study of the

presocratics, and will consider the divergent scholarly and philosophical traditions from which they have

been approached. Special attention will be paid to Heraclitus and Parmenides. In the second part of the

semester we will explore the philosophical contributions of the sophists. The concluding weeks of the

semester will be devoted to Plato's EUTHYDEMUS, in which Socratic and Platonic themes begin to be

developed as responses to earlier philosophy.


REQUIRED TEXTS: Kirk, Raven and Schofield: THE PRESOCRATIC PHILOSOPHERS; Dillon and Gergel:

THE GREEK SOPHISTS; Long: CAMBRIDGE COMPANION TO EARLY GREEK PHILOSOPHY.


OPTIONAL TEXT: Barnes: EARLY GREEK PHILOSOPHY.
REQUIREMENTS: Grading will be on the basis of two papers and class discussion.

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PHIL 6959 - SEMINAR:



(PREREQUISITE(S): Consent of Dept. Chair)

Section 101 -- TTH 3:30-4:45, DR. MICHAEL MONAHAN

[Section Title: Justice and the Politics of Recognition]

While the belief that the “recognition” of oneself and others is fundamental to political and moral life goes

back at least to Fichte (and Hegel), the early 1990’s saw a renewed interest in the concept of recognition

with the publication both of Axel Honneth’s The Struggle for Recognition in English and Charles Taylor’s

seminal essay “The Politics of Recognition”. In the ensuing decade and a half, the uses, abuses, virtues, and

limitations of recognition have been a recurring theme in political and moral theory. This course engages

with the concept of recognition as it has been employed in this more recent body of literature (though the

relation between its recent resurgence and its historical antecedents will be explored), taking up the role of

recognition in our thinking about freedom, justice, and political and/or moral agency.
TEXTS: Nancy Fraser and Axel Honneth, REDISTRIBUTION OR RECOGNITION?, Axel Honneth, THE

STRUGGLE FOR RECOGNITION, Patchen Markell, BOUND BY RECOGNITION, Kelly Oliver,

WITNESSING: BEYOND RECOGNITION, Charles Taylor, MULTICULTURALISM: EXAMINING THE

POLITICS OF RECOGNITION


REQUIREMENTS: One term paper, one class presentation, and a final exam

Section 102 -- MW 1:00-2:15, DR. NOEL ADAMS

[Section Title: Skepticism, Paradox, and the Limits of Explanation]

This course focuses on philosophers who have tried to show that attaining knowledge is impossible or in

some significant way deeply problematical. Some skeptics, such as Zeno and Kierkegaard, seem to simply

have a kind of wonder that certain paradoxes cannot be adequately solved. Others, such as Sextus Empiricus,

took on academic philosophers in order to show why systems were doomed. Not all philosophers have

responded to skeptics and puzzle-makers in the same way. Some philosophers, such as Descartes, are deeply

concerned with meeting the challenge of a certain kind of skepticism, whereas others, such as Aristotle, are

not. Some philosophers, such as Bertrand Russell, are worried about paradoxes, but seem almost embarrassed

about having such concern. In this course we will examine the reasons, for taking skeptics and puzzle-

makers seriously in the historical context in which the arguments of the respective philosophers arose. We

will also examine thoroughly what lies at the heart of the skeptical impulse and consider what gives rise to

skepticism in the first place.


REQUIRED TEXTS: PARADOXES, R.M. Sainsbury, 3rd edition. Cambridge University Press, 2009.

A BRIEF HISTORY OF THE PARADOX, Roy Sorenson, Oxford University Press, 2003;


PHILOSOPHICAL SKEPTICISM, Eds., Charles Landesman & Roblin Meeks, Blackwell Publishing, 2003.

SKEPTICISM: A CONTEMPORARY READER, Eds., Keith DeRose & Ted A. Warfield, Oxford University

Press, 1999.

THE HISTORY OF SCEPTICISM: FROM SAVONAROLA TO BAYLE, Revised and expanded edition,

Richard H. Popkin, Oxford University Press, 2003.

SKEPTICISM: THE CENTRAL ISSUES, Charles Landesman, Blackwell Publishers, 2002.


RECOMMENDED TEXT: TRUTH, PROBABILITY, AND PARADOX, J.L. Mackie, Oxford University

Press, 1973.


REQUIREMENTS AND GRADED DETERMINATION: There will be one in-class presentation and two

papers due. Grade determination: first paper = 30%, second paper = 55%, participation = 15%.

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PHIL 6960 - SEMINAR IN APPLIED/PROFESSIONAL PHILOSOPHY

(PREREQUISITE(S): Consent of Dept. Chair)

Section 701 -- W 5:00-7:40, DR. KEVIN GIBSON

Overview:

This seminar will study ethical issues that cut across professions and disciplines. We will begin by looking at

the nature of a profession or discipline, to see whether the categorization has moral significance. We will

review some selected works from classical ethical theory and how some philosophers have approached issues

such as lying, loyalty, whistle-blowing, informed consent, confidentiality, group and individual responsibility,

allocation of resources and questions of rights. We will apply these works to specific cases in professional

settings. There will be a midterm paper and final research paper. Students must be willing to participate



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