Indian cultural profile



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INDIAN CULTURAL PROFILE

One of the most striking features about India, which any foreign traveler must appreciate, is the size and diversity of this country. Given its vastness and variety, there is no single way to understand India. In fact, one observer once commented that 'India as a nation exists only in the minds of its population.' Many travelers find India unpredictable and confusing because they fail to grasp this point.



Values and beliefs: India’s values revolve around a strong family orientation as well as loyalty to a ‘group’ which often has to do with their profession. It is important to do well in business and creativity is admired, especially in adversity.

Business etiquettes



  • Self-image: Indians see themselves as great humanists and arbitrators. They believe that they bridge East and West.

  • Negotiating characteristics: Basically the Indian, is disappointed if you do not engage in bargaining with him. As far as negotiating style is concerned, the Indian has few superiors.

Communication patterns:

  • Communication is invariably courteous in the extreme with lengthy and amiable small talk preceding getting down to business.

  • When business is ultimately discussed, the reactive side of Indians’ nature is revealed in their request to hear the other side’s view first.

  • How to empathize with them: Indians emanate and expect warmth, respect and properness.

  • It is risky to be too jovial with them – they tend to take things seriously.

  • Listening habits: The key to Indian attention is to be eloquent, humble and respectful. They are willing to listen at length, to enable a relationship to develop and their aim, in the subsequent feedback, is to make a friend of the speaker.

Dress code

Indian sari remains the traditional clothing of Indian women. Worn in varied styles, it is a long piece of flat cotton, silk or other fabric woven in different textures with different patterns. The sari has a lasting charm since it is not cut or tailored for a particular size. This graceful feminine attire can also be worn in several ways and its manner of wearing as well as its color and texture are indicative of the status, age, occupation, region and religion of a woman. The tightly fitted, short blouse worn under a sari is called a choli. The choli evolved as a form of Indian clothing around the tenth century AD and the first cholis were only front covering; the back was always bare.









Another popular attire of women in Indian clothing is the Indian salwar-kameez. This popular Indian dress evolved as a comfortable and respectable garment for women in Kashmir and Punjab region, but is now immensely popular in all regions of India. Salwars are pyjama-like trousers drawn tightly in at the waist and the ankles. Over the salwars, women wear a long and loose tunic known as a kameez. One might occasionally come across women wearing a churidar instead of a salwar. A churidar is similar to the salwar but is tighter fitting at the hips, thighs and ankles. Over this, one might wear a collarless or mandarin-collar tunic called a kurta.

However, more and more women are taking to the western suits – western trousers with tops and jackets as well as skirts with tops and jackets – in the metros of India. This dress code is seen more prominently in the MNCs and the BPO sector.

INDIAN CLOTHING FOR MEN:

Though the majority of Indian women wear traditional costumes, the men in India can be found in more conventional men's western clothing. Shirts and trousers are worn by men from all regions in India. However, men in villages are still more comfortable in traditional Indian kurta. The men wear Sherwani, Lungi, Dhoti, Kurta pajama, and churidars.






Lungi Kurta pajama Sherwani

Why women in business

Women have proved better corporate governance in India, because of their "more conscientious approach towards work, the induction of different judgment and values, disciplined boardroom behavior and sensitivity to issues such as business ethics, community and environmental concerns."

India is the world's second largest producer of food next to China, and has the potential of being the biggest with the food and agricultural sector. In this respect, the country is endowed with a large production base for a variety of raw materials covering food crops, commercial crops and fibers due to its varied agro-climatic conditions. Few women are landowners and agriculturists but many of them work as farm hands on daily wages in the rural sector.

ENTERTAINMENT

Indian media and entertainment industry has an estimated size of US$ 7.72 billion and is expected to reach US$ 18.32 billion by 2010 with CAGR of 19 per cent.



  • Maximum growth is expected in television and film segments

  • More than 300 national and regional TV channels

  • Close to 1000 films made every year

  • Liberal FDI policies across all the segments of the industry

  • Government focusing on regulations to give further impetus to the industry

Food Habits

India is the world's second largest producer of food next to China, and has the potential of being the biggest in the food and agricultural sector. In this respect, the country is endowed with a large production base for a variety of raw materials covering food crops, commercial crops and fibers due to its varied agro-climatic conditions.

Some of the popular cuisines of India are Mughlai, Hyderabadi, South Indian, Bengali, Punjabi, Gujrathi, Rajasthani, Awadhi, Maharashtrian etc

Cuisines and dishes that are popular with foreigners visiting India are Chicken and Paneer Tikkas, Biriyani, Currys to name a few.



BY:

Shilpi, Amaan, Rishi, Varsha & Garima





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