Learning Together Through Faiths Weddings sion 4



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Learning Together Through Faiths
Weddings




SION 4


What this unit contains

This unit provides an opportunity to find out about weddings as part of a number of focuses on change and the cycle of life across Key Stages 1 and 2.

As they work through the unit, in relation to the faiths studied, pupils will examine the following areas:


  • Ways of celebrating (What do people do?)

  • The story (Who is it all about?)

  • The community (Whose celebration is this?)

  • The symbols (Why do they do that?)

  • The inner meaning (What is it really about?)

Pupils should study weddings in the Christian tradition and that of one other faith from Hinduism, Judaism and Sikhism. Teachers need to emphasise that there are many family experiences and many ways that people choose to live – this unit will focus on the choice of marrying a partner and setting up a home together. Teachers need to be sensitive to the experience of pupils whose parents’ marriages have not lasted.



Where the unit fits and how it

builds upon previous learning

This unit provides an opportunity of focusing in depth on one Rite of Passage, Weddings, as part of a focus on change and the cycle of life.




Extension activities and further

thinking




  • In session four research a wedding celebration from a faith other than Christianity and the other faith being covered by the class.





Vocabulary



SMSC/Citizenship


  • Public commitment to a partnership

  • Journey of life

  • Promises and vows




wedding

page boy

Sikh

Rabbi

Christian

best man

Judaism

Tallit

Christianity

father of the bride

Jew

Henna

bride groom

organist

choir

Sindur

wedding rings

Hinduism

Cantor

Puja

usher

Hindu

(c)huppah

Ganesh

priest

promises

Ketubah

mangal sutra

vicar

vows

Mazel tov

garlands

bridesmaid

Sikhism


Mitzvah


shanhai musi



Session 1. Key Question: What special times have we shared with others?



Learning objectives


A

T

1

A

T

2


Suggested teaching activities



Sensitivities, points to note, resources


Pupils should:


  • know that there are different stages in life when people share common human experiences;




  • reflect on special times they have shared.






As a class, talk about and make a class list of celebrations pupils have taken part in.



Resources

‘Weddings’ resource pack from South London Multifaith and Multicultural Resources Centre Wedding pictures from any website.

Personal/children’s parents wedding pictures (if appropriate)
BBC Active DVD ‘Rites of Passage’ and ‘Celebrations and Special Times’; ‘What do people do when they celebrate special times?’

Short Response sheet


Notes for Teachers:

Teachers need to be aware of different family structures of children within their class and ensure that their approach and the children’s understanding are inclusive.





What is a celebration? Watch the ‘Introduction to the idea of family celebrations’ in the BBC Active DVD. Extend pupils’ understanding of a celebration, using examples from the class to illustrate.






Make a simple timeline and help pupils to share and list life experiences, both secular and religious, e.g. it’s my birthday, when mum had a new baby, when we went to a wedding.







Explore the experiences in a number of ways e.g.

Who is it all about?

What did the people do?

Why did they do it?

Whose celebration was it?

What was it really about?







On a short response sheet, pupils should draw and write about one of their special experiences, these can contribute towards a class display of happy times.




Session 2. Key Question: What is a wedding?



Learning objectives


A

T

1

A

T

2


Suggested teaching activities



Sensitivities, points to note, resources


Pupils should:





  • know that the celebration is called a wedding;




  • understand that a wedding is sometimes celebrated in a faith community;




  • understand that a wedding is a way for a family to celebrate a stage in the lives of two people.







Recap with the children the special times explored in the last session and share some of their work. Talk about the journey of life and introduce the idea that a wedding is also a special time of celebration.



Resources

Photos of traditional Christian weddings.

BBC Whiteboard Active DVD ‘Rites of Passage’ Unit 4 ‘A world of weddings’.
Notes for Teachers:

Pupils need to understand that weddings do take place outside of places of worship. Also that not every

partnership goes on to be a wedding and that some families do not feel they want to be married.




Ask the class if they have been to any weddings. What is a wedding? Make a list of what happens during a wedding. Explain that sometimes people get married in a civil service and sometimes in a place of worship, if possible link to examples of weddings attended by members of the class.






Look at various pictures of a Christian wedding or watch one of the Christian wedding services taking place in the BBC Active DVD, freezing the film as necessary. Discuss with children what is happening in these pictures and how people are feeling during the service.




What are the key ways in which people celebrate weddings? Do they have special clothes or eat special food? Do they give gifts or send cards?




Make a class record organising information about a wedding using the headings introduced in the previous lesson:

Who is it all about? (i.e. the couple getting married)

What did the people do?

Why did they do it?

Whose celebration was it?

What was it really about? (i.e. telling everyone that you are changing your life as individuals and becoming a family)




Session 3 and 4. Key Question: What happens in a Christian wedding?



Learning objectives


A

T

1

A

T

2


Suggested teaching activities



Sensitivities, points to note, resources


Pupils should:


  • know that Christians celebrate a wedding with their family, friends and the wider Christian community;




  • know what happens during a traditional Christian wedding;



  • know some of the symbols of a Christian wedding and understand their meaning;




  • understand that a wedding is celebrating the story of a relationship and asking God to bless it.









During these two sessions pupils will find out more about Christian weddings.




Resources

Bride magazines

Pictures from catalogues or magazines of engagement rings, wedding rings, wedding clothes.

Wedding invitations

Photographs
Role play material such as dressing up clothes e.g. bridesmaids dresses, suits,

top hats, plastic flowers, tiara, invitations etc.






With the class recall what they saw on the video clip from the previous lesson. Explain that historically the bridegroom had to ask permission of the bride’s father to ask her to marry him. When this had happened and the bride had agreed to get married, the couple are ‘engaged’. Then they could prepare for their wedding. Talk about the preparations that pupils think will be needed for a wedding. Who will need to be invited? Where will it be held?






Visit a church to see the place where a wedding might take place or invite in a Minister to talk about the preparations that take place before the wedding. Ask the Minister to discuss what happened during the wedding service, particularly the promises that are made and the symbolism of the ring. Discuss with pupils what the Christian wedding is really about. Talk about the vows that are made. They give the couple the opportunity to make a promise to each other about their love. They do this in front of their family and friends and God.




Either:


  • act out parts of the wedding

  • suggest the promises that pupils feel the couple should make to each other

  • make a collage of a wedding scene

  • make wedding invitations or cards

  • Select one other faith from the following for your next lesson: Judaism, Hinduism or Sikhism.











Session 5a. Key Question: What happens in a Jewish wedding?



Learning objectives


A

T

1

A

T

2


Suggested teaching activities



Sensitivities, points to note, resources


Pupils should:


  • know what happens during a Jewish wedding;




  • understand that the celebration is shared with family, friends and the faith community;




  • know some of the symbols in a Jewish wedding;




  • understand the inner meaning of a Jewish wedding.






Examine pictures/ video/ DVD of a Jewish wedding. What do people do? Focus on preparations, the ceremony and the sequel.




Resources

BBC Active DVD ‘Rites of Passage’ Unit 4


www.yeshautyisrael.com/wedding






Discuss - who is it about? Consider the role of the bride, groom, and the groom’s two male witnesses, parents of the bride, the groom’s family, bridesmaid/attendants, cantor and Rabbi.







Where is it conducted, and why? Who is there to share? i.e. the community, family and friends. Jews believe that marriages are made in heaven so when a couple is married they are often referred to as a ‘heaven blessed’ couple






Talk about the symbols in a Jewish wedding, e.g. clothes and accessories, wedding rings and stamping on the wine glass.




Focus pupils on what it is really all about; bring out the idea that the two

separate people are becoming one.



Prepare group to talk to the class during the next lesson about how a Jewish wedding is similar or different to a Christian wedding.






Children could design an invitation to a Jewish wedding using Jewish symbols.






Session 5b. Key Question: What happens in a Hindu wedding?



Learning objectives


A

T

1

A

T

2


Suggested teaching activities



Sensitivities, points to note, resources


Pupils should:


  • know what happens during a Hindu wedding;




  • understand that the celebration is shared with family, friends and the faith community;




  • know some of the symbols in a Hindu wedding;




  • understand the inner meaning of a Hindu wedding.







Show pictures/video of a Hindu wedding, ask children what can they see in the pictures? Talk about whose celebration it is i.e. the community, family and friends.


  • Can you tell who the bride and groom are? How can you tell?

  • What do you notice about the clothes the people wear?

  • Where is it conducted and why? Does a wedding have to happen in a temple or can it be conducted anywhere?


Resources

www.ngfl.ac.uk

www.bbc.co.uk/religions
BBC Whiteboard Active DVD ‘Rites of Passage’ Unit 4
Wedding music

Hindu wedding video


Teachers notes:

Hindu weddings





Explain that Hindus believe that fire is God, so they take their vows by circling the fire and make it their witness. Discuss what the ceremony is really all about; drawing out the idea that the two separate people are becoming one.







Using videos, websites and books find out:



  • How many days do the ceremonies last for?

  • What other rituals happen before the wedding day?

  • Why are the colours worn by the bride so different from those worn by Christian brides?

  • Explanations for symbols in the wedding, e.g. clothes and accessories, henna for the bride, garlands, coconut, mangal Sutra (necklace that symbolises that a woman is married).





Prepare group to talk to the class during the next lesson about how a Hindu wedding is similar or different from a Christian wedding.






Children could:







Session 5c. Key Question: What happens in a Sikh wedding?



Learning objectives


A

T

1

A

T

2


Suggested teaching activities



Sensitivities, points to note, resources


Pupils should:


  • know what happens during a Sikh wedding;




  • understand that the celebration is shared with family, friends and the faith community;




  • know some of the symbols in a Sikh wedding;




  • understand the inner meaning of a Sikh wedding.





Show pictures/video of a Sikh wedding, ask children what can they see in the pictures? Talk about whose celebration it is i.e. the community, family and friends.



  • Can you tell who the bride and groom are? How can you tell?

  • What do you notice about the clothes the people wear?

  • Where is it conducted, and why? Does it have to happen in a Gurdwara or can it be conducted anywhere?


Resources

www.sikhfoundation.org
A Sikh wedding- Olivia Bennett

The wedding pack- South London

Multifaith and Multicultural Resource Centre, Lewisham LDC.
BBC Whiteboard Active DVD ‘Rites of Passage’ Unit 4



Explain that Sikhs believe the Guru Granth Sahib is their sacred book, so they take their vows by circling the book and make it their witness. Discuss what the ceremony is really all about; drawing out the idea that the two separate people are becoming one.







Using videos/DVDs, websites and books find out:



  • How many days do the ceremonies last for?

  • What other rituals happen before the wedding day?

  • Why are the colours worn by the bride so different from those worn by Christian brides?

  • Symbols in the wedding





Prepare group to talk to the class during the next lesson about how a Sikh wedding is similar or different from a Christian wedding.






Children could:



  • design invitation cards using wedding symbols

  • make henna patterns






Session 6. Key Question: What do we know about weddings?



Learning objectives


A

T

1

A

T

2


Suggested teaching activities



Sensitivities, points to note, resources


Pupils should:


  • clarify similarities and differences between weddings they have studied in the unit.





Pupils should share what they have found out about weddings in the faiths they have studied and also any weddings they have attended.




Resources

Books:


Ceremonies and Celebrations –

Weddings.


Wedding Days – Celebrations of

Marriage, by Anita Ganeri









As a class discuss what is similar between the religions:



  • Families

  • Invitations

  • Clothes

  • Promises and vows

  • Celebration party

  • Giving of gifts

  • All dress up

  • The bride and the groom have special clothes

  • Flowers






What is different between the religions:



  • The time span of the wedding

  • Rituals

  • Promises

  • Symbols



Assessment Task:



  • Why are weddings in places of worship shared with many people? How are they shared with God?




Assessment Levels
Level 1
Attainment target 1
Pupils use some religious words and phrases to recognise and name features of religious life and practice. They can recall religious stories and recognise symbols, and other verbal and visual forms of religious expression.
Attainment target 2
Pupils talk about their own experiences and feelings, what they find interesting or puzzling and what is of value and concern to themselves and to others.
Level 2
Attainment target 1
Pupils use religious words and phrases to identify some features of religion and its importance for some people. They begin to show awareness of similarities in religions. Pupils re-tell religious stories and suggest meanings for religious actions and symbols. They identify how religion is expressed in different ways.
Attainment target 2
Pupils ask, and respond sensitively to questions about their own and others’ experiences and feelings. They recognise that some questions cause people to wonder and are difficult to answer. In relation to matters of right and wrong, they recognise their own values and those of others.
Response sheet
A special time in my life that I shared with others was


SE

SSION 1

Notes for Teachers Hindu Weddings


A Hindu wedding ceremony is the second of the four Ashrams. Each Ashram has specific duties or dharma that a person must follow. The Grihasta Ashram is known as household life and for taking an active role in the care and protection of ones family and responsibility to society. Wedding ceremonies in the UK are traditionally conducted in the ancient language, Sanskrit and brief translations can be given by the priest.
The pre-wedding ceremonies include an engagement, (involving Vagdhana, an oral agreement). A Lagna Patra, a written declaration, and arrival of the marriage party at the bride’s residence, often in the form of a marriage procession. The post-marriage ceremonies involve welcoming the bride to her new home.
An important thing to note is that despite the fact that the modern Hinduism is based on the Puja, the worship of devas as enshrined in the Puranas. A Hindu marriage ceremony is essentially a Vedic yajña (a fire-sacrifice). The primary witness of a Hindu marriage is the fire-deity (or the Sacred Fire) Agni dev, and by law and by tradition, no Hindu marriage is deemed complete unless in the presence of the Sacred Fire, seven encirclements have been made around it by the bride and the groom together.
IMPORTANT MARRIAGE CEREMONIES: Hindu marriage ceremonies vary in different regions and according to family traditions. The major ceremonies are the following.


  • Ganesh Puja - Invoking Lord Ganesh to remove obstacles.

  • Agni Puja - Evoking the holy fire as a witness and seeking his blessings.

  • Kanyάdάna - Giving away the bride to the groom. Of many auspicious charities.




Giving your daughter in marriage is considered one of the most auspicious. As a condition for offering his daughter for marriage, the father of the bride requests a promise from the groom for assisting the bride in realizing their spiritual and material duties. The groom makes the promises by repeating them three times.

  • Mangalsutra – Tying of holy necklace on bride.

  • Saptapadi/Saat Phere – The Seven Holy Steps circling the fire.

  • ´ilάrόhana – Bride steps on the stone.

The ceremonies involve the Pandit (priest) chanting various prayers and mantras. Saat phere is an important part of the wedding ceremony, undertaken by the bride and the groom around a sacred fire. Saat means seven and Phere means circumambulation. The vows taken in front of Agnidev, the fire God, who acts both as a witness and one who offers his blessings. The vows or promises are considered sacred and unbreakable. The bride and groom circumambulate the fire seven times

reciting the following prayers:

1. With the first step, the couple asks God for plenty of pure and nourishing food. They promise to share this with the less fortunate.

2. With the second step, the couples pray to give them the mental, physical and spiritual strength to lead a healthy life. They promise to share their joys and sorrows.

3. The third step is for preserving wealth, prosperity and virtuous, noble and heroic children. They promise to live with honour and respect.

4. With the fourth step, they pray for attainment of happiness and harmony by mutual love and trust between themselves and within the family including, respect for elders.

5. With the fifth step, they pray for the welfare of all living beings in the Universe. They promise to protect and give in charity to the vulnerable in society, including children and the elderly.

6. With the sixth step, to give them a long, joyous life and togetherness forever.

7. With the seventh, and last, step, for understanding, companionship. They promise each other loyalty and unity with love and sacrifice.


Cover of a typical Hindu Wedding invitation





Hindu Glossary
Ashrams: Four stages of life and development:


  1. Bramachari Ashram or Student Life – Learning, values and qualities.

  2. Grihasta Ashram: Married Life/Householder – Married Life. Responsibility to family and Society. To give charity and help the poor and vulnerable.

  3. Vanaprastha Ashram: Retired Life – Devotee more time to spiritual matters.

  4. Sannyasa Ashram: Renounced Life- Devotee more time to spiritual matters.

Dharma: Religious and social responsibilities and duties.

Grihasta: Married life and responsibility to family and society.

Vagdhana: An oral agreement of marriage.

Lagna Patra: A written declaration of marriage.

Puranas: Hindu holy scriptures.

Puja: Ceremony.

Agni Dev: Fire God.

Ganesh Puja – Ceremony Invoking Lord Ganesh to remove obstacles.

Agni Puja – Ceremony evoking the holy fire as a witness and seek his blessings.

Kanyάdάna – (Kanya – unmarried woman, dana,-charity). Considered one of the highest acts of charity. A father gives his daughter’s hand in marriage to

the groom.



Mangalsutra - Tying the holy necklace on the bride.

Saptapadi – Taking seven steps or vows.

Saat Phere (Saat- seven, Phere- circumbulating) – The Seven Holy Steps circling the fire.

Śilάrόhana – Bride steps on the stone.


Lewisham Agreed Syllabus for Religious Education 2009

KEY STAGE 1 UNITS – 5.




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