Illinois Social Science Assessment Framework Grades 5, 8, and 11 Illinois State Board of Education



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Illinois Social Science Assessment Framework
Grades 5, 8, and 11


Illinois State Board of Education

September 2007



Introduction to the Illinois Social Science Assessment Framework
Grades 5, 8, and 11

The Illinois Social Science Assessment Framework is designed to assist educators, test developers, policy makers and the public by clearly defining those elements of the Illinois Learning Standards that are suitable for testing.


The Illinois Assessment Framework provides:


  • Clarity for students, parents and teachers regarding the knowledge and skills that are measurable on large-scale tests;

  • Focus on core content, without encouraging excessive narrowing of curriculum or instruction; and

  • Thorough coverage of each subject domain, as opposed to just providing sample benchmarks.



Assessment Objectives
The Framework contains assessment objectives, clear and concise statements of testable material at each grade level. Each assessment objective was derived from the Illinois Learning Standards and Benchmarks, for each grade level, posted on the Illinois State Board of Education Web site (www.isbe.net/ils).

Cognitive Complexity
“Cognitive complexity” refers to the level of reasoning called for by an assessment objective. For example, some assessment objectives require simple recall, while others may require more complex levels of reasoning and/or application of knowledge and skills. In Social Science the nature of the content is such that the cognitive complexity implied by each assessment objective can vary widely. For example, in Social Science a student may be asked to simply recall a given historical fact or may be asked to apply the skills of historical analysis to the same content. Thus, within the Framework for Social Science, separate tables indicate the proportion of test items that address different levels of reasoning.
Framework Conventions

This document uses a number of conventions, including symbols, abbreviations and a general organizational structure designed for ease of use. Each social science assessment objective has a unique identifier with three components.


Example: 14.5.01

14

5

01

State Goal

Grade Level

Objective Number

The first component, “14,” indicates the numbered State Learning Goal as defined in the Illinois Learning Standards. The second component, “5,” indicates the grade level. The third component, “01,” indicates that this is the first assessment objective for this goal at this grade level.

Social Science Content Category Table





Grade

5

8

11

Goal 14 – Political Systems

17%

17%

17%

U.S. Government (Standard A)

3%

4%

2%

Political Systems (Standard B)

4%

3%

3%

Election Processes and Citizen Responsibilities (Standard C)

3%

3%

3%

Roles of Individuals and Interest Groups (Standard D)

2%

3%

3%

U.S. Foreign Policy (Standard E)

2%

2%

3%

U.S. Political Ideas and Traditions (Standard F)

3%

2%

3%

(Illinois Political Systems embedded in Standards A–D, F)

(4%)

(2%)

(2%)

Goal 15 – Economics

15%

17%

17%

Economic Systems (Standard A)

3%

3%

3%

Scarcity and Consumers (Standard B)

3%

3%

3%

Scarcity and Producers (Standard C)

3%

3%

3%

Trade (Standard D)

3%

4%

4%

Government and the Economy (Standard E)

3%

4%

4%

(Illinois Economic Systems embedded in Standards A–E)

(3%)

(2%)

(1%)

Goal 16 – History

50%

48%

48%

Historical Analysis and Interpretation (Standard A)

See Item Thinking Scale Table

U.S. History (Standards B–D)

40%

29%

24%

World History (Standards B–D)

10%

19%

24%

Environmental History (embedded in Standards B–D)

(3%)

(3%)

(2%)

Illinois History: Events, Trends, and Individuals

(embedded in Standards B–D)



(4%)

(2%)

(2%)

Goal 17 – Geography

18%

18%

18%

Places, Regions, and Features on the Earth (Standard A)

5%

4%

5%

Earth's Physical Systems (Standard B)

4%

5%

3%

Geography and Society (Standard C)

5%

5%

5%

Geography and History (Standard D)

4%

4%

5%

Illinois Geography (embedded in Standards A–D)

(4%)

(2%)

(2%)

Goal 18 – Culture and Society

Distributed throughout the other goals

Culture

Individuals and Groups in Society

Development of Social Systems

Social Systems in Illinois

Total

100%

100%

100%

Social Science Reporting Category Table

Results should be reported out for each category.



Grade

5

8

11

Goal 14 – Political Systems

17%

17%

17%

Goal 15 – Economics

15%

17%

17%

Goal 16 – History

50%

48%

48%

U.S. History (Standards B-D)

40%

29%

24%

World History (Standards B-D)

10%

19%

24%

Goal 17 – Geography

18%

18%

18%

Illinois Political and Economic Systems, History and Geography

(embedded in other content categories)



(15%)







Total

100%

100%

100%

Social Science Item Thinking Scale Table

Grade

5

8

11

Level 1 Questions

Recalling Terms/Conventions

(e.g., definitions of primary/secondary sources; geographic terms such as compass rose; economic terms; chronological terms)


10%

10%

10%

Level 2 Questions

Recalling Facts and Concepts












Recalling facts, events, and characteristics

15%

15%

15%

Recalling concepts/theories (e.g. causal interpretations of the Civil War; supply and demand; popular sovereignty; special patterns of settlement)

25%

25%

25%

Level 3 Questions

Using and interpreting maps, graphs, charts, and tables



10%

10%

10%

Level 4 Questions

Using and interpreting symbols, illustrations, and cartoons



5%

5%

5%

Level 5 Questions

Distinguishing fact from opinion, relevant from irrelevant information, and establishing credibility of sources



15%

15%

15%

Level 6 Questions

Problem Solving (interpretation/generalization)



Forming hypotheses/research questions; determining relevance or significance of historical facts for or against a particular interpretation; drawing/evaluating conclusions; forming generalizations

20%

20%

20%

Total

100%

100%

100%

Social Science1 – Goal 14

Grade 5

Grade 8

Grade 11

U.S. GOVERNMENT (STANDARD A)

3%

4%

2%

14.5.01 Identify the basic principles of American democracy expressed in the Declaration of Independence, the U.S. Constitution, the Bill of Rights and the Illinois State Constitution, including: freedom, individual rights and obligations of citizens, consent of the governed, the common good, and trial by jury.

14.8.01 Identify the basic principles of American democracy expressed in the Declaration of Independence, the U.S. Constitution, the Bill of Rights and the Illinois State Constitution, including: inalienable rights, popular sovereignty, rule of law, due process, separation of powers and checks and balances.

14.11.01 Identify the significance of key Supreme Court decisions and how varying interpretations of the Constitution have defined, limited or expanded individual rights, as well as addressed the Constitutional principles of separation of powers and checks and balances, including: Marbury v. Madison, Dartmouth College v. Woodward, McCulloch v. Maryland, Brown v. Board of Education of Topeka, Baker v. Carr, and United States v. Nixon.

14.5.02 Understand the fundamental principles of American constitutional democracy, including how the government derives its power from the people and the primacy of individual liberty.

14.8.02 Identify the similarities (written document, rule of law, consent of the governed, three separate branches of government) and differences (scope of jurisdiction, limits on government powers, use of the military) between the U.S. and Illinois Constitutions.

14.11.02 Distinguish between enumerated and implied powers in the U.S. and Illinois Constitutions.

14.5.03 Understand why the Bill of Rights was added to the Constitution.

14.8.03 Compare the powers granted to the federal legislative, executive and judicial branches of government to the powers reserved to the states.

14.11.03 Understand the tensions within the U.S. constitutional democracy (e.g., majority role/individual rights; state/national authority; civil disobedience/rule of law; freedom of press/right to a fair trial; religion/government). Analyze the rights contained in the Bill of Rights and explain the process through which amendments are added to the Constitution.




14.8.04 Identify how the Constitution is designed to secure individual liberty by both empowering and limiting central government.

14.11.04 Understand the principles of religious liberty described in the Establishment and Free Exercise clauses of the First Amendment.




14.8.05 Identify unique features of the U.S. Constitution, including the Presidency and an independent judiciary.




Social Science – Goal 14

Grade 5

Grade 8

Grade 11

U.S. GOVERNMENT (STANDARD A)

3%

4%

2%







14.11.05 Identify the “continuity and change” of the U.S. Constitution over time, and why one depends upon the other.







14.11.06 Analyze the development of federal civil rights and voting rights, in terms of: key court cases and ballot initiatives: Dred Scott v. Sanford, Plessy v. Ferguson, Brown v. Board of Education, Regents of California v. Bakke, Zelman v. Ohio; key leaders: A. Philip Randolph, Martin Luther King, Malcolm X, Thurgood Marshall; Constitutional Amendments: 19th and 24th; 1965 Voting Rights Act and Fair Housing Act of 1968.







14.11.07 Understand the growth of the United States government since the New Deal and explain how it has affected the political process over time.

Social Science – Goal 14

Grade 5

Grade 8

Grade 11

POLITICAL SYSTEMS (STANDARD B)

4%

3%

3%

14.5.04 Identify the three branches of government as outlined in the Constitution and identify their functions and relationships.

14.8.06 Identify the advantages and disadvantages of the system of shared powers that the federal government has with the states, as well as the basis on which the writers of the Constitution established such a system.

14.11.08 Compare the American form of government to other forms of government, including: monarchy, oligarchy, theocracy, autocracy, totalitarianism of the Right and Left (e.g., Fascism, Nazism, Stalinism, and Maoism).

14.5.05 Identify the role and responsibilities of local, state and federal branches of government, including: protection of individual rights, national, regional and local interests, immigration, and provision of services (e.g., law enforcement and public education).

14.8.07 Describe the unique responsibilities of elected and appointed officials in local, county and state government, including: mayor, city council, judges, governor, lieutenant governor, secretary of state, comptroller, treasurer, and state representatives.

14.11.09 Compare the responsibilities of elected and appointed local, county and state officials to those elected and appointed to the federal branches, including: U.S. Senators, Members of Congress, U.S. President and Vice-President, and Chief Justice of the Supreme Court.

14.5.06 Identify the structure of one’s city or town government.

14.8.08 Describe how a bill becomes a law in both the Illinois and U.S. legislatures.

14.11.10 Analyze the role of appointed federal cabinet officials and the role of the federal government as it has evolved over time in U.S. History.







14.11.11 Understand major developments in the evolution of western political systems, including: Greek democracy, the Roman Republic, feudalism, monarchies, and the Magna Carta.
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