Justice ministers 3 Secretary’s foreword 4 About us 5



Download 4.74 Mb.
Page1/42
Date conversion02.06.2016
Size4.74 Mb.
  1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   ...   42


Justice ministers 3

Secretary’s foreword 4

About us 5

Who we are 5

Our focus 5

What we do 5

Key facts and figures 2013–14 5

Organisational chart as at 30 June 2014 6

Our divisions 7

Our Regional Service Network 9



Output performance 12

Overview 13

Output: Policing services 13

Output: Enhancing community safety 15

Output: Infringement and orders management 18

Improving the efficiency of court processes 21

Overview 21

Output: Court services 21

Supporting the rule of law 25

Overview 25

Output: Access to justice and support services 25

Output: Public prosecutions 29



Protecting individual rights and encouraging community participation 30

Overview 30

Output: Protecting community rights 30

Output: Privacy regulation 32

Output: State electoral roll and elections 33

Promoting community safety through effective management of prisoners and offenders and provision of opportunities for rehabilitation and reparation 33

Overview 33

Output: Prisoner supervision and support 33

Output: Community based offender supervision 36



Minimising injury and property loss through a coordinated and integrated emergency response 38

Overview 38

Output: Emergency management capability 38

Promoting responsible industry behaviour and an informed community through effective regulation, education, monitoring and enforcement 42

Overview 42

Output: Promoting and protecting consumer interests 42

Output: Gambling and liquor regulation and racing industry development 44



Promoting and monitoring integrity within the public sector 48

Overview 48

Output: Anti-corruption and public sector integrity 48

Output: Freedom of Information Commissioner 49



Five-year financial summary and review of financial conditions 51

Disclosure of grants and other transfers 52

Operating statement for the year ended 30 June 2014 155

Balance sheet as at 30 June 2014 157

Statement of changes in equity for the year ended 30 June 2014 158

Cash flow statement for the year ended 30 June 2014 159

Administered items statement for the year ended 30 June 2014 160

Attorney-General 163

Bushfire Response 164

Consumer Affairs 164

Corrections 164

Liquor and Gaming Regulation 164

Police and Emergency Services 164

Racing 165

Acts administered by the Justice Portfolio as at 30 June 2014 166

Legislation enacted in 2013–14 (passed between 1 July 2013 and 30 June 2014) 173

Reconciliation of executive numbers at 30 June 2014 179

Recruitment services 182

Learning and development 183

Safety and wellbeing 186

Carers Recognition Act 2012 189

Disability and diversity 189

Environmental performance 190

Energy 191

Water 192

Paper and procurement 193

Sustainable transport and fleet 194

Waste 196

Communication and training 197

Partnerships and land management 197

Disclosure of major contract compliance 199

Consultancies engaged in 2013–14 199

Government advertising expenditure 199

Victorian Industry Participation Policy 200

Risk attestation for the Department of Justice 2013–14 202

Insurance attestation for the Department of Justice 2013–14 202

National competition policy 202

Statement of compliance with the Building Act 1993 203

Freedom of Information Act 1982 204

Protected Disclosures Act 2012 205

Reviews completed in 2013–14 206

Prison performance data validation reviews 207

Incident reviews 207

Reviews begun in 2013–14 207

Impact of reviews 207

Prisoner and offender deaths 208

Independent Prison Visitors 208

Escapes from custody in Victoria 211

Deaths of prisoners in custody in Victoria 211

Drug testing in Victorian prisons 211

Self-harm, assaults and offender care in Victorian prisons 211

National Corrective Services performance comparisons 211

Business operations 212

Standards for the prevention and management of emergencies 214

Duties of the Emergency Services Commissioner 214

Monitoring of Victoria’s emergency management arrangements 214

Performance of the Emergency Services Telecommunications Authority 214

Reporting and advising the minister on issues relating to emergency management 215

Emergency Alert 216

Assisting community relief and recovery 216

Delegations 216


Justice ministers

Dear ministers

Annual Report 2013–14

In accordance with the Financial Management Act 1994, I am pleased to present the Department of Justice Annual Report for the year ended 30 June 2014.

Yours sincerely

Greg Wilson

Secretary


Department of Justice

September 2014

The Hon. Dr Denis Napthine MP

Premier
Minister for Racing

The Hon. Robert Clark MP

Attorney-General

The Hon. Edward O’Donohue MP

Minister for Corrections

Minister for Crime Prevention

Minister for Liquor and Gaming Regulation

The Hon. Kim Wells MP

Minister for Police and Emergency Services

Minister for Bushfire Response

The Hon. Heidi Victoria MP

Minister for Consumer Affairs
Secretary’s foreword
The 2013–14 Annual Report records another significant year for the department.

Across the board, the department has been managing significant reforms in areas as diverse as infrastructure upgrades; better management of offenders on parole; emergency management; public sector integrity; business, gambling and liquor regulation; and racing industry development.

Key highlights include:

• 51 Bills introduced to Parliament, representing just under half of Bills considered by Parliament. These include significant bail, sentencing, family violence and Working with Children Check reforms, improvements to the civil justice system, the Victoria Police Act 2013 and the Gambling Regulation Amendment (Pre-commitment) Act 2014

• a large program of asset development, including the opening of 938 new prison beds, new police stations, courts and emergency management facilities

• recruitment of 655 new prison officers

• implementation of the 23 recommendations from the Callinan Review of the parole system to ensure parole is only granted when reoffending risk has been appropriately addressed

• preparation for the establishment of Court Services Victoria on 1 July 2014 as the independent statutory agency responsible for the provision of administrative facilities and services to the courts, the Victorian Civil and Administrative Tribunal and the Judicial College of Victoria

• piloting of a weekend remand court in Melbourne. This pilot is a partnership between the department, the Magistrates’ Court, Victoria Police and Victoria Legal Aid to reduce the numbers of people being held on remand

• sustained efforts to improve the collection of unpaid fines, infringements and outstanding warrants

• continuation of the important work of the Aboriginal Justice Agreement 3 to reduce Koori over-representation in the criminal justice system

• delivery of the Community Crime Prevention Program, including Reducing Violence Against Women and Children and Koori Safety grants

• preparation for the establishment of Emergency Management Victoria on 1 July 2014 as the over-arching body for of all emergency preparation, response and recovery in Victoria

• RentRight, a smartphone app that helps tenants understand their rights and responsibilities

• racing track development grants.

An organisational restructure was also undertaken to consolidate policy functions under deputy secretaries and include regional management within the senior executive team. This new structure is providing improved coordination, integration and governance between policy and program design and regional service delivery.

The achievements outlined in the Annual Report have been made possible through the dedicated efforts of over 7,000 staff working in the department and over 90,000 volunteers who support our work, particularly as emergency management volunteers and honorary justices. I would like to thank them for their contribution to the department’s successful delivery of a wide range of justice initiatives.

Greg Wilson
Secretary
Department of Justice

September 2014


About us

Who we are

The Department of Justice leads the delivery of justice services in Victoria. The department’s overarching vision is for a safe, just, innovative and thriving Victoria.

Our focus

The department’s focus is to provide:

• safer communities

• a responsive, efficient justice system

• well-equipped emergency services

• responsible, balanced regulation

• excellence in service delivery.

What we do

The department provides justice-related services to the community and ensures the efficient and effective operation of the justice system in Victoria. This is achieved through the oversight of eight ministerial portfolios:

Attorney-General

• Bushfire Response

• Consumer Affairs

• Corrections

• Crime Prevention

• Liquor and Gaming Regulation

• Police and Emergency Services

• Racing.

The department has productive partnerships with more than 80 statutory authorities and offices, and the support of more than 90,000 volunteers.

The department’s extensive service delivery responsibilities range from managing the Victorian prison system to providing consumer information and enforcing court warrants. The department also manages the development of a range of laws, develops and implements policy and regulation in areas across the portfolio (such as in gaming, liquor, racing and emergency management) and aims to ensure that all elements of the justice system are working effectively.

The department delivers its services across eight regions throughout Victoria. There are 24 Justice Service Centres that provide or assist in providing services through:

• Community Correctional Services

• Consumer Affairs Victoria

• Dispute Settlement Centre of Victoria

• Regional Aboriginal Justice Advisory Committees

• Registry of Births, Deaths and Marriages

• Sheriff’s Operations

• Victims Support Services.

The Department of Justice also operates three mobile Justice Service Centre buses across all regions that ensure services can be accessed by those living in rural and regional areas.

Key facts and figures 2013–14



Frontline services




Visits to www.justice.vic.gov.au

696,242

Visits to www.consumer.vic.gov.au

2,372,794

Smartphone app downloads

FireReady

RentRight

591,481


10,368

Clients assisted at Justice Service Centres (average monthly)

32,712

Kilometres travelled by mobile Justice Service Centres (Justice buses)

100,503

Calls to Victims of Crime Helpline

10,181

Number of victims assisted by the Victims Assistance and Counselling Program

8,493

Births, Deaths and Marriages: number of certificates issued

361,043

Policing and infringements




Warrants actioned

964,043

Infringement notices issued

3.06 million

Community safety




Square metres of graffiti removed

330,100

Working with Children Check applications processed

223,900

Incidents in which Emergency Alert used

104

Crime prevention grants administered

$5.78 million

Industry




Victorian Racing Industry Fund grants made

$9.52 million

Victorian Racing Industry Fund grants made (number)

133

Policy and regulatory activities




Number of Acts administered – Justice Portfolio

204

Number of Justice Portfolio Bills passed by parliament

35 (of 92 Bills)

Total residential tenancies bond transactions

419,135

Organisational chart as at 30 June 2014

Our divisions

This year the department modified its structure to put more emphasis on delivering integrated services to the community, strengthening regulatory practice and enhancing collaboration across policy and program areas.

The department’s nine divisions are complemented by the Regional Service Network. The network was created this year to bring the department’s eight service regions into four areas, each under the leadership of a Regional Executive Director. The regions are described on pages 8–10.

The department’s peak committee—the Justice Senior Executive Group (JSEG)—is made up of the Secretary, the deputy secretaries, five executive directors, the Chief Financial Officer, the Director of People and Culture and the Commissioner for Corrections.

Civil Justice

The Civil Justice division provides policy advice and support for civil law matters (including human rights, native title and public sector integrity matters) and courts and tribunal matters within the Attorney-General’s legislative program. It also provides support to the Attorney-General as first law officer of the state, and oversees the operation of a number of independent statutory agencies responsible to the Attorney-General. The division provides services through the Dispute Settlement Centre of Victoria and the Registry of Births, Deaths and Marriages. It continues to advise the Attorney-General on courts and judicial policy issues following the creation of Court Services Victoria on 1 July 2014.

Criminal Justice

The Criminal Justice division provides policy support and advice to the Attorney-General, Minister for Police and Emergency Services and the Minister for Crime Prevention on the criminal justice system. It is responsible for community crime prevention programs, the provision of services to victims of crime, support for Victoria’s honorary justices and the Working with Children Check. It also oversees the delivery of Victoria’s infringements and road-safety camera systems and the Sheriff’s Office.

Corrections

The Corrections division ensures the safe and secure management of prisoners and individuals on Community Correction Orders. It manages operations of Victoria’s 11 public prisons and one transition centre. It oversees contracts for the management of two privately operated prisons and operates more than 50 Community Correctional Services locations across the state. Justice Health sets the policy and standards for health care in prisons. It oversees the health care delivered across the prison system and contract manages the public prisons’ health service providers.

Emergency Management

This division strengthens community safety by providing policy advice across the emergency management sector. It advises on investment priorities and effective resource use to maintain and build the individual and combined capacity and capabilities of Victoria’s emergency service agencies. It focuses on effective governance, interoperability and building the capacity of professionals and volunteers to contribute to emergency management.

On 1 July 2014 the division transitioned to Emergency Management Victoria, under the joint leadership of the Emergency Management Commissioner and Emergency Management Victoria’s chief executive, who remains a Deputy Secretary of the department. The Office of the Emergency Services Commissioner transitioned to the Inspector-General for Emergency Management, which is now located in the department’s Regulation division.

Regulation

This division combines consumer protection regulation with assurance functions, including the Office of Correctional Services Review and the Inspector-General for Emergency Management. Business units in the division will share best practice regulatory, monitoring and review approaches, systems and resources to provide for improved system outcomes in consumer protection, correctional services and emergency management.

Liquor, Gaming and Racing

This division provides strategic policy advice and support to the Minister for Liquor and Gaming Regulation and the Minister for Racing on liquor, gambling and racing portfolio issues. The division develops and implements legislation and regulation and provides advice on current and emerging issues affecting the portfolios. It also manages selected racing industry initiatives and racing related licensing and appeal matters and provides secretarial and policy support to the Responsible Gambling Ministerial Advisory Council, the Liquor Control Advisory Council and the Live Music Roundtable. The division works closely with the independent Victorian Commission for Gambling and Liquor Regulation and the Victorian Responsible Gambling Foundation.

Service Strategy Reform

The Service Strategy Reform division delivers enhanced economic and data modelling and analysis, supports regions in delivering place-based initiatives, drives further integration of services, tackles over-representation of Koories in the justice system, and leads and manages divisional, regional and whole-of-Government transformation and reform projects.

Corporate Governance and Infrastructure

This division oversees the key public accountability requirements of the department including finance, procurement, performance reporting, risk and audit. It also manages the governance of the portfolio’s major infrastructure and information and communications technology projects.

People and Stakeholders

This division is responsible for leadership on workforce matters including human resource policy and strategy, recruitment, development and retention of staff, and occupational health and safety management. Its functions include coordination of cabinet and the parliamentary processes, Executive Council appointments and advice, Freedom of Information, information privacy, records management policy and administration of the department’s electronic records. The division also provides communication advice and manages community education and awareness campaigns.



Our Regional Service Network

The Regional Service Network1 comprises four areas, covering the department’s eight operational regions across Victoria. Through the network, local leadership in service delivery is strengthened and regions have a greater role in departmental governance and priority-setting.

Each regional service area covers two regions and is headed by an executive director, supported by a regional director.

Central Area

North Metropolitan region

This region includes Melbourne’s central business district as well as its northern suburbs of Broadmeadows, Carlton, Collingwood, Greensborough, Heidelberg and Reservoir.

The region has a population of approximately 990,100 across eight local government areas including the inner-metropolitan areas of Yarra, Moreland, Banyule and Darebin and the outer-metropolitan growth areas of Hume and Whittlesea and the semi-rural area of Nillumbik. Nearly one-third of residents were born overseas and one-third speak a language other than English at home. Approximately 7,000 people (0.7 per cent of the population) identify as being of Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander background.

Justice Service Centres are located at Broadmeadows and Carlton. Community Correctional Services reporting locations include Greensborough, Heidelberg, Reservoir and the Neighbourhood Justice Centre in Collingwood. The region also operates the maximum-security Melbourne Assessment Prison and the minimum-security Judy Lazarus Transition Centre.

West Metropolitan region

Located in Melbourne’s west this region includes the suburbs of Essendon, Footscray, Melton, Sunshine and Werribee.

The region has a population of approximately 740,800 across six local government areas: the inner-metropolitan areas of Maribyrnong, Moonee Valley and Hobsons Bay and the outer-metropolitan areas of Brimbank, Melton and Wyndham. Thirty-seven per cent of residents were born overseas and 39 per cent speak a language other than English at home. Approximately 4,700 people (0.6 per cent of the population) identify as being of Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander background.

A Justice Service Centre is located in Werribee with Community Correctional Services reporting locations at Melton and Sunshine. The region has three maximum-security prisons including the state-operated Dame Phyllis Frost Centre for women, the Metropolitan Remand Centre and the privately operated Port Phillip Prison. Development of a new Public Private Partnership 1,000-bed medium-security male prison is underway at Ravenhall.

West Area

Barwon South-West region

Located in Victoria’s south-west this region includes the major regional centres of Geelong, Portland and Warrnambool.

The region has a population of approximately 363,800 across nine local government areas: Colac-Otway, Corangamite, Glenelg, Moyne, Greater Geelong, Queenscliff, Southern Grampians, Surf Coast and Warrnambool. Ten per cent of the region’s residents were born overseas and nearly seven per cent speak a language other than English at home. Approximately 4,300 people (1.2 per cent of the population) identify as being of Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander background.

Justice Service Centres are located at Geelong and Warrnambool with Community Correctional Services reporting locations located at Hamilton, Portland and Colac. The region operates two of the state’s prisons, the maximum-security Barwon Prison and the medium-security Marngoneet Correctional Centre.

Grampians region

Located in Victoria’s mid-west this region includes the major regional centres of Ararat, Ballarat and Horsham. The region has a population of approximately 221,000 across 11 local government areas: Ararat, Ballarat, Golden Plains, Hepburn, Hindmarsh, Horsham, Moorabool, Northern Grampians, Pyrenees, West Wimmera and Yarriambiack. Approximately eight per cent of residents were born overseas and approximately four per cent speak a language other than English at home. Approximately 3,000 people (1.3 per cent of the population) identify as being of Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander background.

Justice Service Centres are located at Ballarat and Horsham. Community Correctional Services reporting locations are also located at Stawell, Ararat and St Arnaud. The region also has two prisons, the medium-security Hopkins Correctional Centre and the minimum-security Langi Kal Kal prison.

South Area

South-East Metropolitan region

This region covers a large area from the inner city to the Mornington Peninsula and includes suburbs as diverse as Box Hill, Dandenong, Dromana, Frankston, Lilydale, Moorabbin, Port Melbourne, Ringwood and St Kilda.

The region is the most heavily populated of all justice regions, with approximately 2.35 million people. The region delivers justice services across 17 local government areas: Bayside, Boroondara, Cardinia, Casey, Port Phillip, Frankston, Glen Eira, Greater Dandenong, Kingston, Knox, Manningham, Maroondah, Monash, Mornington, Yarra Ranges, Stonnington and Whitehorse. Almost one-third of residents were born overseas and 25 per cent speak a language other than English at home. Approximately 10,700 people (0.5 per cent of the population) identify as being of Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander background.

Justice Service Centres are located in Dandenong, Box Hill, Frankston, Moorabbin, Lilydale and Ringwood.

Gippsland region

Located in Victoria’s south-east, this region includes the major centres of Bairnsdale, Morwell, Sale and Traralgon.

The region has a population of approximately 255,100. It is responsible for the delivery of services across six local government areas: Bass Coast, Baw Baw, East Gippsland, Latrobe City, South Gippsland and Wellington. Approximately 13 per cent of residents were born overseas and five per cent speak a language other than English at home. Approximately 4,700 people (1.8 per cent of the population) identify as being of Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander background.

Justice Service Centres are located in Morwell, Bairnsdale, Sale and Korumburra, with co-located services in other towns. Wulgunggo Ngalu Learning Place in Won Wron supports up to 18 Koori men undertaking Community Correction Orders. The region also has the Fulham Correctional Centre, a privately operated medium-security prison.

North Area

Loddon Mallee region

Located in Victoria’s north-west this region includes the major centres of Bendigo, Swan Hill and Mildura. Geographically it is the largest of the eight operational regions. The region has a population of approximately 320,100 people.

The region delivers Justice services across ten local government areas: Greater Bendigo, Central Goldfields, Macedon Ranges, Mount Alexander and Loddon in the south of the region; and Buloke, Campaspe, Gannawarra, Swan Hill and Mildura in the north. Almost 10 per cent of residents were born overseas and five per cent speak a language other than English at home. Approximately 7,200 people (2.3 per cent of the population) identify as being of Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander background.

The region provides services from Justice Service Centres in Bendigo, Mildura and Swan Hill and at Community Correctional Services reporting locations in Kyneton, Kerang, Robinvale, Castlemaine, Maryborough, Echuca and Ouyen. The region is home to the minimum-security Tarrengower Prison and Loddon Prison (mixed restricted minimum and medium security).
Hume region

The Hume region is located in Victoria’s north-east and includes the major centres of Wangaratta, Wodonga and Shepparton.

The region has a population of approximately 260,100 across 12 local government areas: Alpine, Benalla, Greater Shepparton, Indigo, Mansfield, Mitchell, Moira, Murrindindi, Strathbogie, Towong, Wangaratta and Wodonga. About 11 per cent of residents were born overseas and seven per cent speak a language other than English at home. Approximately 5,700 people (2.1 per cent of the population) identify as being of Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander background.

Hume delivers a range of services through Justice Service Centres at Wangaratta, Shepparton, Seymour and Wodonga, and at Community Correctional Services reporting locations in Myrtleford, Benalla, Cobram, Seymour, Mansfield and Corryong. The region has two minimum-security prisons, Dhurringile Prison and the Beechworth Correctional Centre.

Output performance
This section reports on the delivery of the department’s strategic priorities, including details of key projects, achievements and performance against costs and targets specified for the department in the 2013–14 Victorian Budget.

For budget purposes, outputs are defined as those goods and services provided to government by the department, its agencies and statutory bodies.

The department’s output reporting outlines the nature and purpose of each of the output groups and their contribution to justice policy objectives. The tables report actual performance against the budget estimates and targets for each output and key performance indicator.

Corresponding data for the two previous years are included, where available, for the purpose of comparison. The symbol ‘nm’ is used to indicate where a new measure has been introduced for which performance has not previously been reported. Where appropriate, commentary is provided on the factors influencing performance over the past three years.

A specific explanation is provided for significant variations between the 2013–14 targets and actuals, particularly where performance was five per cent more or less than the target. Explanation is also included where performance measures have changed.

Improving community safety through policing, law enforcement and prevention activities


  1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   ...   42


The database is protected by copyright ©essaydocs.org 2016
send message

    Main page