Life in the 1930’s



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Life in the 1930’s

5th Grade

Samantha Preisch

10/4/2011

Professor Erin Evans

Contents
Focus………………………………………………………………….…….………..1st White Tab
Summary of Subject Content…………………………………………………...……....1st Red Tab
Concept Map…………………………………………………………………………1st Green Tab
Benchmarks……………………………………………………………………….…1st Purple Tab
Daily Schedule……………………………………………………………………...…1st Blue Tab
School/Student Profiles……………………………………………………………...2nd White Tab
Lesson Plans 1-10……………………………………………………………………...2nd Red Tab

Supporting Documents and assessments provided with each individual lesson


Portfolio Assessment Plan for Students…………………………………………..…2nd Green Tab
Portfolio Rubric
Checklists………………………………….………………………………………...2nd Purple Tab
References………………………………………………………………………….…2nd Blue Tab

Concept Map

Science

Life in the 1930’s

Math

Music

Physical Education

Language Arts

Social Studies

Art

Technology of 1930’s

Architecture

Costs & the Great Depression

Fractions- chocolate chip cookies

Entertainers of the 1930’s

Baseball

The Hobbit by: JRR Tolkin

Creative Writing Slang

Great Depression

Rise of Nazism

Fiddlesticks”



Art Deco Replicas

Focus

The goal of this unit is to expose the students to the lifestyle and the hardships of the 1930’s. This unit will emphasize cooperative learning to help build a community environment. This team building will allow the students to strengthen the positive classroom atmosphere and show how America bonded together during the tough times of the 1930’s. This unit has multiple forms of assessment in order to ensure that appeals to many of the multiple intelligences. The many forms of assessment will allow all of the students to be engaged and feel successful.



Background Summary

The 1930’s was an amazing era filled with new technology, legendary entertainers, Art Deco, chocolate chip cookies, the start of World War II, new books, architecture, and the hardships of the Great depression. I believe that all students should learn about this time period in order to get a better understanding of their lives today. The 1930’s had some bad, but it also had lots of good. Sometimes in fifth grade students will have to solve major issues in their life, such as, who should I be friends with, how can I get my crush to notice me, and dealing with peer pressure. These are true hardships of the fifth grade that can make or break a person’s year. I want to be able to show the students the hardships that people from the 1930’s had to deal with. They will be able to relate their hardships to the ones of the Great Depression and be able to see the good things that came out of that time frame, as well.

The new technology that came out during that time is very impressive. Some of these inventions changed the way people thought and lived their day-to-day lives. Some inventions that were created during the 1930’s consist of computers, frozen food, color and talking movies, air mail, Scotch Tape, the Volkswagen Beetle, intercontinental airline flights, and the bass guitar. These are all pieces of technology that are used every day in our society. Some people would not be able to complete tasks and jobs without the invention of these products. Even something as simple as “Scotch tape patented by 3M engineer, Richard G. Drew” (http://inventors.about.com/od/timelines/a/twentieth_4.htm ) changed the way people live. The main point of this lesson is to get the students to understand the importance of these inventions on their lives. The students also get to use their creativity to try to improve these already helpful inventions.

The 19030’s also produced many legendary performers that have shaped the way entertainment is done today. The students will be able to research a performer and tell the class all about that performer. This not only differentiates the instruction, but allows the students to take control of the project and complete the project the way they want to.

Art Deco was a great new style of art that became popular during the 1930’s. “Art Deco is a decorative style that is essentially an extension of the French Art Nouveau and English Aesthetic styles, but also includes elements of Arts and Crafts form.” (http://char.txa.cornell.edu/art/decart/artdeco/artdeco.htm) Art Deco is prevalent in today’s society and can be seen reflected in many of the famous buildings in the United States. Bringing this art piece into the unit will help to engage the students who learn best through art and self expression. It also has to do with geometric shapes which incorporates math into the lesson, as well.

Chocolate chip cookies were accidentally invented in the 1930’s by Ruth Wakefield. “Wakefield was mixing a batch of cookies for her roadside inn guests when she discovered that she was out of baker's chocolate. She substituted broken pieces of Nestle's semi-sweet chocolate, expecting it to melt and absorb into the dough to create chocolate cookies.” (http://www.women-inventors.com/Ruth-Wakefield.asp ) Instead of the chocolate melting into the dough, she created chocolate chip cookies. This lesson fits because the students are required to do fractions in order to double the dough recipe to actually make the cookies. The cookies will be used as a snack and help to motivate the students.

The rise of Nazism, which was the start to World War II, was also on the rise during this time. The Nazis were beginning their discrimination against the Jewish people. For this lesson, the students are not going to focus on the facts of World War II, but more of the concept behind it. They will get a hands-on experience of what it is like to be discriminated against and really be able to sympathize for what happened to these people.

The students will also be required to read the book The Hobbit and complete a literature study packet on the book. This book was written in the 1930’s by J.R.R. Tolken. This book is a widely known book that inspired a movie to be produced. This book allows the students to think outside of what they are used to in life and think about elves, hobbits, and other mythological creatures.

The Great Depression was a difficult time for all people during the Great Depression. Families were torn apart due to financial responsibilities and many people were forced to live in ghettos called “Hoovervilles.” The life-style of these people was completely different from the life-style of many of the people in today’s society. Currently, we are in a recession and times are very tough which makes this topic extremely relatable for the students, but they will also be able to see how good their lives really are. With this lesson, the students will not be focusing so much on facts, but rather the hardships of the people and the concept behind the Great Depression.

So many new and interesting events happened during the 1930’s that I think it is crucial that the students learn how this time frame completely changed the way we live our lives today. This compare and contrasting will help the students to be better problem solvers, understand the history of the United States, and help with character education and anti-bullying. All of these things are vital to the success of the students when they become individual’s of society.



Benchmarks

Language Arts:

1.B.2a Establish purposes for reading; survey materials; ask questions; make predictions;

connect, clarify and extend ideas.

1.C.2d Summarize and make generalizations from content and relate to purpose of material.

2.B.2c Relate literary works and their characters, settings and plots to current events, people and

perspectives.

3.C.2a Write for a variety of purposes and for specified audience in a variety of forms

4.B.2a Present oral reports to an audience using correct language and nonverbal expressions for

the intended purpose message within a suggested organizational format.

5.A.2b Organize and integrate information from a variety of sources

5.C.2b Prepare and deliver oral presentations based on inquiry or research
Math:

6.A.2 Compare and order whole numbers, fractions and decimals using concrete materials,

drawings and mathematical symbols.

6.B.2 Solve one- and two-step problems involving fractions


Science:

11.B.2c Build a prototype of the design using available tools and materials.

11.B.2e Test the prototype using suitable instruments, techniques and quantitative measurements

to record data.

11.B.2f Report test design, test process, and test results

13.B.2b Describe the effects on society of scientific and technological innovations


Social Science:

14.C.2 Describe and evaluate why rights and responsibilities are important to the individual,

family, community, workplace, state and nation

15.A.2a Explain how economic systems decide what goods and services are produced, how they

are produces and who consumes them.

16.C.2c (US) Describe significant economic events including the Great Depression and how it

influenced history.
Physical Development and Health:

21.A.2a Accept responsibility for their own actions in group physical activities

21.B.2 Work cooperatively with a partner of small group to reach a shared goal during physical

activity.


Fine Arts:

26.A.2f Understand the artistic processes of photography

26.B.2d Demonstrate knowledge and skills to create works of visual art using problem solving, observing, designing, sketching, and constructing.

Daily Schedule

Ms. Preisch’s Daily Schedule
8:00-8:30 Getting Ready for the Day 

(Bellwork)



8:30-9:15 Science

9:15-10:00 Social Studies

10:00-10:45 Computers on Monday and Thursday

Library on Tuesday

Art on Wednesdays

TEAM on Fridays



10:45-11:30 Math

11:30-12:30 Lunch/Recess

12:30-1:00 TEAM

1:00-1:45 Language Arts

1:45-2:30 Physical Education

2:30-2:45 Getting Ready to Say Goodbye 

2:45 Dismissal
Today is Going to Be a GREAT Day!

School Profile

St. Paul’s School of the Apostle has the following demographics represented in the chart.

Ethnicity

White- 76%

African American-0.069%

Latino-16%

Asian-0.023%

Academics

0.046% with IEPs

0.116% who are gifted

***There are no ELL students

Gender


61% are male

49% are female

***No students receive free/reduced lunch
St. Paul’s background is extremely different from my own. The school is a catholic school and I was raised as a Baptist. For this reason, I am not able to teach religion in the school. It is very nice to know that religion is a part of the lives of these children. I attended a public school and never had the opportunity of having religion and school mix together.

I also came from a school that is much smaller than St. Paul’s. In the school I attended, 18 students was considered a big class. At St. Paul’s the classes have about 40 students and the grade levels are broken into 2 sections. This is still a relatively small school, but compared to the grade school I attended, it is much larger. In my school, we did not switch classrooms. One class stayed in the same room with the same teacher all year long. The students at St. Paul’s have the opportunity to get up and move to a new class, experience different teaching styles, and get to know a lot more people. This is definitely an advantage for the students for preparing them for high school. Some classes are equipped with Smart Boards, as well. My classroom does not have one, but it is a great learning tool that can easily be incorporated into any lesson to help reach students who learn best through technology.

My grade school had absolutely no diversity in it. It is a nice change to be able to learn from the students about their families and traditions they may have. It really opens my eyes to see a new side of my students and the society of the United States. What may be cool in my town is not cool at St. Paul’s and I like being able to see the difference in opinions. It is important when planning this unit that I try to bring in other cultures as much as possible. This unit is mainly focusing on the United States, but in order to get the students engaged, I must relate it to their own cultures as much as possible.

Student Profiles

Jack is a 6th grade boy who is 11 years old. He is a student with an IEP because he has autism. He is very intelligent, but does not like to participate in class. Jack may look as if he is not participating, but if you ask him a question, he is able to answer it. He has a difficult time with getting his thoughts onto paper, for this reason, he is allowed to do every other problem on his homework assignments. He is functioning at grade level, but does need scaffolding to help him succeed. He does not appear to be struggling with his academics, but he does have a difficult time with social interactions. The rest of the class is very kind and patient with him. They do not bully him because he is different and they accept him as part of their “family.”


Tristan is a 6th grade boy who is 11 years old. He does not have an IEP, but struggles with all subjects in school and is quickly falling behind in his grades. During class, he is constantly talking to the people around him. He can also be disruptive and rude because he does not like the person he sits next to. He makes it very clear that he would like to change seats. He struggles in class, but when working with him one on one it is easy to see that he is very concerned about his academics and wants to try very hard to become successful. He prefers cooperative learning to help keep him engaged and involved in the learning process.
Alison is a 6th grade girl who is 11 years old. She does not have an IEP and is extremely intelligent. She is very dedicated to her academics and always wants to show her classmates how smart she is. She has many friends and is very involved in extra-curricular activities. Alison always wants to be perfect and expects clear instructions for her tasks. It may be difficult to get her involved in the cooperative learning and to allow her to make mistakes in front of her peers. The cooperative learning groups will need to be structured in a way to make her feel comfortable with making mistakes.

Lesson Plans 1-10


Technology

Teacher: Ms. Preisch

Grade: 5th Subject: Science/Social Studies Time: Two 45 minute class periods

1. Materials/Technology:

(Attach copies of worksheets, lecture notes, rubrics, etc.)

Projector with internet access

Frank Sinatra CD

Power Point Presentation

Rubric

Poster board (for students to present their invention to the class)





  1. Illinois Goals, Learning Standards and Benchmark(s) (Include Benchmark Number):

11.B.2c Build a prototype of the design using available tools and materials.

11.B.2e Test the prototype using suitable instruments, techniques and quantitative measurements

to record data.

11.B.2f Report test design, test process, and test results

13.B.2b Describe the effects on society of scientific and technological innovations


  1. Performance Objective(s) – Students will be able to…

(List Lower-Order Knowledge, Higher-Order Knowledge, Skill, and Affect as appropriate)

Students will be able to compare and contrast life in the 1930’s to today. (Higher)

Students will be able to make improvement to an existing piece of technology. (Higher)


  1. Introduction/Anticipatory Set/Advanced Organizer/Focusing Event:

Teacher will dress in clothes that represent the style of the 1930’s and have music by Frank Sinatra playing as the

students walk into the classroom.

Students will watch trailer for the movie “Cinderella Man” http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NyfbsUpRQ8o.

Teacher will explain that the movie was based on a true story from the 1930’s.

Students will create a Venn Diagram to compare and contrast what they saw to today’s society.

Teacher will be sure to point out how technology has evolved since 1930.




  1. Procedures:

(Provide a description of the sequence of the instructional activities. Indicate both teacher and student activities.)

Teacher will present a power point presentation on how technology has evolved and changed the lives of people since 1930.

Ex: You all take pictures when you are with your friends, what would life be like if you had the type of camera they used in the movie?

Teacher will have each team pick one of the pieces of technology presented on to make a presentation.

The students must take their piece of technology and make improvements on it. (see attached rubric)


  1. Closure (set of key questions for comprehension or processing):

Students will present their projects to the class as if they were trying to sell their new product.

Students may present their product through a poster, power point, model, etc.

If time permits, students will be allowed to vote on the top 3 products presented.

Students will create a class bar graph to show which 3 products each student voted for.




  1. Assessment:

Teacher will assess the student’s ability to compare and contrast life in the 1930’s to today through informal observation of Venn Diagram discussion.

Teacher will assess the student’s ability to make improvement to an existing piece of technology through formal observations of presentation.




  1. Accommodations for Individual Needs:

IEP/Autism: Will be allowed to use the computer to help create/research his product. A daily visual agenda will be given.

Behavior: Will sit in the front of the room and will have an index card on his desk. If he acts out, teacher will make a tally on the card as a visual reminder to focus on the lesson.

Gifted: She will be allowed to pick a product not presented on, so that she may research the product and make

improvements as needed.





  1. Homework/Announcements:

Work on the project

Entertainers of the 1930’s

Teacher: Ms. Preisch


Grade: 5th Subject: Fine Arts /Social Studies Time: Two 45 minute class periods

1. Materials/Technology:

(Attach copies of worksheets, lecture notes, rubrics, etc.)

Power Point Presentation

Computers/Research Materials

Rubric



  1. Illinois Goals, Learning Standards and Benchmark(s) (Include Benchmark Number):

4.B.2a Present oral reports to an audience using correct language and nonverbal expressions for

the intended purpose message within a suggested organizational format.

5.A.2b Organize and integrate information from a variety of sources

5.C.2b Prepare and deliver oral presentations based on inquiry or research

.


  1. Performance Objective(s) – Students will be able to…

(List Lower-Order Knowledge, Higher-Order Knowledge, Skill, and Affect as appropriate)

Students will be able to present a biography about a popular entertainer from the 1930’s. (Higher)




  1. Introduction/Anticipatory Set/Advanced Organizer/Focusing Event:

Teacher will show students a Charlie Chaplin silent movie from the 1930’s,


  1. Procedures:

(Provide a description of the sequence of the instructional activities. Indicate both teacher and student activities.)

Teacher will give a biographical presentation on Charlie Chaplin.

Students will research entertainers of the 1930’s and pick one that they would like to research. (Same entertainer cannot be used twice) List is provided, if a student wants to do a different entertainer, it will need approval from the teacher.

Students will make their own presentation of the entertainer they have chosen.




  1. Closure (set of key questions for comprehension or processing):

Students will present their presentation to the class. (see attached rubric)


  1. Assessment:

Teacher will assess the student’s ability to present a biography about a popular entertainer from the 1930’s through formal observation of the presentation. (See rubric)



  1. Accommodations for Individual Needs:

No accommodations can be foreseen, but may be made as necessary.



  1. Homework/Announcements:

None

Entertainers

  • Louis Armstrong

  • Fred Astaire

  • Carl Barks

  • John Barrymore

  • Wallace Beery

  • Humphrey Bogart

  • Charles Boyer

  • James Cagney

  • Frank Capra

  • Charlie Chaplin

  • Claudette Colbert

  • Gary Cooper

  • Joan Crawford

  • Bing Crosby

  • Bette Davis

  • Errol Flynn

  • Henry Fonda

  • Joan Fontaine

  • John Ford

  • Olivia De Havilland

  • Walt Disney

  • Clark Gable

  • Greta Garbo

  • Judy Garland

  • Cary Grant

  • Katharine Hepburn

  • Leslie Howard

  • Boris Karloff

  • Buster Keaton

  • Laurel and Hardy

  • Vivien Leigh

  • The Marx Brothers

  • Paul Muni

  • Laurence Olivier

  • Edward G. Robinson

  • Ginger Rogers

  • Mickey Rooney

  • James Stewart

  • Barbara Stanwyck

  • Shirley Temple

  • The Three Stooges

  • Spencer Tracy

  • John Wayne

  • Orson Welles

Musicians

  • Harold Arlen

  • Louis Armstrong

  • Fred Astaire

  • Count Basie

  • Cab Calloway

  • Eddie Cantor

  • Nat King Cole

  • Noël Coward

  • Bing Crosby

  • Vernon Duke

  • Jimmy Durante

  • Duke Ellington

  • Ella Fitzgerald

  • George Gershwin

  • Ira Gershwin

  • Benny Goodman

  • Coleman Hawkins

  • Billie Holiday

  • Lena Horne

  • Al Jolson

  • Jerome Kern

  • Lead Belly

  • Glenn Miller

  • Édith Piaf

  • Cole Porter

  • Ma Rainey

  • Django Reinhardt

  • Bill "Bojangles" Robinson

  • Rodgers and Hart

  • Frank Sinatra

  • Bessie Smith

  • Fats Waller

  • Ethel Waters

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