International Students The Vice-Chancellor’s Welcome



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Students nominating Architecture as their degree-specific major in the Bachelor of Design or Bachelor of Philosophy (Honours) course must also study:

Drawing History

Structures and Natural Systems

Materials and Small Constructions

History: Modern Art and Architecture
Asian Studies

www.studyat.uwa.edu.au/asian-studies

Requirements

Prerequisites: None

Academic and English language requirements: See pages 202 – 203

Asia is home to two-thirds of the world’s population and some of the most dynamic and fascinating societies on the planet. It is also an economic powerhouse vital to Australia’s future prosperity and security. But what do we really know about the region in which we live?

Asian Studies introduces you to the many cultures, societies and politics of Asia including China, Indonesia, Japan and Korea. It explores the impact of the great religions such as Buddhism, Hinduism and Islam and investigates the dramatic changes that colonialism and revolutions have brought to the people of the region. As a student you will develop critical knowledge of contemporary Asia and the social, cultural, political and economic forces which are shaping modern societies in the region.

You will examine topics as diverse as popular culture, gender relations, environmental issues, political transformations, the media and Australia’s relations with the region. The Asian Studies major can be taken with other studies in Asian languages but the major itself does not involve a language component.



In the future

Graduates have excellent employment prospects in Australia and in the rising economies of Asia. Many employers in Australia and Asia give priority to the employment of graduates with an Asia-related academic background including human rights organisations, the Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade, the World Bank, the United Nations as well as in education, tourism and media.

Students can choose to pursue further studies at honours level or other postgraduate options including degrees leading to professional qualifications listed on pages 179 – 198.

Additional information

www.handbooks.uwa.edu.au/asianstudies

Unit sequence

Level 1 core units

Exploring Asian Identities

Creating Asian Modernities

Level 2 options (select two)

Culture, Society and the State in Asia

Australia and Asia

Popular Culture in Asia

Environment, Power and Disasters in Asia

Level 3 options (select four)

Indonesian Politics and Culture

Social Issues in Contemporary China

Issues in Japanese Society and Culture

Democratisation in Asia

Gender and Power in Asia



Complementary unit

Students nominating Asian Studies as their degree-specific major in the Bachelor of Arts or Bachelor of Philosophy (Honours) must also study:

Communication in Practice



Biochemistry and Molecular Biology

www.studyat.uwa.edu.au/biochemistry

Requirements

Prerequisites21:



  • March intake: Mathematics (Recommended subjects: Chemistry)

  • July intake: Mathematics, Chemistry, Biology

Academic and English language requirements: See pages 202 – 203

What are genes? How do hormones work? What goes wrong in a cancer cell? If these questions are of interest, then a major in Biochemistry and Molecular Biology may be for you. Biochemists and molecular biologists are interested in the molecular functions of all living organisms, from the smallest bacterium to the largest whale. In this major, you will study the way molecules are organised and how they interact to achieve the functions of the living cell and that of the organism. Your investigations will cover three main areas: the information stored in DNA; molecular interactions; and how organisms gain and use energy.



In the future

Graduates may find a career in a range of areas including research institutes, universities, hospitals, the health care industry, pharmaceutical industry, general and scientific sales, the food manufacturing industry, government and advisory services, biotechnology industry, teaching in schools and universities as well as diagnostic services in medicine and agriculture.

Students can choose to pursue further studies at honours and postgraduate level. Options include a Graduate Diploma in Science, Master of Food Science, Master of Infectious Diseases, Master of Pharmacy, and Master of Science Communication, as well as degrees leading to postgraduate qualifications on pages 179 – 198.

Additional information

www.handbooks.uwa.edu.au/biochemistry

Unit sequence

Level 1 core unit and option

Molecular Biology of the Cell

Plus one of the following:

Biological Chemistry

Chemistry—Structure and Reactivity

Level 2 core units

Biochemistry and Molecular Biology of the Cell

Biochemical Regulation of Cell Function

Level 3 core units

Structural and Functional Biochemistry

Cellular Biochemistry

Omics—Global Approaches to Cell Function

Molecular Biology

Complementary units

Students nominating Biochemistry and Molecular Biology as their degree-specific major in the Bachelor of Science or Bachelor of Philosophy (Honours) course must also study:

Statistics for Science

Chemistry—Properties and Energetics

Introductory Chemistry (for students who do not have the appropriate background in Chemistry)



Biomedical Science Double major22

www.studyat.uwa.edu.au/biomedical

Requirements

Prerequisites:



  • March intake: Mathematics (Recommended subjects: Chemistry)

  • July intake: Mathematics, Chemistry, Biology

Academic and English language requirements: See pages 202 – 203

Are you interested in finding out how diseases can be controlled, cured or prevented? Studying Biomedical Science will enable you to understand how the human body functions in health and disease which is essential for the development of new treatments. You will gain knowledge in anatomy and human biology, physiology, biochemistry and molecular biology, pathology, pharmacology, microbiology and immunology. To study the biomedical sciences you must take a double major. The first component provides a broad perspective of the field. You select the second component depending on your chosen area of specialisation (see pages 57 to 59). This will give you an understanding of the anatomy and physiology of the human body, the microbes that cause disease and the molecular and pathological processes of disease and how these diseases are treated.



In the future

As a Biomedical Science graduate, you will find careers in medical technology, research science or medical sales, as well as technical careers in hospital laboratories, universities and research institutes. In addition, you can pursue a research career in a biomedical field or in health services policy development and management.

Students can choose to pursue further studies at honours or postgraduate level, including a Graduate Diploma in Sleep Science, Master of Infectious Diseases, Master of Public Health, Master of Health Professional Education, Master of Forensic Science, Master of Laboratory Medicine, Master of Science Communication, or Master of Science Communication and Education, and the degrees leading to the professional qualifications listed on pages 179 – 198.

Studying Biomedical Science does not guarantee a place in postgraduate Dentistry or Medicine at UWA.



Additional information

www.handbooks.uwa.edu.au/biomedical

Unit sequence

Level 1 core unit and option

Molecular Biology of the Cell

Plus one of the following:

Human Biology I: Becoming Human

Human Biology II: Being Human

Level 2 core units

Biochemistry and Molecular Biology of the Cell

Foundations of Pharmacology

Human Structure and Development

Introduction to Infectious Diseases and Immunology

Level 3 core units and options

After finishing second year, you will then choose one of these six biomedical fields to study in greater depth in third year as your specialist discipline.


Anatomy and Human Biology/Physiology

Pathogens

The Host

Drugs and Disease A

Drugs and Disease B

Plus the following core units for Physiology:

Physiology of Membranes, Muscles and Signalling

Physiology of Cardiovascular and Respiratory Systems

Physiology of Nutrition and Metabolism

Physiology of Integrated Organ Function

OR three of the following options for Anatomy and Human Biology:

Biological Anthropology: Genes and Society

Cells, Tissues and Development

Human Structure and Function

Human Evolutionary Ecology

Human Reproduction



AND one of the following options for Anatomy and Human Biology:

Human Biology: Applications and Investigations I

Human Biology: Applications and Investigations II
Biochemistry and Molecular Biology/Microbiology and Immunology

Drugs and Disease A

Drugs and Disease B

Nature and Nurture I

Nature and Nurture II

Plus the following core units for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology:

Structural and Functional Biochemistry

Omics—Global Approaches to Cell Function

Cellular Biochemistry

Molecular Biology

OR the following core units for Microbiology and Immunology:

Applied and Environmental Microbiology

Viruses and Viral Disease

Immunology in Health and Disease

Bacteria and Bacterial Disease
Pathology and Laboratory Medicine/Pharmacology

Nature and Nurture I

Nature and Nurture II

Pathogens

The Host

Plus the following core units for Pathology and Laboratory Medicine:

Advanced Pathology and Laboratory Medicine

Integrated and Applied Pathology

AND two of the following options for Pathology and Laboratory Medicine:

Medical Genetics

Immunology and Immunopathology

Pathology: Human Oncobiology

Biotherapeutics and Regenerative Medicine

OR the following core units for Pharmacology:

Molecular Pharmacology

Molecular Pharmacology Methods

Systems Pharmacology

Systems Pharmacology Methods


Complementary units

Students completing a double major in Biomedical Science within the Bachelor of Science or Bachelor of Philosophy (Honours) course must also study:

Biological Chemistry (Chemistry is a prerequisite to studying this unit)

Introduction to Scientific Practices

Physiology of Human Body Systems

Introduction to Human Disease

Botany

www.studyat.uwa.edu.au/botany

Requirements

Prerequisites: Mathematics23

Academic and English language requirements: See pages 202 – 203

Botany is the scientific study of plants—from their structure and function to their integral roles in ecosystems as well as the intricacies of their cell function. Botanists also study how plants evolve and adapt to changing climates and environments and have a proactive role in understanding and conserving biodiversity. Botany is an ideal major if you are enthusiastic about our unique native flora or agricultural crops, and are interested in addressing current and future threats to plant conservation and sustainability. This major includes field work and extended field trips.24



In the future

Botany graduates are employed by private sector environmental consultants, the mining industry, government departments, botanic gardens and research agencies that either work in, or are interested in, the environment, conservation, restoration and horticulture.

Students can choose to pursue further studies at honours or postgraduate level. A master’s degree can be studied either by coursework (available specialisations include Plant Conservation Biology, Plant Production, or Environmental Management), or by research (thesis and coursework in, for example, Botany or Ecology and Evolution). Graduates may also be interested in other postgraduate coursework options including degrees leading to professional qualifications in fields such as teaching and law listed on pages 179 – 198.

Additional information

www.handbooks.uwa.edu.au/botany
Unit sequence

Level 1 core units

Frontiers in Biology

Plant and Animal Biology

Level 2 core units

Ecology


Plant Physiology: Plants in Action

Plant Diversity and Conservation



Level 3 core units

Plant Physiological Ecology

Ecological Processes

Australian Vegetation



Complementary units

Students nominating Botany as their degree-specific major in the Bachelor of Science or Bachelor of Philosophy (Honours) course must also study:

Science, Society and Communication (unless Science Communication is taken as a second major)

Science, Society and Data Analysis

Principles of Inheritance

Soil–Plant Interactions

Business Law

www.studyat.uwa.edu.au/business-law

Requirements

Prerequisites: Mathematics25

Academic and English language requirements: See pages 202 – 203

The Business Law major will provide you with a solid understanding of the Australian legal system and how it impacts on business and commercial transactions. The major focuses on the fundamental relationship between law and business and is therefore ideal for those planning careers in a wide range of business areas including professional accounting, business management, international trade and industrial relations. It will equip you with high-level analytical, problem solving, research and communication skills that will enable you to recognise, analyse and, where possible, avoid the legal problems that arise in the course of many common business transactions. These vital business skills are relevant not just to business in the context of the Australian legal system but also in the context of the legal systems of most other ‘common law’ countries.



In the future

Business Law graduates are qualified for a variety of roles in the private and government sectors including careers in accountancy, business management, marketing, international trade, banking and finance, public service, industrial relations, and related professions and business endeavours.

Students can choose to pursue further studies at honours or postgraduate level, such as the Graduate Diploma or Master of Commercial and Resources Law, or Master of Commerce. While the study of this major is not a requirement for entry to the Juris Doctor (JD), students intending to progress to this professional postgraduate degree may benefit from the study of law at undergraduate level.

Additional information

www.handbooks.uwa.edu.au/businesslaw

Unit sequence

Level 1 core units

Financial Accounting

Introduction to Law

Level 2 core units

Legal Framework of Business

Company Law

Taxation Law



Level 3 core units

Finance Law

International Commercial Law

Marketing, Management and the Law



Complementary units

Students nominating Business Law as their degree-specific major in the Bachelor of Commerce or Bachelor of Philosophy (Honours) course must also study:

Economic and Business Statistics

Marketing Management

Microeconomics: Prices and Markets

Organisational Behaviour

Chemistry

www.studyat.uwa.edu.au/chemistry

Requirements

Prerequisites: Mathematics, Chemistry

Academic and English language requirements: See pages 202 – 203

Do you want to be part of the major advances that are being made in medicine, drugs, nanotechnology, new materials and the environment? Chemistry is central to virtually all areas of modern science and technology, providing a foundation for fields such as biochemistry, green chemistry, chemical engineering, food science, materials science, geology, nanotechnology and pharmacology. It is the science of the molecular scale, and encompasses the synthesis and study of molecules and materials, the exploration of their properties and the development of ways to use them. You will develop an understanding of the mechanisms, reactions and processes that occur at the molecular level. You will study the elements that make up all matter and how they interact with each other to construct living organisms, transmit power from the sun, produce minerals and fuel environmental processes.



In the future

Chemistry graduates will be in demand over the next decade in chemical manufacturing and processing industries such as pharmaceuticals, agrochemicals, fine chemicals, metals, polymers, electricity, steel, mining and petroleum. Career opportunities can be found in analytical and quality control laboratories as environmental and analytical or forensic chemists; and in universities, scientific institutes, government or private sector laboratories as research chemists.

Students can choose to pursue further studies at honours or postgraduate level, including the Master of Forensic Science, Master of Teaching, and Master of Science Communication, and the degrees leading to professional qualifications on pages 179 – 198.

Additional information

www.handbooks.uwa.edu.au/chemistry

Unit sequence

Level 1 core unit and option

Chemistry—Structure and Reactivity

Plus one of the following:

Chemistry—Properties and Energetics

Introductory Chemistry

Level 2 core units

Core Chemical Concepts and Techniques



Physical specialisation

Physical and Analytical Chemistry



Synthetic specialisation

Chemical Synthesis



LEVEL 3 CORE UNITS

Essential Chemical Skills

Chemical Explorations

Physical specialisation

Chemical Spectroscopy and Structure

Chemistry Beyond the Laboratory

Synthetic specialisation

Advanced Chemical Synthesis

Synthetic Applications

COMPLEMENTARY UNITS

Students nominating Chemistry as their degree-specific major in the Bachelor of Science or Bachelor of Philosophy (Honours) course must also study:

Introduction to Scientific Practices

Introductory Mathematics Specialist

Chinese

www.studyat.uwa.edu.au/chinese

Requirements

Prerequisites: None

Academic and English language requirements: See pages 202 – 203

Chinese (Mandarin) is the most widely used language in the world. The Chinese major caters for a range of language levels from beginner to native speaker and develops language skills, cultural literacy and knowledge of China. The major focuses on practical everyday Chinese (reading, writing, speaking and listening) with an emphasis over time on engaging with real-life situations and authentic texts. You are encouraged to take part of your language study in China through UWA’s student exchange and summer programs.



In the future

Graduates find careers in state and federal government departments including Defence and Foreign Affairs and Trade and in commercial enterprises with a China focus such as in resources, finance and tourism. Opportunities may also be pursued at a global level with institutions such as the World Bank and United Nations. Teaching Chinese as a second language can also be considered.



Students can choose to pursue studies at honours level or undertake a master’s degree such as the Master of Translation Studies or other degrees leading to the professional qualifications on pages 179 – 198.

Additional information

www.handbooks.uwa.edu.au/chinese

26Unit Sequence

Beginners

Pre-Intermediate

Intermediate

Advanced

LEVEL 1

Chinese 1

Chinese 3A

Chinese 3

Chinese 5

Chinese 2

Chinese 3

Chinese 4

Chinese 6

LEVEL 2

Chinese 3A

Chinese 4

Chinese 5

Chinese 7

Chinese 3

Chinese 5

Chinese 6

Chinese 8

2728Chinese 4

Chinese 6

Plus one of the units listed below2

Plus one of the units listed below2

LEVEL 3

Chinese 5

Chinese 7

Chinese 7

Chinese 9

Chinese 6

Chinese 8

Chinese 8

Chinese 10

29303132Plus unit below3

Plus unit below3

Plus unit below3

Plus unit below3













COMPLEMENTARY UNIT

Students nominating Chinese as their degree-specific major in the Bachelor of Arts or
Bachelor of Philosophy (Honours) course must also study:

Communication in Practice




STUDY ABROAD

China Field Study (equivalent to two Chinese language units)

Provides intensive language study during summer holidays at two universities in China.


Chinese Language and Cultural Immersion Program (Taiwan) (equivalent to one Chinese language unit)

Provides a four-week intensive language and cultural learning experience of any level at the National Cheng Kung University.


Chinese In-country (equivalent to four Chinese language units)

This is a 13-week full-time semester of study in China.



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