International Students The Vice-Chancellor’s Welcome



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In the future

Employment opportunities are diverse and include the resources industries (minerals, petroleum and groundwater), government agencies dealing with resources or environmental companies and agencies.

Students studying Geology are encouraged to undertake further studies at honours or postgraduate level. A master’s degree can be studied either by coursework (available specialisations include Hydrogeology and Ore Deposit Geology), or by research in a broad range of geoscience topics, usually in collaboration with industry or government agencies. Graduates may also consider other postgraduate options including degrees leading to the professional qualifications listed on pages 179 – 198.

Additional information

www.handbooks.uwa.edu.au/geology

Unit sequence

Level 1 core units

The Dynamic Planet

Introduction to Geology

Level 2 core units

Earth Materials

Earth Processes

Level 3 core units

Structural Geology and Tectonics

Geochemistry and Petrology

Geological Mapping

Basin Analysis

Complementary units

Students nominating Geology as their degree-specific major in the Bachelor of Science or Bachelor of Philosophy (Honours) course must also study:

Science, Society and Communication (unless Science Communication is taken as a second major)

Science, Society and Data Analysis

Environmental Hydrology

Field Geology

German Studies
www.studyat.uwa.edu.au/german
Requirements

Prerequisites: None

Academic and English language requirements: See pages 202 – 203

German Studies is the study of the German language and its various cultures. This major offers a wide perspective on German society as it considers the culture and history of German-speaking people across the globe. Social history and culture are studied from the many centuries of German literary tradition—prose, poetry, drama, music, film and advertising. UWA offers this major from beginners through to near-native speakers.



In the future

Graduates are well qualified for careers in the diplomatic services, teaching and training, interpreting and translating, as well as a range of careers in travel, hospitality, publishing, theatre, commerce, manufacturing, law and international relations. Knowledge of a foreign language is particularly helpful for career prospects in international banking, journalism and communications, medical areas, music and the arts.



Students can choose to pursue further studies at honours level or undertake a master’s degree such as the Master of Translation Studies or other degrees leading to the professional on pages 179 – 198.

Additional information

www.handbooks.uwa.edu.au/german

51Unit Sequence

Beginners

Pre-Intermediate

Intermediate

Advanced

LEVEL 1

German Studies 1

German Studies 3B

German Studies 3

German Studies 5

German Studies 2

German Studies 3

German Studies 4

German Studies 6

LEVEL 2

German Studies 3

German Studies 4

German Studies 5

German Studies 7 and 8; or

German Studies 4

German Studies 5

German Studies 6

German Studies 9 and 10; and

German Studies 3B

German Studies 6

German Studies 12

German Studies 12

LEVEL 3

German Studies 5

German Studies 7 and 8; or

German Studies 7 and 8; or

German Studies 7 and 8; or

German Studies 6

German Studies 9 and 10; and

German Studies 9 and 10; and

German Studies 9 and 10; and

German Studies 13

German Studies 13

German Studies 13

German Studies 13

STUDY ABROAD

Exchange to Aachen, Berlin, Freiburg or Tübingen

This may be substituted for four Level 2 or Level 3 units (24 points).



Stuttgart program

This may be substituted for two Level 2 or Level 3 units (12 points) during the summer break following Semester 2.




History

www.studyat.uwa.edu.au/history

Requirements

Prerequisites: None

Academic and English language requirements: See pages 202 – 203

Studying History introduces you to the way we create the collective memory of the human race. This is not as easy as it sounds, as our memory can play tricks. Sorting out the facts from fiction requires careful sifting of evidence when investigating the deep causes of events such as the American Revolution, the First World War, the fall of Communism or the colonisation of Australia. History introduces you to the complexities involved in these exciting pursuits and requires you to use imagination as well as reason. It requires you to judge historical interpretations and to pit your own interpretation against those reached by other students. History will challenge you through lots of arguments, shared discoveries and fun.



In the future

History graduates find careers in which they can use their skills in research, critical analysis and written communication such as historical research and writing, politics, teaching, journalism, librarianship and archival management, government agencies, museums, cultural heritage and tourism, business administration and publishing.



Additional information

www.handbooks.uwa.edu.au/history

Unit sequence

Level 1 core units

Old Worlds and New Empires

The Modern World

Level 2 core unit and option

Thinking History



Plus one of the following:

Medieval and Early Modern Women

Restaging the Past: Cinema and the Practice of History

The Rise and Fall of European Fascism

Hitler, the Holocaust and the Historians

From ‘Glorious Revolution’ to Industrial Revolution: Making Britain 1688–1888

White Supremacy

Revolutionary China

Australia in the Sixties

Europe: Crusades to Black Death

Imperial America 1845 to Present

Renaissance, Reformation, Revolt: Europe 1450–1650

Crises and Controversies in Australian History

Level 3 core unit and options

Making History



Plus three of the following:

Introduction to African History

Twentieth-century African-American History

Twentieth-century Britain

Contested Pasts, Contentious Futures

Crime and Punishment in Britain 1600–1900

Western Australian History and Heritage

From Sudan to Saddam: Australia’s Foreign Wars

History in Fantasy, Fantasy in History

Russia and the Soviet Union in the Twentieth Century

The Vikings

Early Modern France 1500–1789



Complementary unit

Students nominating History as their degree-specific major in the Bachelor of Arts or Bachelor of Philosophy (Honours) course must also study:

Communication in Practice



History of Art

www.studyat.uwa.edu.au/art-history
Requirements

Prerequisites: None

Academic and English language requirements: See pages 202 – 203

The History of Art major introduces you to art within the whole spectrum of the visual experience. It covers key moments in the development of a number of disciplines such as audio-visual arts, literature, film and new media, architecture, landscape architecture and the impact of other art and design practice on the history of cultures. Learning to experience aesthetic pleasure through emotional intuition and intellectual learning


is an essential means of exploring the serious issues of past and present cultures.

In the future

A major in History of Art equips you for a wide range of careers including professions in art education, museums and tourism industries; advertising; visual content management; film and television production; as well as professions such as art practitioners, curators, conservators and administrators in private and public galleries. In combination with other qualifications there are also recognised openings for History of Art graduates in art investment, art law, law enforcement, libraries, corporate business organisations (including visual resource companies and international auction houses) and government agencies (such as public art schemes and heritage management), the publishing industry and the antiquarian book trade.

Students can choose to pursue further study at honours level, progressing to a PhD or the professionally recognised Master of Curatorial Studies in Fine Arts. This major also lays the foundation for further study in a broad range of topics nationally and internationally.

Additional information

www.handbooks.uwa.edu.au/arthistory

Unit sequence

LEvel 1 core units

Great Moments in Art

Art, Technology and Society

LEVEL 2 options (select one)

Art of the Counter Reformation

The Big Picture: Recurring Themes in Western Art and Architecture

Contemporary Art

Modernism and the Visual Arts

Plus one of the following:

Film Noir to the New Wave

Imagist Avant-Garde Film

The Body in Art

Aboriginal Contemporary Art

Level 3 options (select one)

Art Theory

Painting into Film: the Reversed Canvas from Velazquez to Antonioni

Plus three of the following:

Australian Art

Art and Games: from Dada to Data

Art of the Reformation

Materialist Avant-Garde Film

Art and Pop

Twenty-first-century Art

Cubism and its Diasporas

The Grand Tour: Visual and Verbal Contrasts from the Age of Enlightenment to the Era of Mass Tourism

Human Geography and Planning

www.studyat.uwa.edu.au/human-geog-planning

Requirements

Prerequisites: None

Academic and English language requirements: See pages 202 – 203

Human Geography and Planning involves understanding and guiding the development of cities and regions. It focuses on some of the major challenges currently facing society including the population explosion, rapid urbanisation, poverty and homelessness, land use conflict, cultural diversity, economic development and ecological sustainability. As a student you will develop the knowledge and skills to help resolve major urban and regional problems and ultimately have the ability to contribute to the creation of liveable communities, vibrant economies and sustainable places. The major includes local field work trips and an opportunity to participate in overseas residential field work in a variety of Southeast Asian destinations.52



In the future

Planners and geographers are employed by local and state governments and in the private sector in areas including regional development, public administration, public policy, social research, teaching and land development.

Students can choose to pursue further studies at honours or postgraduate level in either Urban and Regional Planning or Geography. A master’s degree can be studied by coursework (Master of Urban and Regional Planning) or research. Students with honours in Urban and Regional Planning will be eligible to apply for professional membership of the Planning Institute of Australia.

Additional information

www.handbooks.uwa.edu.au/humangeogplanning
Unit sequence

Level 1 core units

Geographies of Global Cities

Globalisation, Environment and Development

Level 2 core units

Geographies of Economic Development

Social Geography and Planning

Level 3 core units

Geographical and Planning Methods

Urban Design for Planners

Regional Development and Planning

Geographical and Planning Field Studies

Complementary units

Students nominating Human Geography and Planning as their degree-specific major in the Bachelor of Arts or Bachelor of Philosophy (Honours) course must also study:

Communication in Practice

Geographic Information Systems

Environmental Policy and Planning



Human Resource Management

www.studyat.uwa.edu.au/human-resource-mgmt

Requirements

Prerequisites: Mathematics53

Academic and English language requirements: See pages 202 – 203

Human Resource Management explores how proper, effective management of employees contributes towards organisational efficiency. This major provides you with thorough theoretical and practical grounding in the management of people and employment in Australia and overseas. You will complete study in areas including organisational behaviour, employment relations systems and processes, human resource planning, recruitment and selection, performance management, training and development, occupational health and safety, work organisation, negotiation and conflict resolution, giving you valuable skills as an employee in any given industry.



In the future

This major complements other studies and careers in management and prepares you for a career in human resources in both the public sector and private organisations.

Students can choose to pursue study at honours level or undertake a master’s degree such as the Master of Human Resources and Employment Relations, Master of Commerce or Master of Business Administration (after managerial work experience). They may also consider other postgraduate options including degrees leading to the professional qualifications listed on pages 179 – 198.

Additional information

www.handbooks.uwa.edu.au/humanresourcemgmt
Unit sequence

Level 1 core units

Management and Organisations

Organisational Behaviour

Level 2 core units

Australian Employment Relations

Human Resource Management

Level 3 core units

International Employment Relations

Managing Jobs, Performance and Wellbeing

Negotiation: Theory and Practice

Staffing Organisations

Complementary units

Students nominating Human Resource Management as their degree-specific major in the Bachelor of Commerce or Bachelor of Philosophy (Honours) course must also study:

Economic and Business Statistics

Financial Accounting

Marketing Management

Microeconomics: Prices and Markets

Indigenous Knowledge, History and Heritage

www.studyat.uwa.edu.au/indigenous-knowledge

Requirements

Prerequisites: None

Academic and English language requirements: See pages 202 – 203

The Indigenous Knowledge, History and Heritage major comprises an interdisciplinary program that will provide you with an opportunity to learn about the history, culture and philosophy of Aboriginal peoples in Australia. The units offered enable you to critically engage with the issues covered, across a number of disciplines, and connect to contemporary Australian social issues. Studying the major will give you a strong grounding in Aboriginal knowledge systems as well as Western disciplinary constructs around Indigenous knowledge and peoples. Graduates gain a broad understanding and knowledge of Aboriginal people, and their ability to work appropriately and effectively with Indigenous peoples is enhanced. They increase their ability to work in culturally competent ways and develop flexible, generic and portable skills essential to a changing global environment.



In the future

The broad skills base and adaptable approach of graduates from the major are valuable in areas such as legal and human rights organisations, government departments, business and industry, education, trade and tourism, health and the environment.

Students may choose to pursue further studies at honours or postgraduate level.

Additional information

www.handbooks.uwa.edu.au/indigenousknowledge

Unit sequence

Level 1 core units

Aboriginal Encounters: Strangers in Our Backyard

Knowing Country: The Dreaming and Darwin

Level 2 core units

Indigenous Knowledge: Mind, Body and Spirit

Looking South: Noongar Voices

Looking North: Wild West



Level 3 core units

Indigenous Research

Indigenous Peoples and the World

Image, Representation and Appropriation



Complementary unit

Students nominating Indigenous Knowledge, History and Heritage as their degree-specific major in the Bachelor of Arts or Bachelor of Philosophy (honours) course must also study:

Communication in Practice



Indonesian

www.studyat.uwa.edu.au/indonesian

Requirements

Prerequisites: None

Academic and English language requirements: See pages 202 – 203

A major in Indonesian enables you to achieve a high level of fluency in the language of Australia’s closest neighbour and the world’s fourth largest country. Indonesian is a relatively easy language to learn and as a result, it is a popular choice for beginners but is also available for students who have studied to high school level or equivalent. As well as learning how to speak, read and write Indonesian, you will be enriched through exposure to this fascinating and dynamic culture. As a student, you will have the exciting opportunity to spend a semester studying at an Indonesian university.



In the future

Knowledge of Indonesian language, culture and social norms is in demand by state and federal government departments as well as commercial enterprises investing in Indonesia; the media, education, tourism and hospitality industries. Graduates are also well equipped to travel around Indonesia and explore its rich cultures and beautiful natural environment.

Students can choose to pursue further studies at honours level or other postgraduate options including degrees leading to professional qualifications listed on pages 179 – 198.

Additional information

www.handbooks.uwa.edu.au/indonesian

54Unit Sequence

Beginners

Pre-Intermediate

Intermediate

LEVEL 1

Indonesian 1

Indonesian 3A

Indonesian 3

Indonesian 2

Indonesian 3

Indonesian 4

LEVEL 2

Indonesian 3A

Indonesian 4

Indonesian 5

Indonesian 3

Indonesian 5

Indonesian 6

55Indonesian 4

Indonesian 6

Plus one of the units listed below

LEVEL 3

Indonesian 5

Indonesian 7

Indonesian 7

Indonesian 6

Indonesian 8

Indonesian 8

Indonesian Politics and Culture

Indonesian Politics and Culture

Indonesian Politics and Culture

COMPLEMENTARY UNIT

Students nominating Indonesian as their degree-specific major in the Bachelor of Arts or Bachelor of Philosophy (Honours) course must also study:

Communication in Practice




STUDY ABROAD

Indonesian Field Study (equivalent to two Indonesian language units)

Provides intensive language study at an Indonesian university over six to eight weeks during summer break.



Indonesian In-country (equivalent to four Indonesian language units)

This is a full-time semester of study in Indonesia. It may be substituted for any four units (24 points) of the Indonesian major after completing Indonesian 3 or equivalent (for Beginners) or Indonesian 4 or equivalent (for Pre-Intermediate and Intermediate).



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