John a casey Jr. PhD



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John A Casey Jr. PhD
Lecturer

Department of English

University of Illinois at Chicago

601 South Morgan Street (MC 162)

Room 2027 University Hall

Chicago, IL 60607-7120

312-208-9536

312-413-1005 (fax)

jcasey3@uic.edu
EDUCATION:

Ph.D. Literature. University of Illinois at Chicago. 2010.

MA. Literature. University of Illinois at Chicago. 2002.

BA. English and Latin. University of Vermont. 2000.



PUBLICATIONS:

Books
New Men: Reconstructing the Concept of the Veteran in Late Nineteenth-Century American Literature and Culture. Fordham University Press. [Forthcoming April 2015.]
Articles
“Marked By War—Demobilization, Disability, and the Trope of the Citizen-Soldier in Miss Ravenel’s Conversion from Secession to Loyalty.” Civil War History. 60.2 (June 2014): 123-51. Print.
“Veterans.” Civil War America: A Social and Cultural History With Primary Sources. Ed. Zoe Trodd and Maggi Morehouse. New York: Routledge Press, 2012. 284-292. Print.
“Searching for a War of One’s Own—Stephen Crane, The Red Badge of Courage, and the Glorious Burden of the Civil War Veteran.” American Literary Realism. 44.1 (Fall 2011): 1-22. Print.

Book Reviews and Review Essays

“The Superiority of Experience: A Review Essay of Paul Sorrentino’s Stephen Crane: A Life of Fire.” Resources for American Literary Study. 38. [Forthcoming 2015.]



Encyclopedia Entries

“Art and Warfare.” Weapons and Warfare. Volume 3. Ed. John Powell. Pasadena, CA: Salem Press, 2010. 851-855. Print.

“Commemoration of War.” Weapons and Warfare. Volume 3. Ed. John Powell. Pasadena, CA: Salem Press, 2010. 856-860. Print.

“Carpetbaggers.” Encyclopedia of African American History. Ed. Walter C. Rucker and Leslie Alexander. Santa Barbara, CA: ABC-CLIO, 2010. 335. Print.



AWARDS AND FELLOWSHIPS:

Faculty Summer Institute Mini Grant. Academic Computing and Communications Center. University of Illinois at Chicago. 2012.

($500.00 to apply technological methods and tools to classroom instruction.)

Upton Foundation Fellowship on Civil War America. William L. Clements Library. University of Michigan. Ann Arbor, MI. 2011.

(Two month residential fellowship--$8,000.)

Filson Fellowship. Filson Historical Society. Louisville, Kentucky. 2011.

(One week residential fellowship--$500.00.)

Graduate Merit Award. Liberal Arts and Sciences Alumni Association. University of Illinois at Chicago. 2008. ($500.00.)



BOOK MANUSCRIPT:

New Men uncovers a commonly overlooked aspect of the Civil War’s legacy—the reentry process of former soldiers into civilian life and the impact of that experience on future conceptions of what it meant to be a veteran. Scholars of the period have commonly assumed that veterans of the Union and Confederate armies effortlessly melted back into the general populace with little or no difficulty adjusting to the demands of peacetime society. Yet the path these soldiers followed on the road to reintegration was far more tangled, filled with misgivings about their postwar social status and the misunderstanding of civilians who struggled to comprehend what former soldiers had experienced. In the early years following the war, the concept of the “veteran” functioned as a marker for what was assumed by soldiers and civilians alike to be a temporary social status that ended definitively with army demobilization and the successful attainment of civilian employment. My research indicates that over time the term “veteran” evolved to connote a permanent identity. This new self-conception served two needs. The first was to explain the implicit sense of difference that may former Civil War soldiers felt from the general population. The second was to reinterpret the meaning of their service in light of the political and economic disappointments of the war’s aftermath. White men from the North and South, along with a significant segment of African-American males, came together over their participation in the Civil War. They were new men born of war and felt superior to the ordinariness of the postwar era.


PROFESSIONAL EXPERIENCE:

Assistant Director of First Year Writing August 2014- Department of English, University of Illinois at Chicago

Lecturer August 2012- Department of English, University of Illinois at Chicago

Assistant Director of Undergraduate Studies August 2012-May 2014. Department of English, University of Illinois at Chicago

Visiting Lecturer August 2010-May 2012 Department of English, University of Illinois at Chicago

Adjunct Faculty August 2008-December 2011 Department of English and First Year Seminar, Columbia College Chicago

Visiting Lecturer. August 2008-December 2008 Department of English, University of Illinois at Chicago

Instructor and Teaching Assistant August 2000-May 2008 Department of English, University of Illinois at Chicago

Research Assistant May 2001-May 2002 Department of English, University of Illinois at Chicago

COURSES TAUGHT:

University of Illinois at Chicago-



  • Survey of American Literature from the Colonial Period to 1914.

  • Introduction to Literary Criticism and Critical Theory.

  • Introduction to Literature (with a focus on literary genres).

  • Introduction to British and American Prose Fiction (with a focus on the genre of Detective fiction).

  • Introduction to American Literature and Culture (with a focus on the literary genre of the Western and the concept of the American Frontier).

  • First Year Writing I and II. In the first half of the course, students examine the concept of genre, writing in a wide variety of forms, including the traditional college essay. The second half of the course uses Chicago history and urban planning and design as topics to help aid students in learning research skills (primary and secondary research) with the ultimate goal being a college level research paper.

Columbia College Chicago-

  • Writing and Rhetoric I. (Introduction to the college essay through the examination of exemplary models.)

  • Writing and Rhetoric II. (Introduction to college level research and writing with an emphasis on ethnographic research methods. Students conduct field research on a topic related to either Chicago history or urban planning and design.)

  • First Year Seminar. (An inter-disciplinary Great Ideas course that asks students to engage such issues as ethics and community using a wide variety of creative media including film, dance, sculpture, music, writing, and photography.)

Ph.D. EXAM FIELDS:

  • Nineteenth-Century American Literature, 1820-1905.

  • British Romanticism, 1796-1825.

  • Literature of the American South, 1920-1970.

  • Historical Approaches to Literature: Theory and Practice.


CONFERENCES:
Papers Presented:
Depicting Gettysburg in Evelyn Scott’s The Wave.” Northeast Modern Language Association (NEMLA). Harrisburg, PA. April 3-6, 2014.
Narrating Trauma in the Writings of Sam Watkins and Ambrose Bierce.” Northeast Modern Language Association (NEMLA). Boston, MA. March 21-24, 2013.
Relics of War—The Image of the Wounded Veteran in Post-Civil War America.” The Legacy of the Civil War: An Interdisciplinary Conference. Chesnutt Hill College. Philadelphia, PA. November 10-12, 2011.
The Return of the Natural Gentleman in John Esten Cooke’s Heir of Gaymount.” Virginia Forum. Lexington, VA. March 25-26, 2011.
The Post-Traumatic Flashback as a Mode of Narration in Ambrose Bierce’s ‘A Resumed Identity.” Popular Culture and American Culture Association National Conference. St. Louis, MO. April 2010.
Combating Illness in Miss Ravenel’s Conversion from Secession to Loyalty.” Popular Culture and American Culture Association National Conference. New Orleans, LA. April 2009.
The Violent Core of Masculinity: Militarism and Manhood in Stephen Crane’s The Red Badge of Courage and ‘The Veteran.’” Popular Culture and American Culture Association National Conference. San Francisco, CA. March 2008.
Reading Huckleberry Finn as a Sentimental Novel.” Reception Studies Society Conference. Kansas City, MO. September 2007.

Miss Ravenel’s Conversion: The Limits and Possibilities of the Historical Romance in 19th Century American Fiction.” Southwest Popular Culture and American Culture Association Regional Conference. San Antonio, TX. April 2004.



Poster Sessions:
Teaching Writing in Engineering—Description of the project and its results. January 2002. Sponsored by the Center for the Study of Learning, Instruction, and Teacher Development (LITD) at the University of Illinois at Chicago.
Conferences Attended:
Faculty Summer Institute. Champaign-Urbana, IL. May 14-16, 2012. A three day series of seminars and workshops on the effective use of teaching with technology.


PROFESSIONAL SERVICE:
Service to the Discipline:
Book reviewer for Resources for American Literary Study. 2014.
Conference Panel Chair. “High Water Mark of the Civil War: The Battle of Gettysburg in Fiction and Film.” Northeast Modern Language Association Conference. Harrisburg, PA. April 3-6, 2014.
Conference Panel Chair. “The Civil War in American Culture.” The Legacy of the Civil War: An Interdisciplinary Conference. Chesnutt Hill College. Philadelphia, PA. November 2011.
Referee for the journal Feminist Studies. 2011-the present.
Conference Panel Chair. “Disability and the Civil War.” Popular Culture and American Culture Association National Conference. New Orleans, LA. April 2009.

Departmental and University Service:
Assistant Director of Undergraduate Studies—
Originally, this position was called “English Advisor” and focused primarily on undergraduate advising as well as career counseling. Under my guidance, this position shifted to include a broad range of initiatives to recruit and retain English Majors at UIC. These included:


  • Creating and maintaining a Facebook page https://www.facebook.com/EnglishUndergraduateStudiesatUIC.

  • Establishing a learning commons for the gateway course for new English majors

(English 240) http://uic240sharedworkspace.wordpress.com/

  • Working with department faculty to create a new course in Proofreading and Copyediting

  • Setting up focus groups to learn what extracurricular events English majors would be interested in attending

  • Reviewing existing enrollment data for trends in student areas of study

  • Meeting with faculty in other departments to discuss course cross-listing initiatives to encourage growth in English minors and double-majors

  • Contacting alumni to help build a network for English majors nearing graduation and provide information on the current careers held by UIC English graduates.

  • Organizing a committee to examine procedures for evaluation of Lecturers and Teaching Assistants in general education English courses.

  • Streamlining course description submission process

  • Rewriting department course evaluation form

  • Assisting the Dean’s office in First Year Student outreach efforts to potential English majors.


In addition to these duties I continued many of the activities assigned to the original English Advisor’s position such as:


  • Forwarding information about available courses to English majors via email listserv

  • Processing paperwork for Senior Thesis and Independent Study Projects

  • Uploading faculty syllabi to the Undergraduate Studies Blackboard site

  • Advising English majors in course selection and progress to degree

  • Meeting with English majors for career counseling

  • Managing the application process for Undergraduate English Awards

  • Setting up and chairing the Senior Thesis presentation day event

  • Organizing the Graduate School Workshop

  • Certifying English degrees


Assistant Director of First Year Writing—
Duties for this job include both instructional support for faculty teaching first year writing and program support to address issues relating to student enrollment and the program’s relationship to the department, college, and university.


Instructional support duties include:



  • Collecting and distributing sample syllabi, lists of approved books, and other course related materials to faculty

  • Reviewing faculty syllabi to ensure that new instructors are prepared to teach the course and that existing classes meet program standards

  • Planning and facilitating conferences and workshops on teaching methods for first year writing courses

  • Observe program faculty and write observation letters

  • Coordinate portfolio review process for developmental writing courses and the first of the two required writing classes

  • Update and maintain First Year Writing Program Blackboard site and Message Board.

  • Support users of MyLab grammar software


Program Support:


  • Assist students with registration related issues

  • Mediate conflicts between students and faculty

  • Review suspected cases of plagiarism and advise on potential courses of action

  • Develop placement test materials

  • Evaluate writing portfolios of transfer students to determine eligiblility for first year writing requirement waivers

  • Serve as liaison between the program and existing campus resources such as the Student Success Center

  • Coordinate campus initiatives as they relate to first year writing


OTHER PROJECTS:
I maintain a professional blog on matters relating to Civil War literature and culture as well as teaching practices at http://johnacaseyjr.com/. This site also serves as a venue to display my current research and teaching materials. You can also follow my Tweets on current research and teaching interests @JohnACaseyJr.
Assisted Professor Ann Feldman (Director of the UIC First Year Writing Program) in a summer institute (2001) designed to train graduate student teaching assistants in the UIC Mechanical Engineering department effective methods of teaching and evaluating student lab reports. I conducted a research study to follow up on this summer institute, observing the implementation of these techniques in two Mechanical Engineering courses. The results from this study were presented at a poster session in 2002 that was sponsored by the UIC Center for the Study of Learning, Instruction, and Teacher Development.

FOREIGN LANGUAGE ABILITIES/SKILLS:

I have reading knowledge in ancient Greek, French, and Spanish, and fluency in Latin.



PROFESSIONAL AFFILIATIONS:

The American Literature Association (ALA) The American Studies Association (ASA) C19: The Society of Nineteenth-Century Americanists (C19) The Modern Language Association (MLA) National Council for College Teachers of English (NCTE) The Northeast Modern Language Association (NEMLA) The Reception Studies Society (RSS) The Society of Civil War Historians (SCWH) Stephen Crane Society I also belong to several honor societies, among them Phi Beta Kappa and Eta Sigma Phi.



REFERENCES:

Judith Kegan Gardiner: Professor Emeritus, Department of English and Gender and Women’s Studies Program (MC 162), 2027 University Hall, 601 South Morgan Street, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL 60607-7120. (312) 413-9138. gardiner@uic.edu

Robin Sandra Grey: Associate Professor, Department of English (MC 162), 2027 University Hall, 601 South Morgan Street, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL 60607-7120. (312) 413-2902. rgrey@uic.edu

Christopher Grimes: Director of Undergraduate Studies and Associate Professor, Department of English (MC 162), 2027 University Hall, 601 South Morgan Street, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL 60607-7120. (312) 413-2253. cgrimes@uic.edu

Christian Messenger: Professor Emeritus, Department of English (MC 162), 2027 University Hall, 601 South Morgan Street, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL 60607-7120. (312) 413-2227. chrism1@uic.edu

Andrew Slap: Associate Professor, Department of History, 119 Rogers-Stout Hall , P.O. Box 70672, East Tennessee State University, Johnson City, TN 37614. (423) 439-6801. slap@etsu.edu




Casey



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