Indexes of Integrated Assessment Practice with Correlations to Florida’s Sunshine State Standards



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Contents

Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1

Indexes of Integrated Assessment Practice with Correlations to Florida’s Sunshine State Standards . . . . .3

FCAT Questions in the Reading Strategies Resource . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . .3 Guided Writing Lessons . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .8



Test-Taking Skills Practice Worksheets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .10

Preparing for Tests . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . .10 Strategies for Taking Standardized Tests . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .11 Taking Objective Tests . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .12 Reading Comprehension Questions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . .14



FCAT Practice Tests, Grade 10 Unit 1 Test

from “Aztec Myth: ‘Popocatépetl and Ixtacihauatl’” Reading . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . .17 Writing (Persuasive) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .22



Unit 2 Test

“Musical Adaptation of the Kalevala Presented at Guthrie Theater Lab” Reading . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . .23 Writing (Expository) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .27



Unit 3 Test

from “The Necklace” Reading . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . .28 Writing (Persuasive) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .32



Unit 4 Test

from The Tragedy of Julius Cæsar Reading . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . .33 Writing (Expository) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .37



Unit 5 Test

from “The United Nations Essay Contest” Reading . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . .38 Writing (Persuasive) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .41



Unit 6 Test

The 21st Century: A Literary Magazine Written by Teens for Teens” Reading . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . .42 Writing (Persuasive) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .46



Unit 7 Test

“Theodore Roethke” Reading . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . .47 Writing (Expository) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .50



Unit 8 Test

“The Rules of Chess” Reading . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . .51 Writing (Expository) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .56



Unit 9 Test

“The Story behind ‘1910’” Reading . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . .57 Writing (Persuasive) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .60



Unit 10 Test

“Background Information for When Heaven and Earth Changed Places” Reading . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . .61 Writing (Expository) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .64



Unit 11 Test

from Antigone Reading . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . .65 Writing (Persuasive) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .68



Unit 12 Test

“Magical Realism” Reading . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . .69 Writing (Expository) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .73




UNIT 1—THE ORAL TRADITION

Magic Words,” page 6

Question Type: Multiple Choice

Standardized Test Practice: Identify Author’s Purpose and Tone

Florida Benchmark L.A.A.2.4.2, L.A.E.2.4.1

from The Greek Myths: “The Five Ages of Man” and “Orpheus,” page 10

Question Type: Performance Tasks Standardized Test Practice: Compare and Contrast Florida Benchmark LA.A.2.2.7



from the Popol Vuh, page 16

Question Type: Multiple Choice

Standardized Test Practice: Recognize Cause and Effect

Florida Benchmark LA.E.2.2.1

Popocatépetl and Ixtacihuatl,” page 23

Question Type: Multiple Choice

Standardized Test Practice: Identify Conflict and Resolution

Florida Benchmark LA.E.2.4.1



from King Arthur and His Knights of the Round Table, page 32

Question Type: Performance Tasks

Standardized Test Practice: Analyze Character Development

Florida Benchmark LA.E.2.4.1



from Le Morte d’Arthur, page 45

Question Type: Multiple Choice

Standardized Test Practice: Identify Sequence of Events

Florida Benchmark LA.E.2.4.1

Sundiata Keita, the Legend and the King,” page 54

Question Type: Multiple Choice Standardized Test Practice: Identify Author’s Purpose Florida Benchmark LA.A.2.4.2



UNIT 2—POETRY

36. In late-afternoon light the tops of the breadfruit leaves,” page 78

Question Type: Multiple Choice Standardized Test Practice: Identify Author’s Purpose Florida Benchmark LA.A.2.4.2

The Bean Eaters,” page 83

Question Type: Multiple Choice Standardized Test Practice: Identify Theme and Tone Florida Benchmark LA.E.2.4.1

Dream Variations,” page 88

Question Type: Multiple Choice Standardized Test Practice: Identify Mood and Tone Florida Benchmark LA.E.2.4.1

The Dance,” page 92

Question Type: Performance Tasks Standardized Test Practice: Compare and Contrast Texts Florida Benchmark LA.A.2.2.7

Ars Poetica,” page 96

Question Type: Multiple Choice Standardized Test Practice: Identify Main Idea Florida Benchmark LA.A.2.4.1

Poetry,” page 101

Question Type: Multiple Choice Standardized Test Practice: Unlock Words in Context Florida Benchmark LA.A.1.4.2

The Gazelle,” page 106

Question Type: Multiple Choice Standardized Test Practice: Compare and Contrast Ideas Florida Benchmark LA.A.2.2.7


Test–Taking Skills Practice Worksheets

PREPARING FOR TESTS

Tests like the FCAT and other standardized tests are a common part of school life. These guidelines will help you prepare for a variety of tests.



TEST-TAKING TIPS

Preparing for a Test • Pay attention in class. Exercises and activities throughout the year practice skills that will benefit you on standardized tests. • Know what to expect. Your teacher can provide you with information about the tests you will be taking. You can also print out and read the publication Keys to FCAT for grades 9 and 10 by going to http:// www.firn.edu/doe/sas/fcat/pdf/fckey90e.pdf. • Get plenty of sleep the night before the test and eat a healthy breakfast in the morning. • Arrive on time. Running late can raise your stress level and hurt your performance.

Taking a Test • Read directions and questions carefully. • Consider every choice. Don’t be fooled by distractors, or answers that are almost correct. • Spend test time wisely. Within each section, answer the easiest questions first and come back to the more difficult questions later. • Make sure to record your answer on the correct line of the answer sheet. As you mark each answer, ask yourself “Am I on the right ques­tion number in the right section of the test?” and “Is this the answer I mean to mark?” • Use any extra time to check your work.


EXERCISE Test-Taking Strategies

Write a brief response to each set of suggestions above. Do you use these strategies now? Which would help you most on your next test?



  1. Preparing for a test

  2. Taking a test


STRATEGIES FOR TAKING STANDARDIZED TESTS

A standardized test measures overall ability, or achievement over a period of time. On standardized tests, answers are recorded in a special format because they are scored by computer. You mark your answers on a separate answer sheet by blacking in a small circle under the option you have chosen. The computer then scans these marks to record the number of correct answers. To make sure your answers are scanned accurately, be sure to fill in all circles solidly.

When selecting answers on a standardized test, keep these points in mind:


  • If you do not know the answer, try to rule out some choices and then guess from those remaining.

  • If a question seems too difficult, skip it and go back to it later. Keep in mind, though, that most tests allow you to go back only to questions within a section.


EXERCISE

Taking Standardized Tests

Read or reread Elements of the Oral Tradition on page 4 of your textbook. Then circle the letter that cor­responds to the best answer to each question below.

1. Which of the following statements is true? A B CD

A. A fairy tale is always a folk tale.

B. A folk tale is always a fairy tale.

C. A tall tale is another name for a fairy tale.

D. A tall tale is another name for a folk tale.

2. “You can lead a horse to water, but you can’t make it drink” A B CD is an example of a

A. myth

B. fable

C. folk tale

D. ballad

3. Religious songs from the African-American folk tradition are also called A B CD

A. spirituals

B. ballads

C. sonatas

D. arias

4. Short stories that illustrate a moral or spiritual truth and that A B CD are often found in religious writings are called

A. fables

B. anecdotes

C. parables

D. riddles



TAKING OBJECTIVE TESTS

Objective test questions have a single correct answer. On standardized tests, most objective questions are multiple choice. The guidelines below will help you answer these kinds of questions effectively.



TIPS FOR ANSWERING MULTIPLE-CHOICE QUESTIONS

Read each question carefully. Pay special attention to any words that are bolded, italicized, written in all capital letters, or otherwise emphasized.

Read all choices before deciding on the answer.

Beware of distractors, or incorrect answers that look attractive because they are partially correct, they contain a common misconception, or they apply the right information in the wrong way. Distractors are based on common mistakes students make.

Rule out incorrect answers; then choose the answer that is most accurate or complete. Pay special attention to choices such as none of the above or all of the above.

EXERCISE

Turn to page 611 of your textbook, and read the Reader’s Resource feature on the allusion to Madame Butterfly and the About the Author feature on Sandra Cisneros. Then answer the following questions.

1. Madame Butterfly is a(n)

A. novel by Sandra Cisneros

B. opera by Wagner

C. opera by Puccini

D. sonnet by Shakespeare

2. The main conflict in Madame Butterfly is

A. between two lovers, a Japanese woman and an American man

B. internal, within an American naval lieutenant

C. between Sandra Cisneros and Giacomo Puccini

D. between two lovers, a Japanese man and an American woman

3. The purpose of these two sections is MOST LIKELY to

A. persuade the reader to learn more about Madame Butterfly

B. entertain the reader with interesting stories about opera and writing

C. inform the reader about background useful in understanding a story by Sandra Cisneros

D. inspire the reader to go the opera

4. A figure of speech that makes reference to a person, event, object, or work from history or literature is called a(n)

A. character

B. simile

C. allusion

D. opera

5. Cisneros’s accomplishments include all of the following EXCEPT

A. writing a novel, short stories, and poetry

B. infusing feminism with the perspective of Chicana women

C. following in a long tradition of celebrated Hispanic women writers

D. writing about issues she herself has experienced

READING COMPREHENSION QUESTIONS

Reading comprehension questions ask you to read a short piece of writing and answer several questions about it. To answer reading comprehension questions, follow these steps:


  1. Read through all the questions quickly.

  2. Read the passage with the questions in mind.

  3. Reread the first question carefully.

  4. Scan the passage to look for key words related to the question. When you find a key word, slow down and read carefully.

  5. Answer the question.

  6. Repeat this process to answer the rest of the questions.


EXERCISE

Answering Reading Comprehension Questions

Read the following excerpt from Chief Seattle’s speech “Yonder sky that has wept tears of compas­sion…” (from page 434 of your textbook). Then, for each question that follows the passage, select the letter that corresponds to the best answer.

There was a time when our people covered the land as the waves of a wind-ruffled sea cover its shell-paved floor, but that time long since passed away with the greatness of tribes that are now but a mournful memory. I will not dwell on, nor mourn over, our untimely decay, nor reproach my paleface brothers with hastening it as we too may have been somewhat to blame.

Youth is impulsive. When our young men grow angry at some real or imaginary wrong, and disfigure their faces with black paint, it denotes that their hearts are black, and that they are often cruel and relentless, and our old men and old women are unable to restrain them. Thus it has ever been. Thus it was when the white man first began to push our forefathers westward. But let us hope that the hostilities between us may never return. We would have everything to lose and nothing to gain. Revenge by young men is considered gain, even at the cost of their own lives, but old men who stay at home in times of war, and mothers who have sons to lose, know better.

1. As it is used in this selection, the word impulsive most likely means

A. imaginative

B. hyperactive

C. without reflection

D. careful

2. To what does Chief Seattle compare his people’s former presence on the land?

A. to ants on an anthill

B. to blackened hearts

C. to decaying corpses

D. to the sea on a windy day

3. According to Chief Seattle, young men are often

A. hateful

B. cruel and relentless

C. wise and slow to action

D. all the same

4. Chief Seattle’s attitude toward the decline of his people could BEST be described as

A. angry and vengeful

B. mournful

C. resigned

D. frightened

5. Which of the following statements expresses Chief Seattle’s view on revenge?

A. It seems glorious to the young, but older people know better.

B. It is justified by the acts of the white men.

C. It is cruel and relentless.

D. It is foolish.
FCAT Practice, Grade 10

UNIT 1 TEST

READING DIRECTIONS

Read the passage below. Then read each question that follows the passage. For Multiple-Choice Items, decide which is the best answer to each question. Mark the letter for that answer. For Read, Think, and Explain Performance Tasks, write your responses to the questions in the space provided.

Aztec Myth: ‘Popocatépetl and Ixtacihuatl’”

“Popocatépetl and Ixtacihuatl” is an Aztec myth. A myth is a story that explains objects or events in the natural world as resulting from the action of some supernatural force or entity, most often a god.

“Popocatépetl and Ixtacihuatl” takes place in and around the Aztec capital of Tenochtitlan. In this myth, an aging emperor is preparing his only daughter, Ixtacihuatl, to rule after his death. Trusting only his heir to succeed him on the throne, the Emperor forbids her to marry her lover Popocatépetl, displaying a shortsightedness that causes many of his subjects to doubt his wisdom. The Emperor focuses so much of his attention on educating his daughter that he neglects matters of state, and peo­ple begin to consider the empire to be weak. Soon, enemy tribes mount an attack on the Emperor’s domain. Finally, the Emperor issues the following challenge: The warrior who can lead the Emperor’s forces to a victory over their enemies will be allowed to marry Ixtacihuatl and rule alongside her. The warriors go forth, and, after a long and bloody battle, vanquish their enemies. All recognize that Popocatépetl was responsible for the victory and predict a happy future for Popocatépetl and Ixtacihuatl. Read the following retelling of the rest of the myth to see how these plans go awry:

Popocatépetl and Ixtacihuatl” Retold by Julie Piggott

But a few of those warriors were jealous of Popo. Since they knew none of them could rightly claim the victory for himself (the decision among the Emperor’s fighting men that Popo was responsible for the victory had been unanimous), they wanted to spoil for him and for Ixta the delights which the Emperor had promised. These few men slipped away from the rest at night and made their way to Tenochtitlan ahead of all the others. They reached the capital two days later, having traveled without sleep all the way, and quickly let it be known that, although the Emperor’s warriors had been successful against his enemies, the warrior Popo had been killed in battle.

It was a foolish and cruel lie which those warriors told their Emperor, and they told it for no reason other than that they were jealous of Popo.

When the Emperor heard this, he demanded that Popo’s body be brought to him so that he might arrange a fitting burial. He knew the man his daughter had loved would have died courageously. The jealous warriors looked at one another and said nothing. Then one of them told the Emperor that Popo had been killed on the edge of Lake Texcoco and that his body had fallen into the water and no man had been able to retrieve it. The Emperor was saddened to hear this.

After a little while, he demanded to be told which of his warriors had been responsible for the victory; but none of the fighting men before him dared claim the successful outcome of the war for himself, for each knew the others would refute him. So they were silent. This puzzled the Emperor, and he decided to wait for the main body of his warriors to return and not to press the few who had brought the news of the victory and of Popo’s death.

Then the Emperor sent for his wife and his daughter and told them their enemies had been

overcome. The Empress was thoroughly excited and relieved at the news. Ixta was only apprehensive.

The Emperor, seeing her anxious face, told her quickly that Popo was dead. He went on to say that

the warrior’s body had been lost in the waters of Lake Texcoco; and again it was as though his wisdom

had left him, for he spoke at some length of his not yet being able to tell Ixta who her husband would

be and who would become Emperor when the main body of warriors returned to Tenochtitlan.

But Ixta heard nothing of what he told her, only that her beloved Popo was dead. She went to her

room and lay down. Her mother followed her and saw at once she was very ill. Witch doctors were

sent for, but they could not help the princess, and neither could her parents. Her illness had no

name, unless it was the illness of a broken heart. Princess Ixtacihuatl did not wish to live if

Popocatépetl was dead, and so she died herself.

The day after her death, Popo returned to Tenochtitlan with all the other surviving warriors.

They went straight to the palace and, with much cheering, told the Emperor that his enemies had

been routed and that Popo was the undoubted victor of the conflict.

The Emperor praised his warriors and pronounced Popo to be the new Emperor in his place.

When the young man asked first to see Ixta, begging that they should be married at once before

being jointly proclaimed Emperor and Empress, the Emperor had to tell Popo of Ixta’s death and

how it had happened.

Popo spoke not a word.

He gestured the assembled warriors to follow him, and together they sought out the few jealous

men who had given the false news of his death to the Emperor. With the army of warriors

watching, Popo killed each one of them in single combat with his obsidian studded club. No one

tried to stop him.

That task accomplished, Popo returned to the palace and, still without speaking and still wearing

his stiff cotton armor, went to Ixta’s room. He gently lifted her body and carried it out of the palace

and out of the city, and no one tried to stop him doing that either. All the warriors followed him in

silence.

When he had walked some miles, he gestured to them again, and they built a huge pile of stones

in the shape of a pyramid. They all worked together and they worked fast, while Popo stood and

watched, holding the body of the princess in his arms. By sunset the mighty edifice was finished.

Popo climbed it alone, carrying Ixta’s corpse with him. There, at the very top, under the heap of

stones, he buried the young woman he had loved so well and for so long and who had died for the

love of him.

That night Popo slept alone at the top of the pyramid by Ixta’s grave. In the morning he came

down and spoke for the first time since the Emperor had told him the princess was dead. He told

the warriors to build another pyramid, a little to the southeast of the one which held Ixta’s body,

and to build it higher than the other.

He told them, too, to tell the Emperor on his behalf that he, Popocatépetl, would never reign and

rule in Tenochtitlan. He would keep watch over the grave of the Princess Ixtacihuatl for the rest of

his life.

The messages to the Emperor were the last words Popo ever spoke. Well before the evening, the

second mighty pile of stones was built. Popo climbed it and stood at the top, taking a torch of

resinous pine wood with him.

And when he reached the top, he lit the torch, and the warriors below saw the white smoke rise

against the blue sky; and they watched as the sun began to set, and the smoke turned pink and then

a deep red, the color of blood.

So Popocatépetl stood there, holding the torch of memory of Ixtacihuatl, for the rest of his days.

The snows came, and, as the years went by, the pyramids of stone became high, white-capped

mountains. Even now the one called Popocatépetl emits smoke in memory of the princess whose

body lies in the mountain which bears her name.



MULTIPLE-CHOICE ITEMS

1. In this selection, the word vanquish means

A. vanish

B. defeat

C. succumb to

D. release

2. This selection is most like

F. Romeo and Juliet

G. Through the Looking Glass

H. “Little Red Riding Hood”

I. Casper, the Friendly Ghost

3. Which of the following is probably the Emperor’s BIGGEST mistake?

A. making Tenochtitlan the capital city

B. arranging for the most valiant warrior to marry his daughter

C. neglecting his own rule in order to prepare his daughter to rule

D. speaking at length about Ixta’s future husband

4. The author of this selection is

F. Julie Piggot

G. the Aztec people

H. Popocatépetl

I. Ixtacihuatl

5. If you were researching the Aztec idea of wise leadership, which of the following quotations would be most useful to you?

A. Since they knew none of them could rightly claim the victory for himself (the decision among the Emperor’s fighting men that Popo was responsible for the victory had been unanimous), they wanted to spoil for him and for Ixta the delights which the Emperor had promised.

B. In this myth, an aging emperor is preparing his only daughter, Ixtacihuatl, to rule after his death.

C. Then the Emperor sent for his wife and his daughter and told them their enemies had been overcome.

D. Trusting only his heir, the king forbids her to marry her lover Popocatépetl, displaying a short­sightedness that causes many of his subjects to doubt his wisdom.

6. This myth would BEST support an argument that

F. Popocatépetl was an important figure in Aztec history

G. The Aztecs worshipped the two mountains, Popocatépetl and Ixtacihuatl

H. Women were viewed as incompetent and unpredictable in Aztec society

I. the Aztecs recognized romantic love as a significant force

7. What did Popocatépetl do to express his grief at Ixtacihuatl’s death?

A. He turned her burial mound into a mountain.

B. He ruled the empire in her name.

C. He killed himself.

D. He overthrew the Emperor and his men.

8. This myth could best be described as

F. lighthearted

G. spiritual

H. tragic

I. comic

READ, THINK, AND EXPLAIN PERFORMANCE TASKS


  1. Who is the MOST to blame for the tragic fate of the two lovers? Why?

  2. A myth explains some natural phenomenon by attributing a supernatural cause for that phenomenon. Explain how “Popocatépetl and Ixtacihuatl” fits this definition.

FCAT Practice, Grade 10



UNIT 1 TEST

PERSUASIVE WRITING Writing Situation:

Student Council elections are approaching, and you or a good friend of yours would like to run for office. The first step in the process is to write an open letter to the school, announcing that one is running for office.



Directions for Writing:

Write an open letter to the school defining good leadership and proving that you or your chosen candidate fits that definition.


FCAT Practice, Grade 10

UNIT 2 TEST READING

DIRECTIONS

Read the passage below. Then read each question that follows the passage. For Multiple-Choice Items, decide which is the best answer to each question. Mark the letter for that answer. For Read, Think, and Explain Performance Tasks, write your responses to the questions in the space provided.

Musical Adaptation of the Kalevala Presented at Guthrie Theater Lab”



Ruth MacKenzie and cast in Kalevala: Dream of the Salmon Maiden. Photo by Ann Marsden.

In June of 1998 the Frank Theatre, the Guthrie Theater, and the Walker Art Center presented Kalevala: Dream of the Salmon Maiden, a musical adaptation of the Kalevala on the Guthrie Lab stage in Minneapolis, Minnesota. The production was written, composed, and adapted by Ruth MacKenzie, a singer, writer, and actor who has explored many creative and performing arenas.

“The first time I heard the vocal sounds of Finland and Sweden, I was hooked. I wanted to house these sounds within my own body,” MacKenzie said. In 1994, she studied in Finland and Sweden, as well as working at home experimenting with vocal sounds and “driving my dog nuts. As I learned more about these singing traditions, I wanted to put the songs within the context of a story because in the Finno-Ugrian tradition the singer is the storyteller. The singer is the magician.”

In the musical production, three vocalists sing the story of Aino from the Kalevala, as it is dramatized by interpretive dancers. MacKenzie interprets the story as “honoring the untamable within each of us.” In this section of the Kalevala the young maiden Aino eludes the advances of Väinämöinen, a 900-year-old magician, by transforming herself into a salmon in search of her own truth. MacKenzie decided on this story because she felt it resonated with her own path. “Just as Aino, I was going about my business when fate intervened (a concert in Kaustinen, Finland), setting me on a path that has been unpredictable and transformative.”

The production was directed by Wendy Knox and choreographed by Wynn Fricke. The presentation

included kulning (a high-pitched Swedish song for calling animals), Ingrian Choral work, Itku Virsi

(crying hymns), and trallning (Swedish cat singing). In order to communicate the story of Aino,

MacKenzie decided to sing in both Finnish and English. She used traditional Finnish and Swedish

melodies and created new melodies inspired by the tradition. MacKenzie integrated Finnish text with

English text so that audiences could hear the original language as well as the poetry that is part of this

tradition. “I’ve taken the original Kalevala text and interwoven poems from other Finno-Ugrian song

lyric sources to broaden the emotional and metaphysical landscape from which the story is told. But

truly at the heart of this work is the voice, the untamed voice.”

MacKenzie received a 1995 Fellowship grant from the Minnesota State Arts Board for her

performance work of Scandinavian and Finno-Ugrian singing styles, a 1996 Diverse Visions Grant

from Intermedia Arts, and a 1994 Jerome Foundation Travel/Study grant. She was awarded Artist of

the Year in 1997 by both the Minneapolis Star Tribune and City Pages newspapers for her production

of Kalevala, Dream of the Salmon Maiden. A compact disk recording of the performance is also

available from Omnium. For more information and to listen to the audio recording visit the website at

http://www.omnium.com/kalevala/.

MULTIPLE-CHOICE ITEMS

1. What is the meaning of the word house as used in this sentence?



I wanted to house these sounds within my own body.

A. dwelling

B. contain

C. governing body

D. safe place

2. Why did Ruth MacKenzie MOST want to produce the Kalevala?

F. She loved its original music.

G. She identified with the main character.

H. She had studied it in Finland.

I. She could get grant money to support it.

3. Which of the following details would be MOST important to include when summarizing this selection for someone who might want to attend the performance?

A. The production was sponsored by the Frank Theater, the Guthrie Theater, and the Walker Art Center.

B. Three vocalists sing while dancers interpret the storyline.

C. MacKenzie studied in Finland and Sweden in 1994.

D. MacKenzie is a singer, a writer, and an actor.

4. The author MOST LIKELY wrote this article to

F. explain Ruth MacKenzie’s background and interests

G. fulfill a course requirement

H. encourage readers to go to the production

I. entertain readers with the story of the Kalevala

5. Judging by this article, Finnish and Swedish singing are MOST LIKELY

A. rapid and harmonic

B. urgent and powerful

C. raplike and controversial

D. high-pitched and mournful

6. Which of the following details provides the BEST evidence that this production of the Kalevala is worth seeing?

F. the Best Artist award from City Pages and the Minneapolis Star Tribune

G. the 1995 Fellowship grant from the Minnesota State Arts Board

H. the 1994 travel grant from the Jerome Foundation

I. the availability of a compact disk recording of the performance

7. Which of the following words BEST applies to the theme of the Kalevala as it is described in this article?

A. Finland

B. untameable

C. Aino

D. Salmon Maiden

8. When MacKenzie says that, in the Finno-Ugrian tradition, the singer is a magician, she means that

F. the singer performs magic tricks while singing

G. the performance of a Finnish singer is magical

H. stories of magical events are common in Finland

I. the singer has a unique ability to bring a story to life



READ, THINK, AND EXPLAIN PERFORMANCE TASKS

  1. Describe what this production of the Kalevala was PROBABLY like. Use details from the article in your answer.

  2. What changes did Ruth MacKenzie make to the Kalevala in this production of it?

FCAT Practice, Grade 10



UNIT 2 TEST

EXPOSITORY WRITING Writing Situation:

Ruth MacKenzie feels that a fateful event influenced the course of her life. Such events can be large or small, and they can involve internal shifts (a significant dream, a sudden passion) or external happenings (a move to a new house, losing a friend).



Directions for Writing:

Think of an event that has influenced the direction of your life so far.



Now explain the nature of that event and how it has influenced your life.


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