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Instructional Unit Authors

Ellicott School District

Kelli Cabrera

Richard Campbell

Anja Centennial

Diane Garduno

Nathaniel Miller

Based on a curriculum overview Sample authored by

Archuleta School District

Scott White

Del Norte School District

Jill Martinez

Greeley School District

Therese Gilbert
Poudre School District

Gabrielle Wymore



This unit was authored by a team of Colorado educators. The template provided one example of unit design that enabled teacher-authors to organize possible learning experiences, resources, differentiation, and assessments. The unit is intended to support teachers, schools, and districts as they make their own local decisions around the best instructional plans and practices for all students.
Colorado’s District Sample Curriculum Project


date Posted: march 31, 2014

Social Studies

8th Grade



Colorado Teacher-Authored Instructional Unit Sample

Unit Title: From Subject to Citizen





Content Area

Social Studies

Grade Level

8th Grade

Course Name/Course Code

8th Grade Social Studies

Standard

Grade Level Expectations (GLE)

GLE Code

  1. History

  1. Formulate appropriate hypotheses about United States history based on a variety of historical sources and perspectives

SS09-GR.8-S.1-GLE.1

  1. The historical eras, individuals, groups, ideas and themes from the origins of the American Revolution through Reconstruction and their relationships with one another

SS09-GR.8-S.1-GLE.2

  1. Geography

  1. Use geographic tools to analyze patterns in human and physical systems

SS09-GR.8-S.2-GLE.1

  1. Conflict and cooperation occur over space and resources

SS09-GR.8-S.2-GLE.2

  1. Economics

  1. Economic freedom, including free trade, is important for economic growth

SS09-GR.8-S.3-GLE.1

  1. Manage personal credit and debt (PFL)

SS09-GR.8-S.3-GLE.2

  1. Civics

  1. Analyze elements of continuity and change in the United States government and the role of citizens over time

SS09-GR.8-S.4-GLE.1

  1. The place of law in a constitutional system

SS09-GR.8-S.4-GLE.2

Colorado 21st Century Skills




Critical Thinking and Reasoning: Thinking Deeply, Thinking Differently

Information Literacy: Untangling the Web

Collaboration: Working Together, Learning Together

Self-Direction: Own Your Learning

Invention: Creating Solutions

Reading & Writing Standards for Literacy

in History/Social Studies 6 - 12

Reading Standards

Writing Standards

  • Text Types & Purposes

  • Production and Distribution of Writing

  • Research to Construct and Present Knowledge

  • Range of Writing

Unit Titles

Length of Unit/Contact Hours

Unit Number/Sequence

Subject to Citizen

6-9 weeks

1



Unit Title

From Subject to Citizen

Length of Unit

6-9 weeks

Focusing Lens(es)

Power

Standards and Grade Level Expectations Addressed in this Unit

SS09-GR.8-S.1-GLE.1

SS09-GR.8-S.1-GLE.2

SS09-GR.8-S.2-GLE.1

SS09-GR.8-S.2-GLE.2



SS09-GR.8-S.3-GLE.1

SS09-GR.8-S.3-GLE.2

SS09-GR.8-S.4-GLE.1

SS09-GR.8-S.4-GLE.2



CCSS Reading Standards for Literacy in History/Social Studies 6-8

CCSS.RH.6-8.1, CCSS.RH.6-8.2, CCSS.RH.6-8.4, CCSS.RH.6-8.6, CCSS.RH.6-8.8

CCSS Writing Standards for Literacy in History/Social Studies 6-8

CCSS.WHST.6-8.1, CCSS.WHST.6-8.2, CCSS.WHST.6-8.4

Inquiry Questions (Engaging- Debatable):

  • What circumstances encourage people to challenge power and authority? (SS09-GR.8-S.1-GLE.2)

  • How are our contemporary ideas of citizenship inspired by the Declaration of Independence?

  • Why do governments use trade and exchange to control its citizenry?

  • What would the United States be like if England had won the American Revolution?

Unit Strands

History, Geography, Economics, Civics

Concepts

Primary and secondary sources, mercantilism, cause and effect, conflict, trade, debt, perspective, oppression, taxation, representation, rebellion, region, stability, economic independence, colonize(d), democracy, revolution, monarchy, self-determination, civil liberties




Generalizations

My students will Understand that…

Guiding Questions

Factual Conceptual

Increasingly oppressive forms of governance determine individual and/or group rights, roles, and responsibilities which may lead to rebellion (SS09-GR.8-S.1-GLE.2-EO.b,e,f) and (SS09-GR.8-S.4-GLE.1-EO.a,c; IQ.3)

How did taxation without representation lead to the colonial struggle for independence?

How do laws reflect beliefs about authority? (SS09-GR.8-S.4-GLE.2-EO.a,b)

What circumstances have led to revolutions?

How have some justified civil disobedience?


Colonized subjects’ efforts to increase self-determination often lead ruling powers toward increasingly oppressive policies and forms of governance (SS09-GR.8-S.1-GLE.2-EO.a,e) and (SS09-GR.8-S.4-GLE.1-EO.a,d)

How did British colonists react to the enforcement of England’s policies? (SS09-GR.8-S.4-GLE.1-EO.a)

What role did England’s debt from the French and Indian War play in taxing the colonists? (SS09-GR.8-S.3-GLE.2-EO.a)



How can a governmental policy be seen as oppressive by some and not by others? (SS09-GR.8-S.1-GLE.2-EO.a)

The strength and stability of a nation depends on the establishment and maintenance of economic independence, cultural traditions, and social institutions (SS09-GR.8-S.2-GLE.1-EO.a; IQ.1) and (SS09-GR.8-S.3-GLE.1-EO.a,d; IQ.2)

From the founding of the colonies to the American Revolution, what traditions and institutions created stability in the United States? Which led to instability?


How have differing perspectives regarding resource and land use led to cooperative policies or conflicts? (SS09-GR.8-S.1-GLE.1-EO.a) and (SS09-GR.8-S.2-GLE.1-EO.a; IQ.1)

The struggle to extend civil liberties often destabilizes economic, cultural, and social traditions/institutions leading to conflict and even war (SS09-GR.8-S.4-GLE.1-EO.a,b,f)

How did colonial efforts to maintain and/or extend the civil rights of the colonists contribute to the War for Independence?

How can the tension between societal needs and individual liberties be addressed?




Critical Content:

My students will Know

Key Skills:

My students will be able to (Do)

  • The ideas that are critical to understanding representative democracy and monarchy (SSO9-GR.8-S.1-GLE.2-EO.f)

  • The patterns and networks of economic interdependence in colonial America (SSO9-GR.8-S.2-GLE.1-EO.c)

  • How the establishment of human settlement patterns is determined by the physical attributes of the land (SSO9-GR.8-S.2-GLE.1-EO.d; IQ.1,2)

  • The Northern colonies had a comparative advantage (textiles) and the Southern colonies had an absolute advantage (tobacco) (SSO9-GR.8-S.3-GLE.1-EO.b)

  • England’s restrictive policies regarding trade, quotas, and tariffs as a way to control the colonies (SSO9-GR.8-S.3-GLE.1-EO.d)

  • The origins, outcomes, and significance of the American Revolution (SSO9-GR.8-S.1-GLE.2-EO.e)

  • Evaluate to what degree economic policies are driven by political events

  • Determine the central ideas of a primary/secondary source (SSO9-GR.8- S.1-GLE.1-EO.a)

  • Provide an accurate summary of a primary/secondary source, distinct from prior knowledge or opinions using evidence from the text (SSO9-GR.8- S.1-GLE.1-EO.d)

  • Recognize how regional perspectives affect cooperation and conflict (SSO9-GR.8- S.2-GLE.2-IQ.3)

  • Write an argument to support a claim that organizes reasons and evidence logically (SSO9-GR.8- S.1-GLE.1-EO.a)

  • Critique propaganda as a tool of influence (SSO9-GR.8- S.1-GLE.1-EO.c)







Critical Language: includes the Academic and Technical vocabulary, semantics, and discourse which are particular to and necessary for accessing a given discipline.

EXAMPLE: A student in Language Arts can demonstrate the ability to apply and comprehend critical language through the following statement: “Mark Twain exposes the hypocrisy of slavery through the use of satire.”



A student in ______________ can demonstrate the ability to apply and comprehend critical language through the following statement(s):

The causes and effects of taxation without representation led to a shift of power that established a different interpretation of citizenship.

Academic Vocabulary:

Cause and effect, multiple perspectives, inquiry

Technical Vocabulary:

Democracy, mercantilism, revolution, quota, tariff, economic interdependence, comparative and absolute advantage, monarchy, self-determination, civil liberties, primary and secondary sources, trade, debt, oppression, taxation, representation, rebellion, region, stability, economic independence, colonize(d)




Unit Description:

This unit focuses on the era from English colonization in the United States through the American Revolution to independence. The unit begins with a review of the economic and political benefits of colonialism in British North America. Students will analyze the political, social, and economic circumstances of the Colonies prior to the French and Indian War. The focus of the unit then moves to the increasingly oppressive policies of the British Crown on the colonies and the colonists’ efforts to increase self-determination and continue self-governance. Students continue an analysis of the forms of rebellion used by the colonists against the British Crown, ultimately ending in revolution, which left the new nation with new challenges. The culminating performance assessment has students investigating various perspectives and reactions to the rebellious acts of the colonists in the form of creating a documentary segment for the History Channel.

Considerations:

The authors of this unit decided to set the stage with students comprehending the political, social and economic realities in the colonies as British subjects (LE #1-3). This builds a foundation for the understanding that the colonies develop their own identity, subsequently fueling their reactions to Britain’s strict policies (LE #4-8) which ultimately leads to the Revolution (LE #9-10). The unit is primarily chronological and authors decided to put an emphasis on students using primary sources to build their knowledge about this time period. An excellent source for primary source documents is: Morgan, E. (1959).  Prologue to Revolution: Sources and Documents on the Stamp Act Crisis, 1764-1766.

Unit Generalizations

Key Generalization:

The struggle to extend civil liberties often destabilizes economic, cultural, and social traditions/institutions leading to conflict and even war

Supporting Generalizations:

Increasingly oppressive forms of governance determine individual and/or group rights, roles, and responsibilities which may lead to rebellion

Colonized subjects’ efforts to increase self-determination often lead ruling powers toward increasingly oppressive policies and forms of governance

The strength and stability of a nation depends on the establishment and maintenance of economic independence, cultural traditions, and social institutions




Performance Assessment: The capstone/summative assessment for this unit.

Claims:

(Key generalization(s) to be mastered and demonstrated through the capstone assessment.)



The struggle to extend civil liberties often destabilizes economic, cultural, and social traditions/institutions leading to conflict and even war

Stimulus Material:

(Engaging scenario that includes role, audience, goal/outcome and explicitly connects the key generalization)



The History Channel is holding a contest to recognize the 240th anniversary of the start of the American War of Independence. You are a member of an investigative team tasked with creating a segment for a documentary that highlights the struggles of colonists in their efforts to achieve fairness as British subjects and the efforts of the British Crown to maintain control over its colonies. Your team’s segment should be an in-depth examination of one specific issue or event (e.g., the Intolerable Acts, the Boston Massacre, Common Sense) which incorporates various perspectives and reactions of the groups involved.

Product/Evidence:

(Expected product from students)



Students will create a documentary segment highlighting one issue or event that illustrates the colonists’ attempts to increase their self-determination and the subsequent British response to those attempts. Students may work in teams of three or four to create a 7-10 minute documentary segment using a program such as iMovie or Movie Maker.

Student teams should write a narrative for their segment that includes:



  • factual information about the event/issue,

  • multiple perspectives (to include patriots, loyalists, and British government officials), and

  • the actions and reactions to the event or issue

Students should also include primary sources in the documentary segment (e.g., maps, documents, illustrations) and secondary sources (e.g., music, video, film clips, staged re-enactments) which support the narrative.

This assessment will necessitate the creation of a rubric with a set of criteria to determine the degree to which a student's performance meets the expectations of the summative/capstone assessment. Here is an overview of the steps in developing a performance assessment rubric.

Differentiation:

(Multiple modes for student expression)



Teacher may create teams based on ability and/or by assigning a specific issue or event. Teacher may also assign specific roles within teams based on ability (e.g., video editor, narrator). Teacher may provide specific sources for groups to include in the documentary, as appropriate.




Texts for independent reading or for class read aloud to support the content

Informational/Non-Fiction

Fiction

Bohannon, L. (2004). The American Revolution. Lexile: 1050

Burgan, M. (2005).  The Stamp Act of 1765.  Lexile: 1000

Collier, J. (1998).  The French and Indian War: 1660-1763.  Lexile: 1120

Greene, J. (?).  Pursuit of Happiness: The Social Development of Early Modern British Colonies and the Formation of American Culture.  Lexile 1350

Meltzer, M. (1993). The American Revolutionaries: A History in Their Own Words. Lexile 1220

Ransom, C. (2011). What Was the Continental Congress? Lexile 780

Reisfeld, R. (2015) The Causes of the American Revolution.  Lexile: 1170

Schanzer, R. (2004).  George vs. George: The American Revolution as Seen from Both Sides. Lexile: 1120



Blackwood, G. (2002). The Year of the Hangman. Lexile: 820  

Collier, J. & Collier, C. (1974). My brother Sam is dead. Lexile 770

Elliott, L. (2006). Give Me Liberty. Lexile: 810

Fast, H. (1961). April Morning. Lexile: 1050

Forbes, E. (1971). Johnny Tremain. Lexile 840

Fritz, J. (1996). Why Don’t You Get a Horse, Sam Adams? Lexile 800

Fritz, J. (1981). Traitor: The Case of Benedict Arnold. Lexile 1020

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