Life in Ancient Egypt



Download 201.84 Kb.
Page2/3
Date conversion20.04.2016
Size201.84 Kb.
1   2   3

A description of the object


Age of the object

Anything that has happened to the object since it came into the museum




Date

Period

Rulers

Before 8000 BC

Palaeolithic





5200-4000 BC

Fayum Neolithic





3500-3100 BC

Naqada Period





3100-2686 BC

Early Dynastic Period:

Dynasties 1-2 (Dynasties I-II)




Narmer

2686- 2181 BC

Old Kingdom:

Dynasties 3-6 (Dynasties III-VI)




Khufu

2181-2025 BC

First Intermediate Period:

Dynasties 7-10 (Dynasties VII-X)







2025-1700 BC

Middle Kingdom:

Dynasties 11-13 (Dynasties XI-XIII)







1700-1550 BC

Second Intermediate Period:

Dynasties 13-17 (Dynasties XIII-XVII)







1550- 1069 BC

New Kingdom:

Dynasties 18-20 (Dynasties XVIII- XX)




Akhenaten

Tutankhamun

Ramses II


1069-664 BC

Third Intermediate Period:

Dynasties 21-25 (Dynasties XXI-XXV)







664-525 BC

Late Period:

Dynasty 26 (Dynasty XXVI)







525- 404 BC

Persian Period:

Dynasty 27 (Dynasty XXVII)







404-332 BC

Late Dynastic Period:

Dynasties 28-31 (Dynasties XXVIII-XXXI) (332-323)




Alexander the Great

323-30 BC

Ptolemaic Period


Cleopatra

30 BC- AD 640

Roman Period


Constantine

AD 640- present

Islamic Period

Saladin


Timeline
Take a moment and go over Roman Numerals with your class. The museum uses Roman Numerals on labels and in reference to dynasties. It will be less confusing for the students if they can recognize them as numbers, and they will be able to figure out the sequential order of the periods more easily.

1

I

16

XVI

2

II

17

XVII

3

III

18

XVIII

4

IV

19

XIX

5

V

20

XX

6

VI

21

XXI

7

VII

22

XXII

8

VIII

23

XXIII

9

IX

24

XXIV

10

X

25

XXV

11

XI

26

XXVI

12

XII

27

XXVII

13

XIII

28

XXVIII

14

XIV

29

XXIX

15

XV

30

XXX


Museum Floor Plan
Museum Floor Plan Key

Main Room: (up the stairs)
On the left hand side you will find 19 Inscription cases (IC). These are full of stone reliefs usually with writing and pictures carved on them. Like the pots they range in date and the writing ranges from Hieroglyphs, through Greek and ending with Arabic.

Cases A - H: These contain the earliest objects found in Egypt from the Palaeolithic times and they go through until the Middle Kingdom. You will find examples of flints, palettes, bowls and stone vessels.

On the right of the gallery you will find Cases A – H and WEC11: These contain a range of objects from the Old Kingdom through to the Roman period in Egypt. You will find weights and measures, small sculpture, tools and weapons and objects of daily use. There is also a selection of Roman mummy portraits and a mummy case.



Through the white doors:
Here you will find cases containing figurines, soul houses and model boats


Pottery Room:
Here you will find lots of pottery. Petrie was 'the father of pots' because he discovered so many different sorts. The earliest pots start in pottery case 2 (PC) and date from 7,000 years ago and they end in PC 37 with pottery about 1,500 years old. Also in this gallery you will find linen tunics and a bead net dress. These all come from the Old Kingdom around the time of the Great Pyramid.

True/FalseFacts and misunderstandings about Egyptians.


Egyptians today still mummify their dead.

True / False

The ancient Egyptians wrote on papyrus.

True / False

The mummy’s curse does exist.

True / False

Egyptians today still read and write in hieroglyphs and Egyptian children learn it in schools.

True / False

The period known as ‘ancient’ Egypt lasted 300 years.

True / False

60 million people live in Egypt today.

True / False

The ancient Egyptians worshipped many different gods and goddesses.

True / False

At one time the capital city of Egypt was Memphis. Today, it is Cairo.

True / False

All the pharaohs of ancient Egypt were men.

True / False

The ancient Egyptians were excellent at maths and this helped them to build the pyramids.

True / False

The River Thames flows through Egypt.

True / False

The pyramids were built as royal palaces for the Pharaohs.

True / False

Ancient Egyptian children played with toys and even grown up played games.

True / False

TEACHERS COPY

True/False – Facts and misunderstandings about Egyptians.



Egyptians today still mummify their dead.

False

The ancient Egyptians wrote on papyrus.

True


The mummy’s curse does exist.

False-this myth originated in the 19th century.

Egyptians today still read and write in hieroglyphs and Egyptian children learn it in schools.

False-they speak, read, and write in Arabic.

The period known as ‘ancient’ Egypt lasted 300 years.

False-it spanned more than 3,000 years

60 million people live in Egypt today.

False-it is 86.7 million as of 2015.

The ancient Egyptians worshipped many different gods and goddesses.

True

At one time the capital city of Egypt was Memphis. Today, it is Cairo.

True

All the pharaohs of ancient Egypt were men.

False-Queen Hatshepsut was a pharaoh and there have been many more.

The ancient Egyptians were excellent at maths and this helped them to build the pyramids.

True-Scribes were trained in geometry and arithmetic. The ancient Egyptians were also very advanced in medicine.

The River Thames flows through Egypt.

False-the River Nile flows through Egypt and is 1/913 miles long. It rises in Ethiopia.

The pyramids were built as royal palaces for the Pharaohs.

False-they were built 4,500 years ago as tombs in which to bury dead pharaohs.

Ancient Egyptian children played with toys and even grown up played games.

True- dolls, toy mirrors, pots and even board games like Senet can be seen at the Petrie.

Investigating Objects — My Favourite Object

Description:

What size is it? _____________________________________________

What colour is it? ___________________________________________

What material is it made of? (for example: glass, clay, wood, stone, paper, cloth, or metal)

__________________________________________________________

What shape is it? ____________________________________________



Draw: What does it look like? Use:

What do you think it is?

__________________________

__________________________

__________________________



Who do you think used it?

__________________________

__________________________

__________________________



What do you think it was used for?

___________________________

___________________________

___________________________



When do you think it was used?

__________________________

__________________________


By: J. Gibbon



Preparing a Tomb in ancient Egypt


A dead person’s family would fill his or her tomb with objects that would help him or her live comfortably in the afterlife. Items such as clothes, food, toys, gamers, pots, make-up, jewellery, tools, weapons and even a model house or boat (which they believed would become life sized in the afterlife) were all put into tombs.


Choose 10 objects to go inside a wealthy person’s tomb. You can write them or draw them in the box below!

By: J. Gibbon



Comparing Everyday Life Then and Now

Select two objects from the Museum that

you can compare to items you use today.


Object 1:


  1. Name of Object: ____________________________________________




  1. Object number: UC__________________________________________




  1. Description of the object and what it was used for:__________________

__________________________________________________________

__________________________________________________________




  1. How is it similar/different to something you might use today?

____________________________________________________________

____________________________________________________________

____________________________________________________________

____________________________________________________________
Object 2:


  1. Name of Object: ____________________________________________




  1. Object number: UC__________________________________________




  1. Description of the object and what it was used for:__________________

__________________________________________________________

__________________________________________________________




  1. How is it similar/different to something you might use today?

____________________________________________________________

____________________________________________________________

____________________________________________________________

____________________________________________________________


By: J. Gibbon



Comparing Everyday Life Then and Now

Think about your daily life and imagine what life was like in Ancient Egypt.



Fill out the diagram below to see the similarities and differences.





My Life




http://school.phillipmartin.info/school_soweek_boy1.gif



Similarities




https://s-media-cache-ak0.pinimg.com/originals/59/e1/4a/59e14aafb6edee94f0e559657fa875d1.gif


Life if Ancient Egypt



By: J. Gibbon



Meaningful Ways to Follow-up the visit

  1. Reflecting

A great and simple way to follow up the visit is to have a class discussion back in school in the next history lesson:


  • What was your favourite object in the Museum and why?

  • Were there any objects that surprised you? Why?

  • What have you learned about Egypt that you did not know before?

  • What kinds of materials did the ancient Egyptians use to make things?

  • What was good about the Petrie Museum?

  • What was bad about the Petrie Museum? What would you do to solve these issues?

  • Has the visit made you think about the ancient Egyptians in a different way?

2. Measuring Learning

Ask pupils the same 4-5 key questions in the first lesson after the visit that you asked them in the last lesson before the visit to see what has been learned/ how perceptions have changed, etc.

Questions might include:



  • Where in the world is Egypt?

  • What objects do you think survive today from ancient Egypt?

  • What do you think an archaeologist does?

  • How are we similar to the ancient Egyptians? (think of 2 ways)

  • How are we different to the ancient Egyptians? (think of 2 ways)

  • Would you have liked to live in ancient Egypt? (say why or why not)

  • Do you think it is right for museums to display human remains?

  • Do you think museums in Britain should return ancient Egyptian artefacts to Egypt?




  1. Asking Questions

Often pupils come up with questions related to the Museum and the objects they have seen sometime after the visit. They can email any outstanding questions to the Petrie Museum at t.golding@ucl.ac.uk and we will do our best to respond as quickly as we can.




  1. Debating Issues:

A visit to the Petrie Museum can really prepare pupils for a range of debates back

in school:


  • How much do we have in common with the ancient Egyptians?

  • Do you think it is right for museums to display human remains?

  • Do you think museums in Britain should return ancient Egyptian artefacts to Egypt?

5. Group presentations

Pupils can present their findings to the rest of the class from their museum-based research (See Research Task: Every Day Life)


6. Online Learning

Pupils can find out more about objects in the Petrie Museum by using the online catalogue. Go to www.petrie.ucl.ac.uk and click ‘Online Catalogue’. They could even create their own online gallery and write their own object labels.



Additional Sheets

The next few pages contain additional sheets that can help supplement your experience at the Petrie Museum. Depending on what your class is learning, different sheets may apply. These sheets can be useful during or after the visit.



Coins, Coins, and more Coins!http://www.ucl.ac.uk/museums-static/digitalegypt/metal/archive/uc72049.jpg

The Ptolemies

The first coins in Egypt are dated back to the Late Dynastic Period. They were most likely produced to pay Greek soldiers serving the Egyptian king. There were also Persian coins that were created by the Persian king Artaxerxes III. From the Ptolemaic Period on coins were made regularly in Egypt.http://www.ucl.ac.uk/museums-static/digitalegypt/metal/archive/uc72049.jpg

Since Egypt has no great silver mines and gold coinage was not very practical for daily use, the Ptolemies used bronze coins. These coins were usually used at the local market and were not likely to travel outside of Egypt.

1   2   3


The database is protected by copyright ©essaydocs.org 2016
send message

    Main page