International Students The Vice-Chancellor’s Welcome



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Entry requirements

Entry to this course is extremely competitive. Entry requirements for this course are an Australian Tertiary Admission Rank (ATAR) or equivalent (see page 202) of at least 98 in most cases. From February 2015, international applicants will be required to sit the ISAT. The ISAT (International Student Admissions Test) must be sat prior to the closing date. The closing date for the course is 31 October of each year. Places will be limited. Before nominating your degree-specific major (and second major where relevant) you must have satisfied any specified prerequisites for the major (see pages 36 to 178 for detailed descriptions and prerequisites of majors).

The Bachelor of Philosophy (Honours) is only available for a February intake. The Summer Residence is a requirement of this course and all students are expected to attend.

Beyond your Bachelor of Philosophy (Honours)

Bachelor of Philosophy (Honours) graduates will have a wealth of opportunities upon graduation.

Graduates may choose postgraduate study by coursework and/or research, including courses leading to professional qualifications, or may prefer to enter the workforce directly after completing their undergraduate degree.

For information on pathways to postgraduate professional degrees, refer to the section at the back of this publication or obtain a copy of our 2014–2015 International Postgraduate Prospectus.


Choice of majors

Choose a degree-specific major from any of the four undergraduate degrees:

Bachelor of Arts 26

Bachelor of Commerce 28

Bachelor of Design 30

Bachelor of Science 32

Prerequisites may be specified for some majors. In most cases, you can also choose a second major from any of these four degrees if you wish.



Aboriginal Health and Wellbeing

www.studyat.uwa.edu.au/aboriginal-health

Requirements

Prerequisites: Mathematics14

Academic and English language requirements: See pages 202 – 203
The Aboriginal Health and Wellbeing major will provide you with a solid grounding in the multiple determinants that influence the health and wellbeing of Aboriginal peoples, families and communities in Australia.

You will gain a broad introduction to Aboriginal health and wellbeing from an Aboriginal perspective; an understanding of the underlying issues that influence health and wellbeing from historical, cultural, environmental, political and spiritual perspectives; an understanding of particular health problems within Aboriginal communities and their impacts; knowledge of the strategies, policies and practices that have been implemented to improve health and wellbeing with a particular focus on Aboriginal community-led initiatives; and practical experience in Aboriginal health settings.


In the future

Graduates will be well prepared for careers in Aboriginal health research, policy, management and practice in Aboriginal and government contexts.

Students can choose to pursue further studies at honours or postgraduate level in a range of areas including Aboriginal health and population health.

Students may also be able to proceed to one of the postgraduate professional health courses.



  • Health Promotion Professional

  • Health Promotion Officer

  • Health and Welfare Services Manager

  • Research Officer

  • Health Policy Officer

  • Health Policy Analyst


Additional information

www.handbooks.uwa.edu.au/aboriginalhealth

Unit sequence

Level 1 core units

Knowing Country: The Dreaming and Darwin

Aboriginal Encounters: Strangers in Our Backyard

Level 2 core units

Aboriginal Health and Wellbeing

Indigenous Knowledge: Mind, Body and Spirit

Level 3 core units

Aboriginal Health Community Organisation Placement

Aboriginal Health Research Project

Aboriginal Social and Emotional Wellbeing

Indigenous Research

Complementary units

Students nominating Aboriginal Health and Wellbeing as their degree-specific major in the Bachelor of Science or Bachelor of Philosophy (Honours) course must also study:

Human Biology I: Becoming Human

Human Biology II: Being Human

Foundations of Epidemiology and Biostatistics

Communication and Project Planning in Health

Accounting

www.studyat.uwa.edu.au/accounting
Requirements

Prerequisites: Mathematics15

Academic and English language requirements: See pages 202 – 203
Professional recognition

CPA Australia

Institute of Chartered Accountants, Australia

Institute of Public Accountants

Accounting is essential for monitoring and guiding business operations so that managers can gain an accurate and up-to-date picture of the financial health of their organisation.

The Accounting major focuses on the preparation, interpretation and communication of accounting information essential for effective decision making within and outside an organisation. You can choose to gain an overall understanding of the field or select units that allow you to specialise in either financial or management accounting, pursue professional membership, or complete a more generalised program of study covering a wide range of accounting subjects in greater depth. The major is designed to meet the accreditation requirements of the main professional accounting bodies, preparing you for entry into the workforce.



In the future

Professional accountants are employed as company directors, board members, chief executive officers, partners in business and in the profession, as well as in banking, company accounting, financial consulting, fund management, merchant banking, public accounting practice, stockbroking and taxation.

Students wishing to pursue further studies can do so at honours level or undertake a master’s degree such as the Master of Commerce or Master of Business Administration (after managerial work experience). They may also consider other postgraduate options including degrees leading to the professional qualifications listed on pages 179 to 198.

Additional information

www.handbooks.uwa.edu.au/accounting
Unit sequence

Level 1 core units16

Financial Accounting

Introduction to Finance

Level 2 core units1

Corporate Accounting

Management Accounting

Optional:

Taxation


Level 3 options

Select four (or three if Taxation unit is chosen at Level 2) including at least one from:

Financial Accounting: Theory and Practice or Strategic Management Accounting

Advanced Corporate Accounting

Auditing


Contemporary Managerial Accounting

Financial Statement Analysis

Financial Accounting: Theory and Practice

Performance Measurement and Evaluation

Strategic Management Accounting

Complementary units

Students nominating Accounting as their degree-specific major in the Bachelor of Commerce or Bachelor of Philosophy (Honours) course must also study:

Economic and Business Statistics

Marketing Management

Microeconomics: Prices and Markets

Organisational Behaviour

Agricultural Science

www.studyat.uwa.edu.au/agriculture
Requirements

Prerequisites: Mathematics17

Academic and English language requirements: See pages 202 – 203

Australia’s agricultural industry is a key part of the world’s food supply system. The population of the world is tipped to reach 9.5 billion by 2050 and the world will have to feed and clothe 50 per cent more people than we do now without destroying the planet. The challenges of a rapidly growing population, climate change, and the limitations of land and fresh water all impact on the ability of agriculture to meet the demand for food, fibre and fuel.

Your studies will include soil science, genetics, cropping systems, soil–plant interaction, livestock production, agricultural economics and grain marketing. UWA is ranked first18 in Australia for Life and Agricultural Sciences, and has a diverse range of excellent scientists who are active in industry and scientific development. This major includes field work and extended field trips.19

In the future

There is a shortage of agricultural science graduates. Career opportunities are expansive and the skills you will learn are transferable to many other fields and areas of study; pathways include agribusiness, agronomy, biotechnology, consultancy, finance, food industry advice, journalism, market analysis, market development, research or politics.

You will be encouraged to make contact with industry as well as to pursue further study and develop interests during and after your Bachelor of Science. Students can choose to pursue further studies at honours or postgraduate level in Agricultural Science, specialising in economics, production, breeding or soil sciences, as well as degrees leading to the professional qualifications listed on pages 179 to 198.

Additional information

www.handbooks.uwa.edu.au/agriculture
Unit sequence

Level 1 core units

Frontiers in Biology

Plant and Animal Biology

Level 2 core units

Geomorphology and Soils

Animal Function and Structure

Level 3 core units

Soil–Plant Interactions

Agricultural Economics and Marketing

Agricultural Systems

Clean, Green and Ethical Animal Production

Complementary units

Students nominating Agricultural Science as their degree-specific major in the Bachelor of Science or Bachelor of Philosophy (Honours) course must also study:

Science, Society and Communication (unless Science Communication is taken as a second major)

Science, Society and Data Analysis

Principles of Inheritance

Plant Physiology: Plants in Action

Anatomy and Human Biology

www.studyat.uwa.edu.au/anatomy
Requirements

Prerequisites: Mathematics20

Academic and English language requirements: See pages 202 – 203

What is it that makes us human? A major in Anatomy and Human Biology will allow you to explore what it means to be human in an integrative way, combining studies of the biology and behaviour of human beings with current social and ethical issues. The units offered within this major cover topics as diverse as human functional anatomy; genetics, reproduction, embryology and growth; microscopic structures of cells and tissues; structure and function of the nervous system; and ecology, behaviour and biosocial interactions. You will explore all of these from the molecular to the population level and beyond.



In the future

Graduates wanting a career in research find jobs in areas such as sleep science, assisted reproductive technologies, pharmaceutical training and neuroscience. There are opportunities for employment as scientists in commercial organisations, as cultural advisers or in sales associated with these types of organisations, in public science education, in museums and in the media.

Students can pursue further studies at honours and/or master’s level including a master’s degree in Human Biology, Anatomical Sciences or a PhD. Other further study options include the Graduate Certificate or Graduate Diploma in Adult Sleep Science, Graduate Diploma in Work Health and Safety, Master of Forensic Science, and the degrees leading to the professional qualifications listed on pages 179 – 198.

Additional information

www.handbooks.uwa.edu.au/anatomy

Unit sequence

Level 1 core units

Human Biology I: Becoming Human

Human Biology II: Being Human

Level 2 options (select one)

Biological Anthropology: Human Adaptation and Variation

Human Reproductive Biology

Plus one of the following:

Human Structure and Development

Human Functional Anatomy

Human Organs and Systems



Level 3 OPTIONS (select one)

Human Biology: Applications and Investigations I

Human Biology: Applications and Investigations II

Plus three of the following:

Human Structure and Function

Biological Anthropology: Genes and Society

Cells, Tissues, and Development

Human Evolutionary Ecology

Human Reproduction



Anthropology and Sociology

www.studyat.uwa.edu.au/anthropology

Requirements

Prerequisites: None

Academic and English language requirements: See pages 202 – 203

Anthropology and Sociology is the study of the nature of humanity along with the complexities of social relationships, and offers a way of understanding the whole context of human experiences. This major incorporates the study of cultures, institutions, social behaviours, economies and systems of meaning, and includes the topics of religions, politics, kinship, gender, education, health, migration, landscapes and the media. As a student you will investigate various cultural theories and a range of studies on behaviours and beliefs that are used to explore the great diversity of past and present societies. Your study will help you to understand your place in the world and equip you with useful skills for living and working in a changing, multicultural society.



In the future

Graduates find employment in mining and Indigenous issues both in Australia and overseas, social welfare, the law, physical and mental health, environmental problem solving and assessment, urban planning, education, development, foreign aid and agricultural development.

Students can choose to pursue further studies at honours level or other postgraduate options including degrees leading to the professional qualifications listed on pages 179 – 198.

Additional information

www.handbooks.uwa.edu.au/anthropology

Unit sequence

Level 1 core units

Being Human: Culture, Identity and Society

Global Changes, Local Responses

Level 2 core unit and option

Development of Social Thought



Plus one of the following:

Religion: Anthropological and Sociological Approaches

Constructing Cultures Through Media

Social Meaning of Money

Healing, Medicine and Culture

Indigenous Australia

Social Inequality

Sex, Gender and Social Life

Legal Anthropology

Australian Society: Facts and Fantasies

Psychological Anthropology

Refugees, Human Rights, Violence and Fear

Popular Culture in Asia

Environment, Power and Disasters in Asia



Level 3 core unit and options

Doing Ethnography



Plus three of the following:

Cities, Migration and Globalisation

Advanced Social Theory

Health and Illness in Local/Global Context

Environmental Anthropology

Engaged Anthropology

Global Indigeneities

Business Anthropology



Complementary unit

Students nominating Anthropology and Sociology as their degree-specific major in the Bachelor of Arts or Bachelor of Philosophy (Honours) course must also study:

Communication in Practice



Applied Computing

www.studyat.uwa.edu.au/computing
Requirements

Prerequisites: Mathematics

Academic and English language requirements: See pages 202 – 203

Strong computing and data analysis skills are necessary in an ever-increasing number of workplace contexts. This major focuses on data and scientific computation including technologies for efficient and effective data collection, conversion, analysis, visualisation, interpretation, storage, search, synthesis and provision through the internet. Many professional organisations extensively use computing resources, providing you with many diverse career options as a graduate. An Applied Computing major will provide you with practical computing and information technology skills, and is ideal to combine with studies in science and engineering.



In the future

A broad range of professions rely heavily on computing resources, creating many opportunities in areas such as mining and resource engineering, bioinformatics and biochemistry, computational physics and astronomy, and biomechanics.

Students can choose to pursue further studies at honours level or postgraduate options including degrees leading to the professional qualifications listed on pages 179 – 198.

Additional information

www.handbooks.uwa.edu.au/computing

Unit sequence

Level 1 core units

Problem Solving and Programming

Programming and Systems

Level 2 core units

Databases

Computer Analysis and Visualisation

Level 3 core units

Professional Computing

Data Exploration and Mining

Web and Internet Technologies

High Performance Computing

Complementary units

Students nominating Applied Computing as their degree-specific major in the Bachelor of Science or Bachelor of Philosophy (Honours) course must also study:

Introductory Mathematics Foundations (for students who do not have the appropriate background in mathematics)

Engineering Challenges in a Global World

Statistics for Science



Archaeology

www.studyat.uwa.edu.au/archaeology

Requirements

Prerequisites: None

Academic and English language requirements: See pages 202 – 203

Archaeology is the study of past human societies through their material remains—the things people leave behind. UWA is the only university in Western Australia where you can study the Archaeology major which provides its students with an overall view of world archaeological studies with particular emphasis on Australia. Our expertise includes Indigenous, historical and maritime archaeology, exploring the full breadth of Australia’s rich Indigenous and colonial history to provide a unique vantage point from which to consider the almost 60,000 years of human habitation on this continent. The analytical and practical elements of the discipline are taught within laboratory and fieldwork units which are held annually for two or three weeks. With an active focus on research and strong industry links, UWA is home to Centre for Rock Art Research and Management and Eureka Archaeological Research and Consulting.



In the future

Archaeologists are currently in great demand by government departments, the mining and resources industries and other organisations both in Australia and overseas. They are either employed by these organisations directly or they work as private consultants, providing advice about archaeological heritage matters. Other major career prospects include museum curators and researchers, or the education sector.

Students can choose to pursue further studies at honours level or undertake a master’s degree such as the Master of Professional Archaeology, or other postgraduate options including the professional qualifications listed on pages 179 – 198.

Additional information

www.handbooks.uwa.edu.au/archaeology

Unit sequence

Level 1 core units

Discoveries in Archaeology

Archaeology Today: Principles and Themes

Level 2 options (select two)

Archaeology of Colonisation and Contact

The Emerging Human

The Archaeology of Rock Art

Historical Archaeology

Level 3 Options (select four)

Archaeological Field Methods

Archaeological Laboratory Methods

Archaeology of Indigenous Australia

Heritage Archaeology

Neolithic and Bronze Age Europe

Palaeolithic and Mesolithic Europe

Roman Archaeology

Making History

Roman Britain



Complementary unit

Students nominating Archaeology as their degree-specific major in the Bachelor of Arts or Bachelor of Philosophy (Honours) course must also study:

Communication in Practice



Architecture

www.studyat.uwa.edu.au/architecture

Requirements

Prerequisites: None

Academic and English language requirements: See pages 202 – 203

Co-requisite:

Architecture is only available as a degree-specific major. Students must also study the Integrated Design Major (see page 117) as its co-requisite.

Majoring in Architecture provides you with a rich combination of experiences in creativity, the humanities and the sciences. You will learn about the conceptualisation and design of individual buildings, urban configurations and landscapes in response to economic, technical and social needs and desires. Within this major you will use a range of different technologies and production methods to create drawings, models and prototypes. Your practical studies will be supported by investigating design communication, sustainable design and considerations of relevant historical and theoretical aspects of architecture. A major in Architecture will equip you with the knowledge and skills for further studies in architecture. It must be taken as a degree-specific major alongside Integrated Design (see page 117).

In the future

Students with majors in Architecture and Integrated Design may progress to the professionally accredited Master of Architecture. They may also undertake further studies in similar disciplines such as Landscape Architecture, Urban Design or a range of other creative disciplines.

You may also decide to use your undergraduate studies as a foundation for a career in architectural drafting, city and regional planning or environmental studies.

Additional information

www.handbooks.uwa.edu.au/architecture

Exhibitions showcasing the amazing work of students are held throughout the year in the Faculty of Architecture, Landscape and Visual Arts.


www.alva.uwa.edu.au/cullity-gallery

Unit sequence

Level 1 core units

Studio Fundamentals

Architecture Studio 1

Level 2 core units

Design Communication

Architecture Studio 2

Level 3 core units

Architecture Studio 3

Construction

History and Theories of the Built Environment



Complementary units
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