International Students The Vice-Chancellor’s Welcome



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Additional information

www.handbooks.uwa.edu.au/neuroscience
Unit sequence

LEVEL 1 CORE UNITS

Psychology: Mind and Brain

Psychology: Behaviour in Context

LEVEL 2 CORE UNITS

Human Neurobiology

Physiology of Cells

LEVEL 3 CORE UNITS

Neuroscience

Comparative Neurobiology

Advanced Neuroscience 1

Advanced Neuroscience 2

COMPLEMENTARY UNITS

Students nominating Neuroscience as their degree-specific major in the Bachelor of Science or Bachelor of Philosophy (Honours) course must also study:

Introduction to Scientific Practices



Select one pair of units:

Frontiers in Biology; and Molecular Biology of the Cell

Human Biology I: Becoming Human; and Human Biology II: Being Human

Human Biology I: Becoming Human; and Molecular Biology of the Cell



Plus one of the following:

Cognitive Neuroscience

Perception and Sensory Neuropsychology

Pathology and Laboratory Medicine

www.studyat.uwa.edu.au/pathology

Requirements

Prerequisites: Mathematics69; recommended subject: Chemistry

Academic and English language requirements: See pages 202 – 203

A major in Pathology and Laboratory Medicine will allow you to understand the causes and mechanisms of human disease, as well as how they are investigated in the laboratory. The units offered within this major cover the fundamentals of disease mechanisms, the range of human diseases and their investigation, treatment and prevention. As a diagnostic specialty, Pathology and Laboratory Medicine plays a critical role in evidence-based medicine and provides the basis of modern scientific medical knowledge. This major will give you an appreciation of how medical research forms new insights into disease every day.



In the future

After completing this major, students have numerous professional pathways including employment in a wide range of allied and paramedical fields; university and hospital laboratory research; the healthcare or pharmaceutical industry; and diagnostic laboratories.

Students can choose to pursue further studies at honours level, or a postgraduate research degree such as a PhD. Students hoping to progress to study in medicine, nursing, podiatry or dental medicine at postgraduate level may benefit from the study of this major.

Additional information

www.handbooks.uwa.edu.au/pathology

Unit sequence

LEVEL 1 CORE UNITS

Biological Chemistry

Molecular Biology of the Cell

LEVEL 2 CORE UNITS

Fundamentals of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine

Introduction to Human Disease

LEVEL 3 CORE UNITS70

Pathology and Laboratory Medicine I

Pathology and Laboratory Medicine II

Cancer Pathology

Medical Genetics

COMPLEMENTARY UNITS

Students nominating Pathology and Laboratory Medicine as their degree-specific major in the Bachelor of Science or Bachelor of Philosophy (Honours) course must also study:

Frontiers in Biology

Introductory Chemistry (for students without an appropriate background in Chemistry)

Biochemistry and Molecular Biology of the Cell

Introduction to Infectious Diseases and Immunology

Pharmacology

www.studyat.uwa.edu.au/pharmacology

Requirements

Prerequisites: Mathematics; Recommended subjects: Chemistry and Biology

Academic and English language requirements: See pages 202 – 203

How do medicines produce their beneficial effects on human diseases? How can drugs target particular organs, cells, proteins and genes? This major provides you with the scientific concepts required to understand the effects of drugs on the human body, combined with an appreciation of how these effects are used to treat human diseases. The units offered include drug-receptor interactions, dose-response relationships, intracellular signalling, drug metabolism and elimination, toxicology, respiratory pharmacology, immunopharmacology, drug discovery and development, as well as the role of genetics in dictating individual responses to drugs. Theoretical content is reinforced by practical laboratory sessions and computer-based workshops.



In the future

Graduates have the chance to enter a range of satisfying career settings including research in a hospital (diagnostic or research laboratory); employment in the pharmaceutical industry (research or commercial setting) as clinical trial coordinators; in state or federal regulatory agencies that oversee drug use such as the Therapeutic Goods Administration or State Health Department; and in science education (secondary or tertiary sectors).

As with most biomedical disciplines, your employment prospects will be enhanced by the completion of study at honours or postgraduate level. Master’s degree options include the Master of Laboratory Medicine or Master of Pharmacy. They may also consider other postgraduate options including degrees leading to the professional qualifications listed on pages 179 – 198.

Additional information

www.handbooks.uwa.edu.au/pharmacology

Unit sequence

LEVEL 1 CORE UNIT AND OPTION

Molecular Biology of the Cell



Plus one of the following:

Biological Chemistry

Chemistry—Structure and Reactivity

LEVEL 2 CORE UNITS

Foundations of Pharmacology

Human Pharmacology

LEVEL 3 CORE UNITS

Molecular Pharmacology

Molecular Pharmacology Methods

Systems Pharmacology

Systems Pharmacology Methods

Philosophy

www.studyat.uwa.edu.au/philosophy

Requirements

Prerequisites: None

Academic and English language requirements: See pages 202 – 203

The study of Philosophy involves thinking about some of the big questions we ask during our lifetime: Does God exist? Do the sciences tell us the truth about the world? How can we say what we mean? Are other people’s experiences like our own? What does it mean to be conscious? What are emotions and how are they relevant to our lives? Philosophy teaches you to distinguish between good and bad arguments and make informed recommendations on contentious issues. Studying Philosophy allows you to explore a vast range of influential ideas, from the ancient philosophers whose works are preserved in manuscripts from India, China and Greece, right down to cutting-edge contemporary work on pressing ethical issues, the nature of mind and artificial intelligence. UWA is the only university in Western Australia that teaches units in formal logic.



In the future

Philosophy graduates can be found in challenging areas such as strategic planning, where their conceptual skills and the ability to ‘see the big picture’ are highly valued. With a growing awareness of corporate, medical and environmental ethics, students who specialise in ethics have the opportunity to work in these areas. Recent graduates have found work in journalism, computing, libraries, law and the public service.

Students can choose to pursue further studies at honours level or other postgraduate options including degrees leading to professional qualifications listed on pages 179 – 198.

Additional information

www.handbooks.uwa.edu.au/philosophy

Unit sequence

LEVEL 1 optionS (select two)

Introduction to Critical Thinking

Justice and Contemporary Ethics

God, Mind and Knowledge



LEVEL 2 OPTIONS (select two)

Bioethics

Logic

Philosophy of Religion



Problems in Philosophical Psychology

Philosophy of Mind

Philosophy of Science

LEVEL 3 OPTIONS (select four)

Continental Philosophy

Philosophy East and West

Formal Logic

Moral Theory

Meaning, Truth and Language

Aesthetics

Metaphysics



COMPLEMENTARY UNIT

Students nominating Philosophy as their degree-specific major in the Bachelor of Arts or Bachelor of Philosophy (Honours) course must also study:

Communication in Practice



Physics

www.studyat.uwa.edu.au/physics

Requirements

Prerequisites: Mathematics, Physics

Academic and English language requirements: See pages 202 – 203

Physics examines the world around us at the most fundamental level, from the origin and fate of the universe, to the behaviour of matter on subatomic length scales—and everything else in between. The hallmark of the Physics major at UWA is the access it gives you to the frontiers of modern physics via a focus on mathematical skills. You will apply the key pillars of relativity and quantum physics to atomic, molecular and nuclear physics, condensed matter physics, photonics and astrophysics. You will also discover physics is the driving force behind many advanced technologies, from radar to lasers, from transistors to quantum computers and MRI scanners.



In the future

The Physics major can open the door to many career choices. Your strong problem-solving and critical thinking abilities will be in demand from employers in industry, government and the business and finance sectors. You will also find employment in teaching and high-tech industries, where discipline-specific skills are important. Further studies will lead to careers in research or academia. The Square Kilometre Array (SKA), which will be partly located in WA, is likely to provide a variety of job opportunities for Physics graduates.

Students can choose to pursue further studies by undertaking a Master of Physical Science (with specialisation options in Physics or Astronomy and Astrophysics). Other study options include the Master of Medical Physics, Master of Teaching, or a PhD.

Additional information

www.handbooks.uwa.edu.au/physics

Unit sequence

LEVEL 1 CORE UNITS

Physics for Scientists and Engineers

Modern Physics

LEVEL 2 CORE UNITs

Quantum Mechanics 1 and Electrodynamics

The Physics of Particles

LEVEL 3 CORE UNITS AND OPTION

Mathematical Physics

Optics and Special Topics

Classical Mechanics and Electrodynamics



Plus one of the following:

Astrophysics and Space Science

Quantum Mechanics 2 and Atomic Physics

COMPLEMENTARY UNITS

Students nominating Physics as their degree-specific major in the Bachelor of Science or Bachelor of Philosophy (Honours) course, or as their second major in other degree courses, must also study:

Mathematical Methods 1

Mathematical Methods 2

Mathematical Methods 3

Computer Analysis and Visualisation

Physiology

www.studyat.uwa.edu.au/physiology

Requirements

Prerequisites: Mathematics71; recommended subject: Chemistry

Academic and English language requirements: See pages 202 – 203

How does your body cope with stresses such as intense exercise, blood loss, and dehydration? How does your nervous system respond to the world around you? What controls movement within the body and locomotion of the body itself? A Physiology major will provide answers to these questions and teach you how the human body works. Physiology examines life processes, from the molecular and cellular level, to tissues and organs, and explains how these interact together, with the environment, to produce beneficial results for the organism. You will also examine how disease affects bodily function, and how understanding physiology can lead to the development of new diagnostic and therapeutic strategies to combat the mechanisms of disease.



In the future

A Physiology major can lead to careers in the biomedical industry and research laboratories. There is growing demand for Physiology graduates to investigate the action of genes in the body. Physiologists also undertake careers in the areas of exercise physiology, fitness, health promotion, science communication in the media, laboratory management, secondary school science teaching, and university lecturing.

As with most biomedical disciplines, your employment prospects will be enhanced by further study at honours or postgraduate level. Master’s degree options include the Master of Clinical Audiology, the Master of Clinical Audiology/PhD or Master of Pharmacy.

Additional information

www.handbooks.uwa.edu.au/physiology
Unit sequence

LEVEL 1 OPTIONS

Select one pair of units:

Human Biology I: Becoming Human; and Human Biology II: Being Human

Human Biology I: Becoming Human; and Molecular Biology of the Cell

Frontiers in Biology; and Molecular Biology of the Cell



LEVEL 2 CORE UNITS

Physiology of Human Body Systems

Physiology of Cells

LEVEL 3 CORE UNITS

Physiology of Membranes, Muscles and Signalling

Physiology of Cardiovascular and Respiratory Systems

Physiology of Nutrition and Metabolism

Physiology of Integrated Organ Function

COMPLEMENTARY UNIT

Students nominating Physiology as their degree-specific major in the Bachelor of Science or Bachelor of Philosophy (Honours) course with no background in Chemistry must also study:

Introductory Chemistry

Political Science and International Relations

www.studyat.uwa.edu.au/political-science

Requirements

Prerequisites: None

Academic and English language requirements: See pages 202 – 203

Societies can only continue to exist if they solve the problem of internal order and are able to protect themselves from external threats. Political Science and International Relations studies how societies govern themselves and the collective decisions, or public policies, they need, or choose, to make. Attention is given to the different ways government is organised; values such as liberty, participation, majority rule and minority rights which inform political institutions and public policy; and ideologies such as conservatism, liberalism, socialism, feminism and environmentalism which have motivated much political action in modern societies. International relations focuses on the ways in which states and peoples interact with other states, regional or global political organisations, and social movements in an increasingly interdependent world.



In the future

Graduates of this major are not only found in political parties, ministers’ offices and parliament but many pursue careers in Commonwealth or WA public services (including the Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade). Others enter journalism or a wide range of organisations in Australia and overseas, or else use their training as a basis for further study in law, education, social work, communications and other areas.

Students can choose to pursue further studies at honours and postgraduate level, including the Graduate Certificate, Graduate Diploma and the Master of International Relations as well as the Master of International Journalism.

Additional information

www.handbooks.uwa.edu.au/politicalscience

Unit sequence

LEVEL 1 CORE UNITS

The Liberal Democratic State

The Contemporary International System

LEVEL 2 OPTIONS (select two)

Public Policy

History of Political Ideas

Strategy, Diplomacy and Conflict

Politics in the USA

International Political Economy

Politics of the Mass Media

Global Governance

International Relations in East Asia

Constitutional Politics: Australia in Comparative Perspective

The Evolution of International Order

LEVEL 3 OPTIONS (select four)

Political Science Internship

Australian Foreign Policy

Contemporary Political Theory

Elections, Mass Media and Politics

Islam and World Politics

Politics in Greater China

Politics of New Europe

Social Choice and Game Theory

States, Welfare and Environmental Policy

The Politics of Representation: Australia in Comparative Perspective

Democratisation in Asia

South Asia and the Middle East: Foreign Relations and Politics

COMPLEMENTARY UNIT

Students nominating Political Science and International Relations as their degree-specific major in the Bachelor of Arts or Bachelor of Philosophy (Honours) course must also study:

Communication in Practice



Population Health

www.studyat.uwa.edu.au/population-health

Requirements

Prerequisites: Mathematics72

Academic and English language requirements: See pages 202 – 203

Population Health focuses on health promotion and disease prevention in populations, with an emphasis on current and emerging global health issues such as the ageing population and disparities in health across the community. As a student you will investigate various impacts on health, how these factors interact, and how they can be addressed to improve the health of communities. Your studies will focus on how health may be improved on a local and global scale, including the prevention of acute and chronic ill health and the promotion of good health practices through community programs and the provision of effective health services.

The Population Health major complements a wide range of disciplines such as pharmacology, microbiology, anthropology, psychology, commerce or economics, enabling you to develop expertise in health promotion, research, administration or health economics. It also provides an excellent background for further postgraduate studies in public health, medicine, dentistry, nursing and podiatric medicine.

In the future

A wide range of employment opportunities in population health exist, including health promotion, policy, administration, epidemiology or research within federal, state or local government departments, private health agencies and non-government organisations.

Students can choose to pursue further studies at honours or postgraduate level such as the Graduate Certificate in Population Health Studies, Master of Public Health (coursework or research) or a PhD.

Additional information

www.handbooks.uwa.edu.au/populationhealth

Unit sequence

Level 1 core units

Health and Illness in Human Populations

Health and Globalisation

Level 2 core units

Foundations of Epidemiology and Biostatistics

Disease Prevention and Control

Level 3 core units

Health Systems and Policy

Health Industry Leadership

Health Research Design and Methods

Health Promotion

Complementary units

Students nominating Population Health as their degree-specific major in the Bachelor of Science or Bachelor of Philosophy (Honours) course must also study:

Aboriginal Health and Wellbeing

Communication and Project Planning in Health

Psychological Science

www.studyat.uwa.edu.au/psychological-science

Requirements

Prerequisites: Mathematics73

Academic and English language requirements: See pages 202 – 203

Are you interested in how we learn, remember and think? Have you ever wondered how we control our movements, or how we sense and respond to the objects and events around us? Psychologists are interested in how and why people behave the way they do. Psychological Science is the scientific study of mental processes and behaviour, and is a challenging and wide-ranging discipline. A major in Psychological Science will provide you with a scientific understanding of our psychological processes and the relationship of these processes to brain function. You will also develop an understanding of how these psychological processes are affected by ageing, brain damage and disease.



In the future

The Psychological Science major will prepare you for a career in research as well as a range of careers in which knowledge of human nature is valuable, such as government agencies, business, teaching and welfare. Your expertise with social survey methods, computer technology and measurement techniques mean that market research, advertising and the media are also career options.

When this major is taken with the Psychology in Society major (see page 67) it can lead to further study and professional qualifications in Psychology.

Thinking of becoming a clinical psychologist?

You must take both Psychological Science and Psychology in Society, followed by an honours year. Please indicate on the application form at the back if you wish to take both majors.



Additional information

www.handbooks.uwa.edu.au/psychologicalscience

Unit sequence

LEVEL 1 CORE UNITS

Psychology: Mind and Brain

Psychology: Behaviour in Context

LEVEL 2 CORE UNIT AND OPTION

Psychological Research Methods



Plus one of the following:

Psychology: Atypical Development

Cognitive Psychology

Cognitive Neuroscience

Perception and Sensory Neuropsychology

LEVEL 3 CORE UNITS AND OPTIONS

Psychological Research Methods: Design and Analysis

Psychology: Specialist Research Topics

Plus two of the following:

Psychology: Atypical Development

Cognitive Psychology

Cognitive Neuroscience

Perception and Sensory Neuropsychology

Psychology in Society

www.studyat.uwa.edu.au/psychology-society

Requirements

Prerequisites: None

Academic and English language requirements: See pages 202 – 203

Psychology in Society is a fascinating and diverse area of study that touches upon many aspects of daily life, seeking to answer questions about how and why people behave the way they do. How do groups communicate? Can panic be controlled? How do attitudes to alcohol consumption develop? These are just a few of the questions psychologists investigate. Studying this major will help you build a scientific understanding of human behaviour and its underlying psychological processes. You will find an emphasis on the measurement of psychological abilities such as intelligence, how these abilities develop through the life span and on the processes that govern the relationships between people and groups in society. Completing this major together with the Psychological Science major (see page 165) allows you to continue onto an honours year which is necessary for provisional registration as a psychologist.


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