Lesson: The February Revolution Rationale for the Lesson



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Andrew Kozlowsky





Lesson Plan 2 Overview

Unit Topic: The Russian Revolution
Lesson: The February Revolution
Rationale for the Lesson:


  • The February Revolution was not the first revolution in Russian history, nor was it the last; however, it was during this revolt that the autocratic rule of the Tsar came to an end. This lesson will accomplish the objective of giving students a deeper look into the causes of the February Revolution. This objective will be achieved through a combination of the “Flipped Lesson” model and station activities within the classroom.


Standards:


  • NJCCCSSS: 6.2.12.D.4.c: Assess the causes of revolution in the 20th century (i.e., in Russia, China, India, and Cuba), and determine the impact on global politics.




  • NCSS Theme: #6 Power, Authority, and Governance: Social Studies teachers should possess the knowledge, capabilities, and dispositions to organize and provide instruction at the appropriate school level for the study of Power, Authority, and Governance.



  • CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RH.11-12.7 Integrate and evaluate multiple sources of information presented in diverse formats and media (e.g., visually, quantitatively, as well as in words) in order to address a question or solve a problem.


Essential Question:


  • How can political, economic, and social conditions lead to a revolution?


Objectives:


  • Students will be able to analyze images/cartoons to comprehend the underlying conditions that led to the February Revolution, as well as collaborate and draw conclusions in regards to the social, economic, political, and military causes of the February Revolution.


Preliminary Component (Flipped Lesson)


  • The night before class, students will watch a video (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v= 7NLNJ-GCccw) detailing the February Revolution and complete a graphic organizer (see materials)


Lesson Opener:


  • Students are pre-selected into heterogeneous groups (5 groups of 6 students) which are displayed on the board (See modifications) and are to discuss the essential question, which will be written on the board: How can political, economic, and social conditions lead to a revolution? They will need to use their completed graphic organizers to answer this question in their notebooks.


Step-by-Step Procedures:


  1. (5 minutes) Lesson Opener. Each student given the handout packet (see materials) to be filled in as activity proceeds). Have each group share at least one cause for the February Revolution with the class.




  1. (4 minutes) Introduction. Model a sample analysis (see image 6 on page 10) of an image. Describe the cognitive process of analyzing an image (ie. gather evidence, interpret evidence, make hypotheses from the evidence).




  1. (2 minutes) First station. Students analyze image of Rasputin at their station silently and gather evidence.




  1. (3 minutes) Students discuss their observations, interpret the evidence and together decide on a hypothesis, which will be written in their analysis packet.




  1. (30 seconds) Students rotate to the next station.



  1. (2 minutes) Second station. Students analyze image of the bread riots and silently gather evidence.




  1. (3 minutes) Students share their observations, interpret the evidence and create one hypothesis for the group.




  1. (30 seconds) Students rotate to the next station.



  1. (2 minutes) Third station. Students analyze image of workers strike silently and write down observations in their notebook.

  2. (3 minutes) Students discuss their observations, interpret the evidence by answering the questions in their analysis packet and create a group hypothesis.




  1. (30 seconds) Students rotate to the next station.




  1. (2 minutes) Fourth station. Students analyze image of injured soldiers returning from the front lines independently.




  1. (3 minutes) Students share their observations with the group, interpret evidence and create a group hypothesis.




  1. (30 seconds) Students rotate to the next station.




  1. (2 minutes) Fifth station. Students analyze image of the hierarchy silently and gather evidence independently.




  1. (3 minutes) Students discuss their observations with each other, interpret the evidence and create a group hypothesis.




  1. (8 minutes) Students share their findings in a group discussion. Students then revisit the essential question; How can political, economic, and social conditions lead to a revolution? Write down their responses on the board.

Lesson Closure/Closing Activity:


  • Students will complete an exit pass. They will need to write down at least four main causes of the February Revolution.


Materials and Equipment Needed:

  1. February Revolution Graphic Organizer (see below)


Cause: ____________________________________________________________

Evidence: __________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________



Cause: ________________________________________________________

Evidence:________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________



The February Revolution



Cause: ________________________________________________________

Evidence: ____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________



Cause:

________________________________________________________

Evidence: ________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Cause: ________________________________________________________

Evidence: _____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________






  1. Handout Packet (see Appendix A)




  1. Image 1: Translation: “Russia’s Ruling House” (Rasputin)

http://www.lookandlearn.com/history-images/XM10102592/Rasputin-Caricature





  1. Image 2: Bread Riots, February 23, 1917.





  1. Image 3: Russian workers on strike in Petrograd (St. Petersburg), on the 22nd of February 1917.





  1. Image 4: April 4th, 1917. Injured soldiers returning from the front lines.





  1. Image 5: From the top: We reign; we pray for you; we judge you; we guard you; we feed you; AND YOU WORK!





8. Image 6: Ivan Vladimirov (Modeling example for students)


Gathering Evidence: I see: Red flag, soldiers, painting of Tsar Nicholas II with gold frame, fire, celebrating


Interpreting Evidence: Time period: during the Revolution because they would not be allowed to do this in previous times. This may have taken place at an aristocrat’s home or a palace because only the rich could afford such an ornate painting and frame. It seems like these people are planning on burning the painting of the Tsar in the fire.


Making Hypotheses: These people were angry at the Tsar because of the poor living conditions. They are burning his painting to show their anger. Also, there seem to be soldiers there cheering, so he must have lost the respect of some of the military. The man in the lower right hand may also be saluting the painting, which shows that even though they were angry with the Tsar, they still held him in high esteem.






Assignment:


  • Independent research for homework: Find one image (that wasn’t used in class) that represents a cause of the February Revolution. Then write a letter from the perspective of the person in the image to a family member explaining what is going on at the time of the photograph. The letter must be at least 1 page typed and may include other things (causes of the Revolution) that were happening at the same time.

Assessment:


  • The homework will be used as an assessment. Also, the causes of the February Revolution will be a question on the next quiz/test.

Modifications:


  • Students are grouped in heterogeneous groups (pre-chosen by myself) to ensure an even distribution of high and low-performing students. Also, using images/cartoons allows even the slowest readers (ELLs) an equal opportunity to analyze and participate in the group discussion.


Appendix A
Analysis Packet

Instructions: You will be allotted 5 minutes at each station. Every station has a photo/cartoon/image placed on it. Use this guide to analyze the images you see. You may use information from your graphic organizers to complete this packet.

Good luck!!!


Image 1
Gather Evidence (What do you see?)

Interpreting Evidence
1. How does this image portray Tsar Nicholas II and Tsarina Alexandra?

2. How does this image portray Rasputin?

Hypothesis
Who might have drawn this cartoon and what was the purpose of drawing it? (Use evidence)

Image 2
Gathering Evidence


Interpreting Evidence


1. Where might this scene be taking place?

2. What is happening in this scene?

Hypothesis
How were these women feeling? Why were they rioting? (Use evidence)

Image 3
Gathering Evidence

Interpreting Evidence
1. Where might this scene be taking place? (Give at least one piece of evidence to support your claim)

2. What do you think is happening in this scene? (Give at least one piece of evidence to support your claim)


Hypothesis


Describe how these people were feeling at the time of the strike. Does this reinforce or correct your knowledge from the video? Why? (Use evidence)

Image 4
Gathering Evidence

Interpreting Evidence
1. How are these soldiers feeling?

2. What are the conditions like for the soldiers?


Hypothesis


What can this picture tell you about the success of the Russian military in WWI? (Use evidence)

Image 5
Gathering Evidence


Interpreting Evidence


1. Which groups are at the top of this hierarchy, which are at the bottom?

2. Where might this poster have been hung up?


Hypothesis


Which group might have created this? What is the purpose of this cartoon? (Use evidence)


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