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1 Authors of this chapter are Steven Derene, Executive Director, National Association of VOCA Assistance Administrators, Madison, WI; Steve Walker, Ph.D., California State University, Fresno, CA; and John Stein, J.D., International Organization for Victim Assistance, Newberg, OR.

1 Authors of this chapter are Christine Edmunds, Deerfield Beach, FL; and Anne Seymour, Justice Solutions, Washington, DC. Special thanks is expressed to Dr. Mario T. Gaboury, University of New Haven, CT, for his significant input and editing of this chapter.

1 A. Seymour and D. Beatty, in press, Judicial Education Project Curriculum, Washington, DC: Justice Solutions et al., and Office for Victims of Crime, U.S. Department of Justice..

1 Ibid.

1 Ibid.

1 Substantial portions of this content was provided by Meg Garvin, Executive Director of the National Crime Victim Law Institute (NCVLI), a nonprofit organization located at Lewis & Clark Law School in Portland, Oregon, a national organization dedicated to ensuring enforcement of victims’ rights in criminal courts nationwide.

1 Ibid.

1 The authors of this chapter are Christine N. Edmunds, Deerfield Beach, FL; Anne K. Seymour, Justice Solutions, Washington, DC; and Mario T. Gaboury, Ph.D., JD, University of New Haven, CT.

1 The authors of this chapter are Nancy Lewis, Colorado Organization for Victim Assistance, Denver, CO; and Ann Jaramillo, Introspect Consulting, Evergreen, CO.

1 Tenn. Code Ann. § 39-15-401(a).

2 State v. Mateyko, 53 S.W.3d 666, 2001 Tenn. Lexis 625 (Tenn. 2001).

1 Tenn. Code Ann. § 39-12-101.

2 Tenn. Code Ann. § 39-15-402(a).

3 Tenn. Code Ann. § 39-15-402(b).

4 Tenn. Code Ann. § 39-15-402(c).

5 Tenn. Code Ann. § 39-11-403(a).

1 Tenn. Code Ann. § 39-11-403(b).

2

3



4



1 Tenn. Code Ann. § 37-1-102(b)(2).

2 Tenn. Code Ann. § 37-1-102(b)(12).

1 Tenn. Code Ann. § 37-1-102(b)(21).

2 Tenn. Code Ann. §§ 37-1-113(a)(3); 37-1-114(a)(2).

1 Tenn. Code Ann. §; 37-1-114(a)(2).

2 Tenn. Code Ann. § 36-1-113(c).

3 Tenn. Code Ann. § 36-1-113 (g)(2).

4 Tenn. Code Ann. § 36-1-113 (g)(1).

1 Tenn. Code Ann. § 36-1-113(g)(3).

2 Tenn. Code Ann. § 36-1-113(g)(4).

3 Tenn. Code Ann. § 37-1-102(b)(21).

4 In Re S.M.C., 1999 Tenn. App. LEXIS 365 (Tenn. Ct. App. 1999).

1 Tenn. Code Ann. § 36-1-113(g)(5).

2



1



1



2



1 Authors of this chapter are Eidell Wasserman, Ph.D., Sebastopol, CA; and Carroll Ann Ellis, J.D.,
Fairfax County Police Department, Fairfax, VA

1
 Authors of this chapter are Eidell Wasserman, Ph.D., Sebastopol, CA; and Jeannette Adkins, National Organization for Victim Assistance (formerly), Alexandria, VA.

1

Authors of this chapter are Anne Seymour, Justice Solutions, Washington DC; Marti Anderson, Iowa Office of the Attorney General, Des Moines, IA; and Kevin Lowe, Ph.D., Sacramento, CA.

1

Gormley, W., and L. Spink, 2003, Working with Diversity in Collaboration: Tips and Tools. Nairobi, Kenya: The CGIAR Gender and Diversity Program.

1
 This chapter is largely excerpted or paraphrased from writings authored by Melissa Hook with funding provided by the U.S. Department of Justice, Office of Justice Programs, Office for Victims of Crime, under grant #95 MU-GX-K002. These materials were subsequently published in a text, Ethics in Victim Services, (Baltimore: Sidran Institute Press and Victims’ Assistance Legal Organization, 2005) and are used here by the Office for Victims of Crime with acknowledgment to the text’s publisher. For more information about the book, visit www.sidran.org/store. Discounts are available for NVAA participants. Contact orders@sidran.org for details.

2
 The authors of this chapter are Dana DeHart, Ph.D., University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC; and Melissa Hook, District of Columbia Office of Victim Services, Washington, DC.

1
 The author of this chapter is Brian Ogawa, D. Min., Washburn University, Topeka, KS.

1

The authors of this chapter are Janice Harris Lord, Arlington, TX; and Kevin O’Brien, Ph.D., National Center for Victims of Crime, Washington, DC.

1

F. Flach, 1990, “The Resilience Hypothesis and Posttraumatic Stress Disorder,” in Posttraumataic Stress Disorder: Etiology, Phenomenology, and Treatment, eds. M.E. Wolf and A.D. Mosnaim, Washington, DC: American Psychiatric Press, 36–45; S.J. Wolin, and S. Wolin, 1993, The Resilient Self: How Survivors of Troubled Families Rise Above Adversity, New York: Villard Books; J.C. Norcross, 2000, “Psychotherapist Self-Care: Practitioner-tested, Research-informed Strategies,” Professional Psychology: Research and Practice 31(6): 7028–7035; P.J. Waite and G.E. Richardson, 2004, “Determining the Efficacy of Resilience Training in the Work Site, “ Journal of Allied Health 33(3): 178–183.

2

P.A. Linley, 2003, “Positive Adaptation to Trauma: Wisdom as Both Process and Outcome,” Journal of Traumatic Stress 16(6): 601–610; P.A. Linley and S. Joseph, 2004, “Positive Change Following Trauma and Adversity: A Review,” Journal of Traumatic Stress 17(1): 11-21; P.J. Waite and G.E. Richardson, 2004, “Determining the Efficacy of Resilience Training in the Work Site, “ Journal of Allied Health 33(3): 178–183.

1

F. Flach, 1990, “The Resilience Hypothesis and Posttraumatic Stress Disorder,” in Posttraumataic Stress Disorder: Etiology, Phenomenology, and Treatment, eds. M.E. Wolf and A.D. Mosnaim, Washington, DC: American Psychiatric Press, 36–45; S.J. Wolin, and S. Wolin, 1993, The Resilient Self: How Survivors of Troubled Families Rise Above Adversity, New York: Villard Book; W. Trine, “How Can Young People’s Resilielce Be Enhanced? Experiences from a Clinical Intervention Project,” Clinical Child Psychology and Psychiatry 9(2): 167–183.

1
 P.A. Linley and S. Joseph, 2004, “Positive Change Following Trauma and Adversity: A Review,” Journal of Traumatic Stress 17(1): 11–21.

1
 M.M. Tugade, B.L. Frederickson, and L.F. Barrett, 2004, “Psychological Resilience and Positive Emotional Granularity: Examining the Benefits of Positive Emotions on Coping and Health,” Journal of Personality, 72(6): 1161–1190; M.M. Tugade and B.J. Frederickson, 2004, “Resilient Individuals Use Positive Emotions to Bounce Back from Negative Emotional Experiences,” Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 86(2): 320–333.

1
 F. Flach, 1990, “The Resilience Hypothesis and Posttraumatic Stress Disorder,” in Posttraumatic Stress Disorder: Etiology, Phenomenology, and Treatment, eds. M.E. Wolf and A.D. Mosnaim, Washington, DC: American Psychiatric Press, 36–45; S.J. Wolin and S. Wolin, 1993, The Resilient Self: How Survivors of Troubled Families Rise Above Adversity, New York: Villard Books.

2
 F. Flach, 1990, “The Resilience Hypothesis and Posttraumatic Stress Disorder,” in Posttraumatic Stress Disorder: Etiology, Phenomenology, and Treatment, eds. M.E. Wolf and A.D. Mosnaim, Washington, DC: American Psychiatric Press, 36–45; S.J. Wolin and S. Wolin, 1993, The Resilient Self: How Survivors of Troubled Families Rise Above Adversity, New York: Villard Books; J. Lanning, 1987, “Posttrauma Recovery of Public Safety Workers for the Delta 191 Crash: Debriefing, Personal Characteristics, and Social Systems,” unpublished manuscript; P.A. Linley and S. Joseph, 2004, “Positive Change Following Trauma and Adversity: A Review,” Journal of Traumatic Sterss 17(1): 11–21.




1
 P.A. Linley, 2003, “Positive Adaptation to Trauma; Wisdom as Both Process an Outcome,” Journal of Traumatic Stress 16(6): 601–610; (Linley, 2003; M.M. Tugade and B.L. Frederickson, 2004, “Resilient Individuals Use Positive Emotions to Bounce Back from Negative Emotional Experiences,” Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 86(2): 320–333.
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