Instructional Unit Authors



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Ongoing Discipline-Specific Learning Experiences

1.

Description:

Think/work like a historian by sorting, organizing and classifying primary and secondary sources chronologically

Teacher Resources:

http://www.loc.gov/teachers/usingprimarysources/resources/Analyzing_Books_and_Other_Printed_Texts.pdf (Analyzing Books and Other Printed Texts Worksheet from the Library of Congress)

http://www.educationoasis.com/curriculum/GO/sequence.htm (Chain of Events Graphic Organizer)

http://www.umbc.edu/che/tahlessons/pdf/historylabs/In_What_Ways_We_faculty:RS20.pdf (Chronological Graphic Organizer)


Student Resources:

http://www.loc.gov/teachers/usingprimarysources/resources/Analyzing_Books_and_Other_Printed_Texts.pdf (Analyzing Books and Other Printed Texts Worksheet from the Library of Congress)

http://www.educationoasis.com/curriculum/GO/sequence.htm (Chain of Events Graphic Organizer)

http://www.umbc.edu/che/tahlessons/pdf/historylabs/In_What_Ways_We_faculty:RS20.pdf (Chronological Graphic Organizer)


Skills:

Gather and organize historical content into a chronological order

Assessment:

Students will create multiple timelines.







2.

Description:

Read like a historian to determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used, including conversation and academic vocabulary related to history/ social studies (CCSS.RH.6-8.1; CCSS.RH.6-8.4)

Teacher Resources:

http://olc.spsd.sk.ca/de/pd/instr/strats/wordwall/ (Word Walls)

http://www.readingrockets.org/strategies/word_walls/ (Word Walls)



Student Resources:

http://www.realclassroomideas.com/resources/graphic+organizers-wordbank.pdf (Word Bank Graphic Organizer)

http://www.eslpages.com/samplesheets/samplewordbanksheets.htm (Word Bank Worksheet)

http://www.realclassroomideas.com/resources/graphic+organizers-vocabcards.pdf (Vocabulary Graphic Organizer)


Skills:

Collect vocabulary words and create an on-going word wall using context clues, definitions and visual support

Assessment:

Students will create a word wall to visualize important vocabulary throughout the unit.




3.

Description:

Think and work like a historian by looking at primary and secondary sources for perspectives on historical events

Teacher Resources:

http://teachinghistory.org/best-practices/using-primary-sources/25226 (Thinking like a historian)

http://teachinghistory.org/teaching-materials (Helping students write critically)

http://sheg.stanford.edu/rlh (Reading like an historian - set up a free account)

http://sheg.stanford.edu/historical-thinking-chart (Classroom poster outlining historical thinking - need free account)

http://www.archives.gov/education/special-topics.html (Primary source document analysis worksheets from the National Archives)

http://ourdocuments.gov/index.php?flash=true& (Primary sources from the National Archives)



Student Resources:

http://teachinghistory.org/best-practices/using-primary-sources/25226 (Thinking like a historian: lots of classroom resources: teachers can set up a free account)

http://teachinghistory.org/teaching-materials/teaching-guides/25690 (Learning to read primary documents)



Skills:

Evaluate a historical source for point of view and historical context

Assessment:

Students will keep a journal personally responding to the primary and secondary sources studied in the unit. The journal will title the document/artifact; identify whether the source is primary or secondary; include a one-sentence summary of the major idea; and a three-sentence personal reaction to the information gained from the source (CCSS.RH.6-8.2)




4.

Description:

Think and work like a historian to identify cause/effect relationships.

Teacher Resources:

http://www.humanities.uci.edu/history/ucihp/literacy_institute/literacy%20sample%20.pdf (strategies for teaching cause and effect in writing)

http://www.iptv.org/mississippi/lessonplans/ActivityPDFs/SocialStudies/CauseandEffect.pdf (identifying cause and effect relationships guide)



Student Resources:

https://docs.google.com/viewer?a=v&pid=sites&srcid=ZGVmYXVsdGRvbWFpbnxhdXNkdGhpbmt8Z3g6NGNjMDJhMDFlYzE1ZWNhNQ (cause/effect graphic organizer)

Skills:

Analyze the causes and effects of significant events concerning the relationship between Britain and the Colonies.

Assessment:

Students will complete cause/effect graphic organizers and timelines throughout the unit.







Prior Knowledge and Experiences

Students should have a basic understanding of the catalysts for the Age of Exploration (e.g., trade and world trading partners, dominant and growing European kingdoms), the reasons for colonial expansion, and the earlier colonization of the “new world “or the Americas. Students should also have a basic knowledge of the use of primary and secondary sources and their application for the study of history.




Learning Experience # 1

The teacher may engage students in a discussion so students can review the economic and political benefits of British colonization of North America.

Generalization Connection(s):

The strength and stability of a nation depends on the establishment and maintenance of economic independence, cultural traditions, and social institutions

Teacher Resources:

http://users.humboldt.edu/ogayle/hist110/ColonialTradeMap.gif (Map of colonial overseas trade)

http://d-maps.com/m/world/atlantiquenord/atlantiquenord02.gif (Blank map of North America and Great Britain)

http://www.landofthebrave.info/mercantilism.htm (Information about Mercantilism)

http://www.sparknotes.com/testprep/books/sat2/history/chapter5section4.rhtml (Lesson Plan: British Mercantilism and the Cost of Empire)

http://www.econedlink.org/lessons/docs_lessons/567_colonial1.pdf (Lesson Plan: “Understanding the Colonial Economy” – includes data that could be used by students)

http://score.rims.k12.ca.us/score_lessons/market_to_market/ (Lesson Plan: To Market to Market – A Study of the Colonial Economy from 1600-1750)



Student Resources:

http://www.landofthebrave.info/mercantilism.htm (Information about Mercantilism)

http://www.sparknotes.com/testprep/books/sat2/history/chapter5section4.rhtml (SparkNotes on Colonial Mercantilism)

http://education-portal.com/academy/lesson/the-13-colonies-developing-economy-overseas-trade.html (The 13 Colonies: Developing Economy and Overseas Trade)

http://www.econedlink.org/lessons/docs_lessons/567_colonial1.pdf (Lesson Plan: “Understanding the Colonial Economy” – includes data that could be used by students)



Assessment:

Students will create an annotated map illustrating and describing the economic relationships (e.g., resources, trade goods, products) between Great Britain and their North American colonies.

Differentiation:

(Multiple means for students to access content and multiple modes for student to express understanding.)



Access (Resources and/or Process)

Expression (Products and/or Performance)

http://www.rctednet.net/newmanrc/slave%20trade%20web%20project/Slave%20Trade%20webHelenaPoulakis/Slave%20TradeHP.html (A fill in the blank trade map)

Students may be provided with an outline map to complete

Extensions for depth and complexity:

Access (Resources and/or Process)

Expression (Products and/or Performance)

http://wiki.dickinson.edu/index.php/File:Imported_raw_materials.jpg (Import/export data for British/colonial trade)

Students may add import and export data to their map




Critical Content:

  • British reliance on colonies for raw materials for production of goods

  • Examples of resources traded from the colonies to Britain

  • Examples of finished goods sent from Britain to be sold in the colonies

  • The goals of a mercantilist economy

  • Establishment of trading companies or joint stock companies to establish permanent colonies in support of a mercantilist economy

  • Reasons for and goals of establishing trade policies that required the colonies to trade exclusively with Britain

  • The Northern colonies had a comparative advantage (textiles) and the Southern colonies had an absolute advantage (tobacco)

Key Skills:

Critical Language:

Mercantilism, colonialism, import, export, natural resource, human resource, product, trade good, manufacture, commerce, Triangular Trade, raw goods, comparative advantage, absolute advantage, economy(ic), trading companies, joint stock company




Learning Experience # 2

The teacher may provide various primary and secondary sources (e.g., documents, letters, journals) so that students can begin to understand colonists’ identification as British subjects politically, socially, and culturally.

Generalization Connection(s):

The strength and stability of a nation depends on the establishment and maintenance of economic independence, cultural traditions, and social institutions

Teacher Resources:

http://edsitement.neh.gov/albany-congress-and-political-identity-north-american-colonists (Lesson Plan: The Albany Congress and Political Identity)

http://www.digitalhistory.uh.edu/teachers/lesson_plans/pdfs/unit1_3.pdf (Readings on the Government in England and the Colonies)

http://nationalhumanitiescenter.org/pds/becomingamer/growth/text9/massachusettsgovernor.pdf (A Governor’s View on governing the Massachusetts Colony)

http://avalon.law.yale.edu/17th_century/england.asp (Text of the English Bill of Rights)

http://www.duhaime.org/LawMuseum/LawGallery/Item43/1689_-_the_English_Bill_of_Rights.aspx (Image: the English Bill of Rights)

http://teachingamericanhistory.org/library/document/albany-plan-of-union/ (Albany Plan of Union)

http://teachingamericanhistory.org/library/document/the-rights-of-the-colonies-examined/ (The Rights of Colonies Examined, Stephen Hopkins, 1764)

http://www.landofthebrave.info/colonial-society.htm (Colonial Society)

http://avalon.law.yale.edu/subject_menus/statech.asp - (Colonial charters and documents for the colonies)

http://www.readwritethink.org/classroom-resources/student-interactives/printing-press-30036.html (Brochure template)



Student Resources:

http://www.landofthebrave.info/colonial-society.htm (Colonial Society)

http://www.history.org/almanack/life/classes.cfm (“Colonial Social Classes” at Colonial Williamsburg)

http://www.usahistory.info/colonial/population.html (Article: Colonial population and social rank)

http://www.readwritethink.org/classroom-resources/student-interactives/printing-press-30036.html (Brochure template)






Assessment:

Students will create a brochure inviting new Englishmen and women to the English colonies. In their brochure they will highlight the political, social and cultural similarities to Britain in order to attract more colonists. (CCSS.ELA-Literacy.WHST.6-8.4)

Differentiation:

(Multiple means for students to access content and multiple modes for student to express understanding.)



Access (Resources and/or Process)

Expression (Products and/or Performance)

N/A

Students may create a flyer highlight general similarities to Britain

Extensions for depth and complexity:

Access (Resources and/or Process)

Expression (Products and/or Performance)

N/A

Students may include additional primary source images in their brochure

Critical Content:

  • The colonies were chartered by authorization of the King, but self-governing

  • The idea of salutary neglect which allowed long term self-governance

  • The colonists were English and expected basic English rights as outlined in the English Bill of Rights

  • The colonies grew and developed class structures based on economic and political means

  • The ideas that are critical to understanding representative democracy and monarchy

Key Skills:

  • Compare and contrast similarities and differences between life in the colonies and life in Britain

  • Determine the central ideas of a primary/secondary source

Critical Language:

Social mobility, growth (economic and political), roles (gender, social, and political), rights (individual and lawful), ruling powers, monarchy, English Bill of Rights, subject, rights and responsibilities, nation, country, Parliament, salutary neglect, representative democracy, self-governing, charter(ed), class structure
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