Lesson Plan: Out of Many, One Context of the lesson within the project



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Curricula for K-12 Civics Education


Lesson Plan: Out of Many, One

Context of the lesson within the project: This lesson is the first lesson centered around the idea of the importance/relevance/significance of our nation’s symbols, both man-made and natural.

Standards Addressed

5.7..5 Discuss the meaning of the American creed that calls on citizens to safeguard the liberty of individual Americans within a unified nation, to respect the rule of law, and to preserve the Constitution.

5.7.3 Understand the fundamental principles of American constitutional democracy, including how the government derives its power from the people and the primacy of individual liberty.
Core Standard: 2.7 Creative Expression: Students communicate values, opinions or personal insights through an original work of art.

Core Standard: Historical and Social Sciences Analysis skills #3: Students explain how the present is connected to the past, identifying both similarities and differences between the two, and how some things change over time and some things stay the same.

Civics Standards, grade 5: Know the songs that express American ideals (e.g., “America the Beautiful,” “The Star Spangled Banner”).

Common Core State Standards for ENGLISH LANGUAGE ARTS & Literacy in History/Social Studies, Science, and Technical Subjects K-5

College and Career Readiness Anchor Standards for Speaking and Listening K-5
Comprehension and Collaboration

  1. Prepare for and participate effectively in a range of conversations and collaborations with diverse partners, building on others’ ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively.




  1. Integrate and evaluate information presented in diverse media and formats, including visually, quantitatively, and orally.




  1. Evaluate a speaker’s point of view, reasoning, and use of evidence and rhetoric.


Objective(s):

  • Students will research and interview people about symbols

  • Students will have the opportunity to engage in discourse and begin to understand that there can be more than one point of view.

  • Design a symbol/crest representing who you are.



Lesson Plan: Out of Many, One
Essential Questions/Issues:

  • Why are our nation’s symbols important?

  • How does the use of symbols help convey a message?


Lesson Plan: Out of Many, One
Assessment:

Students will write a paragraph describing their symbol and its’ significance.




Lesson Plan: Out of Many, One
Lesson Activity Steps:


  1. KWL chart regarding symbols




  1. Teacher shows history channel video about statue of liberty, L Is For Liberty, find other videos of other nations’ symbols—flags, bald eagle, Liberty Bell, Star-Spangled Banner.




  1. Sing the Star Spangled Banner and discuss meaning in groups and share-out




  1. Use history/social studies text to discover symbols.




  1. Interview adults/parents about symbols of America that portrays America for parents. See homework, handout.




  1. Students will then design a crest which symbolizes who they are. Students will begin in class and finish at home.




  1. Students also write a paragraph describing and defining their crests.




  1. Student work will be shared and displayed in class and in office.


EL and Special Needs:

By incorporating visual (video, reading), auditory (interview, discussion), shared reading, all students have the opportunity to access curriculum. Working in small groups will also provide role models for language.



Lesson Plan: Out of Many, One
Materials and Resources Needed:

Reflections Social Studies text, grade 5; videos (Brain Pop, PBS for Teachers, L is For Liberty; art materials ( 8x8 white paper, colored pencils, markers, rulers),



Lesson Plan: Out of Many, One
Vocabulary:

SYMBOL noun

1.

something used for or regarded as representing something else; a material object representing something, often something immaterial; emblem, token, or sign.



2.

a letter, figure, or other character or mark or a combination of letters or the like used to designate something: the algebraic symbol x; the chemical symbol Au.

3.

a word, phrase, image, or the like having a complex of associated meanings and perceived as having inherent value separable from that which is symbolized,  as being part of that which is symbolized,  and as performing its normal function of standing for or representing that which is symbolized:  usually conceived as deriving its meaning chiefly from the structure in which it appears, and generally distinguished from a sign.



–verb (used with object)
Origin:
1400–50; late Middle English  < Latin symbolum  < Greek sýmbolon  sign, equivalent to sym- sym-  + -bolon,  neuter for bolḗ  (feminine) a throw

Handout:

Name____________________________________
Symbols—Here and There

We have been talking about symbols and their importance in our nation’s history. Now it’s your turn to be the researcher. Your assignment is to discuss with a parent the following questions (and maybe some of your own!):




  1. Mom, Dad, Grandma: When you think about the United States, what is the FIRST symbolic image that comes to mind and why?




  1. Mom, Dad, Grandma: When you think about the natural beauty of the United States, what is the FIRST symbolic image that comes to mind and why?




  1. Mom, Dad, Grandma: If you were born in another country, what is the first symbolic image that comes to mind of __________________ and why?




  1. Mom, Dad, Grandma: If you were born in another country, When you think about the natural beauty of ________________________, what is the FIRST symbolic image that comes to mind and why?




  1. Additional comments: this is your space to add more regarding the discussion you had with your family members. Please try and discuss with all adults in your house. I imagine all of you will be surprised by the responses!



Lesson Plan: Out of Many, One
Outline of Unit Plan: Out of Many, One.


CVCS-Lesson1-Becker-all 04/16/2012

This curriculum does not necessarily reflect the views of the Judicial Council, the AOC, or the Court Programs and Services Division/CPAS.  Furthermore, the authors, the Judicial Council, the AOC, and the Court Programs and Services Division/CPAS do not provide any warranties regarding the currency or accuracy of the information in these works. Users are reminded to check the subsequent history of any case and changes to statutes and Rules of Court cited in the works before relying on them. These works are provided for the personal noncommercial use of teachers and may not be used for any other purpose without the written permission of the authors.


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