It is a shame that when I walk into Gasson 100 and look at the wall, there are about 12 white faces staring back at my black face. It is a shame that upon completion my fours years I will have only had 3 Black professors



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It is a shame that when I walk into Gasson 100 and look at the wall, there are about 12 white faces staring back at my black face. It is a shame that upon completion my fours years I will have only had 3 Black professors. It is a shame those 3 rank a high amount because many have had any not one black professor. It is a shame that of the many buildings at this school, there is only one office named after a person of color- how can a university claim to be diverse and celebrate it when students of color cannot find any buildings named after people who represent them? It is a shame that courses like African American history do not count towards any core, when it is a fundamental piece of American history and culture. It is a shame that dialogues about race do not extend for the most part outside of AADS classes. It is a shame that race has been pushed to private conversations and spaces and not publicly in class or school media, as if we do not live in a highly racialized society. By creating private spaces to speak of race, it not only makes those of us who are most affected by it feel uncomfortable to do it in a public sphere, when we do, we are then portrayed as 'focusing on race too much' or being too emotional in a race discussion like it is not our lives we are talking about. It is a shame that there is an increasing elimination of AHANA and its initial impact. In attempt to "integrate" us into a community from which we feel excluded, only the majority feels included in what we claim as ours, while we remain at the sidelines confused. By trying to mend us into one student body, we are further excluded because we have never felt included in the first place. In addition, we are still gaining a sense of who we are as an AHANA community at a predominantly white institution. Steve Biko, the South African father of black consciousness once said, "At the heart of true integration is the provision for each man, each group to rise and attain the envisioned self. Each group must be able to attain its style of existence without encroaching on or being thwarted by another. Out of this mutual respect for each other and complete freedom of self-determination there will obviously arise a genuine fusion of the lifestyles of the various groups. This is true integration." This has not yet happened at BC. BC has romanticized the meaning of diversity and has therefore lost it before it was even gained- no; one black friend is not enough. If you think we are separated now, it is because we have been force into something we as a whole BC community weren’t ready for. As men and women for others, we need to take care of our own backyard before we go abroad trying to understand the issues of others. Until true integration is formed, we students of color will continue to fight for and proclaim our presence on campus, socially and academically. We will no longer stand at the touchlines simply visible. We will continue to demand that we are properly reflected in all aspects of this institution, a reflection that empowers us to be proud BC eagles. We will demand and make noise until we have revolutionized this campus and true integration is met.


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