Ia 2 –Fighting Fate in



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Week 4

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Reading Phase:

Reading Phase:

Seminar Prep:

Seminar/Fishbowl Seminar

Fishbowl Seminar/ Flex Day


Suggested aim:

Literal: SWBAT summarize book 12 lines 1-149


Analysis: SWBAT recognize a pattern of foreshadowing and discuss its relationship to plot and suspense.
Suggested text:

Book XII Lines 1-149



Suggested exit ticket:

What is the purpose of Circe’s advice in Book XII? Why has Homer chosen to include it? What effect does it have on the reader?


Suggested agenda:

-Do now: Entrance Procedure

-Framing: Literary devices: Foreshadowing. Teacher reviews definition and asks students to be on the lookout for this device. As they’re reading, find it, and think about the purpose.

-class will be a combination of CTG reading and independent reading and conferring

-Teacher stops to model tracking theme, ask CfUs and relevant TDQs.

-Students write response to TDQ at the end.


Suggested homework:

Scholars will not complete the assigned reading chunk in class and this must either be assigned as homework or take an extra day to finish the reading.





Suggested aim:

Literal: SWBAT summarize book 12 lines 149-end


Analysis: SWBAT connect the obstacles Odysseus faces to
Suggested text:

XII Lines 149-end


Suggested exit ticket:
What stands in the way of Odysseus’ goal? Name at least two obstacles and provide textual evidence to support. Why can’t Odysseus overcome these obstacles? Connect these obstacles to relevant literary elements and themes.
Suggested agenda:

-Do now: Entrance Procedure

-class will be a combination of CTG reading and independent reading and conferring

-Teacher stops to model tracking theme, ask CfUs and relevant TDQs.

-Students write response to TDQ at the end.
Suggested homework:

Scholars will not complete the assigned reading chunk in class and this must either be assigned as homework or take an extra day to finish the reading.





Suggested aim:

SWBAT identify conflicts that block Odysseus’ success.


SWBAT connect these conflicts to the theme of fate and freewill in paragraphs.
Suggested text:

Books 10-12


Suggested exit ticket:

Students provide a paragraph rationale that explains how the theme presents itself in the passage, citing specific literary elements and devices.


Suggested agenda:

-Do Now/entrance procedure

-Framing: Teacher takes time to remind students of the work that they did last week with theme and close reading.
Teacher will pre-select between 4-6 passages for students to review. Some of these passages may have been highlighted in analysis work last week or in the initial week’s close reading, but teacher should account for some variety.

Students will then take time (15 min) to identify passages in teacher assigned thematic groups (fate or freewill). Then students will do the initial annotations silently before reading in groups to answer the following questions:




  1. What’s the first thing you notice about this passage? What’s the second thing? Are they related?

  2. What conflicts are present in this passage?

  3. How does Homer present these conflicts?

  4. How does the passage make us think about certain characters?

  5. What literary devices are used in this passage (imagery, metaphor, simile, allusion, alliteration)?

  6. What effect do these devices have on the text? (Why are they used?)

  7. How do these techniques relate to the theme of fate or freewill?

-After answering these questions in groups, students will individually write literary analysis paragraphs that connect the form of the passage to the themes present.
Suggested homework:

Teacher could assign further passage identification for homework.




Suggested aim:

SWBAT articulate claims about fate, freewill and Odysseus’ relationship to gods and goddesses in the novel.


SWBAT take thorough and accurate notes to guide individual understanding and analysis.

Suggested text:

Books 10-12


Suggested exit ticket:

Seminar reflection


Suggested agenda:

-Do now/entrance procedure


-Framing seminar/fishbowl

-seminar
Possible Seminar Questions:

Throughout the epic, Odysseus has come into conflict with Zeus, Poseidon, his men, and himself. In chapter 12, examine the obstacles to Odysseus’ journey home that Homer presents. How many of these problems are caused by Odysseus? How many are caused by a force outside of his control? Is man the master of his fate? How do the conflicts Odysseus faces internally and externally shed light on this question? Besides conflict, be sure to highlight other elements of author’s craft that lead to your conclusions: elements such as characterization and symbolism, as well as devices such as imagery, and figurative language
-Seminar reflection
Suggested homework: n/a




Suggested aim:

SWBAT articulate claims about fate, freewill and Odysseus’ relationship to gods and goddesses in the novel.


SWBAT take thorough and accurate notes to guide individual understanding and analysis.
Suggested text:

Books 10-12


Suggested exit ticket:

Seminar reflection


Suggested agenda:

Day built in for two day seminar. Same agenda as Thursday.


Suggested homework:

Re-reading, re-writing, reviewing


Author’s notes:
2 day seminar built in to allow students more time to discuss and reflect.
To set up, split class in two and set up room with an inner and outer circle. Day 1, 1st half sit inside and engage in discussion. 2nd half sits outside and takes notes. Day, groups switch—who was outside is now inside.
Rationale: Pushes students to engage in more heavy lifting.
Concerns about outer circle can be mitigated by collecting notes or assigning students a peer to track and assess during the seminar.

Week 5

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T

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Th

F

Reading Phase:

Reading Phase:

Analysis:

Assessment/Flex Day

Reading Phase


Suggested aim:

Literal: SWBAT summarize lines 1-213 of The Odyssey.


Analysis: SWBAT apply the hero’s quest to Odysseus.
Suggested text:

Book 21, Lines 1-213


Suggested exit ticket:

Describe Odysseus’ homecoming from one of three perspectives: Penelope, Telemachus or Odysseus. How does your chosen character feel about the test that is about to happen? Why? How do you know? Cite evidence to support.


Suggested agenda:

- Do now: Entrance Procedure


-Hype this and the upcoming chapter—this is the climax!
-Framing should be around the hero’s journey—you may want to present the visual map of the hero’s quest to your students so that they can identify where Odysseus is within his journey now.

-class will be a combination of CTG reading and independent reading and conferring


-Teacher stops to model tracking theme, ask CfUs and relevant TDQs.
-Students write response to exit ticket at the end.
Suggested homework:

Scholars will not complete the assigned reading chunk in class and this must either be assigned as homework or take an extra day to finish the reading.


Author’s notes:

Exit activity is a form of what’s commonly called RAFT (Role, Audience, Format,Topic) writing. It’s a creative activity that requires students to use textual inferences to take on the voice of a character.


If teacher prefers, use a more traditional TDQ in its place as an exit ticket.


Suggested aim:

Literal: SWBAT summarize lines 213-end of Book 21


Analysis: SWBAT apply the hero’s quest to Odysseus.
Suggested text:

Book 21, Lines 213-end


Suggested exit ticket:

At the end of book 21, Odysseus says to Telemachus, “My son, your guest sitting here in your house has not disgraced you.” Describe the father/son relationship between Odysseus and Telemachus and how this hero’s journey has impacted it. How could Odysseus have disgraced Telemachus? What happens instead? Why is this significant?


Suggested agenda:

Do now: Entrance Procedure


-Hype this and the upcoming chapter—this is the climax!
-Framing should be around the hero’s journey—you may want to present the visual map of the hero’s quest to your students so that they can identify where Odysseus is within his journey now.

-class will be a combination of CTG reading and independent reading and conferring


-Teacher stops to model tracking theme, ask CfUs and relevant TDQs.
-Students write response to exit ticket at the end.
Suggested homework:

Scholars will not complete the assigned reading chunk in class and this must either be assigned as homework or take an extra day to finish the reading.




Suggested aim:

Skill: SWBAT identify the plot structure in The Odyssey.


Skill: SWBAT connect this plot structure to the theme of homecoming.
Suggested text:

Book 21
Suggested exit ticket:

What themes seem most important at the climax of the book: fate and freewill, heroism, or homecoming? Explain your rationale.
Suggested agenda:

-Do Now/Entrance Procedure

-Framing/INM: Plot structure introduction or review.
Questions to pose:

-Does The Odyssey have a traditional plot structure?


Modeling/Think-a-loud: Teacher models finding the plot structure for Book 9. Asks, why is this book set up this way? What are the benefits of this traditional plot structure? What themes does this bring forth?
GP: Students in pairs identify the plot structure of Book X. Ask the same questions: why is this book set up this way? What are the benefits of this traditional plot structure? What themes does this bring forth?
IP: Students identify individually or in pairs the plot structure of The Odyssey thus far. What themes seem most important right now: fate and freewill, heroism, or homecoming? Explain your rationale.
Suggested homework:

Teacher’s discretion





Suggested aim:

SWBAT show mastery of comprehension and analysis of The Odyssey on a comprehension quiz.



Author’s notes:

Purpose of the quiz:

To Assess:

-Students’ comprehension skills

-Students’ analysis skills
The most high impact quizzes might be giving students a section of text and then asking them to annotate and interact with it in paragraph form.
This day can also be used as a flex day for reading.



Suggested aim:

Literal: SWBAT summarize lines 1-161 of Book 22


Analysis: Given lines 1-161 of Book 22, SWBAT determine author’s tone and purpose for slaughtering the suitors mercilessly.
Suggested text:

lines 1-161 of Book 22


Suggested exit ticket:

We’re in the middle of major slaughter! Does Homer approve or disapprove of Odysseus’ actions? Are his actions justified? Provide evidence in the text to prove your response.



Suggested agenda:

- Do now: Entrance Procedure


-Hype this and the upcoming chapter—this is the climax!
-Framing should be around identifying author’s purpose and tone. Guide students to pay close attention to the language Homer uses to describe the slaughter and Odysseus’ and Telemachus’ actions. It’s gory stuff. Why are we reveling in violent imagery? What does Homer want his audience to feel?

-class will be a combination of CTG reading and independent reading and conferring


-Teacher stops to model tracking theme, ask CfUs and relevant TDQs.
-Students write response to exit ticket at the end.

Suggested homework:

Scholars will not complete the assigned reading chunk in class and this must either be assigned as homework or take an extra day to finish the reading.



Week 6

M

T

W

Th

F

Reading Phase

Reading Phase

Seminar Prep:

Fishbowl/Seminar:

Fishbowl Seminar/

Flex Day


Suggested aim:

Literal: SWBAT summarize lines 162-end of Book 22.


Analysis: Given lines 162-end of Book 22, SWBAT evaluate the heroism of Telemachus and Odysseus.
Suggested text:

lines 162-end of Book 22.



Suggested exit ticket:

Odysseus and Telemachus kill all the suitors in this chapter. Evaluate their actions. Are they heroic? Does this episode fit in with the visions of heroism we reviewed at the beginning of the unit? Provide evidence in the text to prove your response.


Suggested agenda:

Do now: Entrance Procedure


-Hype this and the upcoming chapter—this is the climax!
-Framing should be around identifying author’s purpose and tone and matching this episode with other visions of heroism we’ve looked at in other texts. Guide students to pay close attention to the language Homer uses to describe the slaughter and Odysseus’ and Telemachus’ actions. It’s gory stuff. Why are we reveling in violent imagery? What does Homer want his audience to feel?

-class will be a combination of CTG reading and independent reading and conferring


-Teacher stops to model tracking theme, ask CfUs and relevant TDQs.
-Students write response to exit ticket at the end.
Suggested homework:

Scholars will not complete the assigned reading chunk in class and this must either be assigned as homework or take an extra day to finish the reading.




Suggested aim:

Literal: SWBAT summarize lines 170-422 of Book 23.


Analysis: Given lines 170-422 of Book 23, SWBAT describe how the major themes of fate and freewill, family and homecoming, and honor and heroism develop in bigger ideas by the end of the novel.
Suggested text:

lines 170-422 of Book 23.


Suggested exit ticket:

Choose one of our major themes:



  • Fate and freewill

  • Heroism and honor

  • Homecoming and family

Write a well-developed paragraph about this theme and its significance to The Odyssey. How does this theme develop over the course of the novel? What literary elements help create this theme? What general truth about this overarching theme does Homer suggest through his work?
Suggested agenda:

Do now: Entrance Procedure


-Framing: This is a really beautiful chapter—O and P finally get to be together—after all that violence we finally get to see love. It’s also the “end” of the novel. It’s a good time to review and to look backwards at the themes we’ve seen.

-class will be a combination of CTG reading and independent reading and conferring


-Teacher stops to model tracking theme, ask CfUs and relevant TDQs.
-Students write response to exit ticket at the end.
Suggested homework:

Scholars will not complete the assigned reading chunk in class and this must either be assigned as homework or take an extra day to finish the reading.




Suggested aim:

SWBAT connect passages to particular themes within the text by examining literary elements and authorial techniques.


SWBAT justify their selections with annotations and paragraph responses.

Suggested text:

Whole book, with focus on chapters 21-23


Suggested exit ticket:

Students provide a paragraph rationale that explains how the theme presents itself in the passage, citing specific literary elements and devices.


Suggested agenda:

Do Now/entrance procedure


-Framing: Teacher takes time to remind students of the work that they have done previously with theme and close reading.
Teacher will pre-select between 8-10 passages for students to review.
Students will then take time (15 min) to identify passages in teacher assigned thematic groups (fate and freewill, homecoming and family, heroism and honor, etc). Students must select a passage that relates to their given theme.
Then students will do the initial annotations silently before reading in groups to answer the following questions:


  1. What’s the first thing you notice about this passage? What’s the second thing? Are they related?

  2. What conflicts are present in this passage?

  3. How does Homer present these conflicts?

  4. How does the passage make us think about certain characters?

  5. What literary devices are used in this passage (imagery, metaphor, simile, allusion, alliteration)?

  6. What effect do these devices have on the text? (Why are they used?)

  7. How do these techniques relate to your chosen theme?

-After answering these questions in groups, students will individually write literary analysis paragraphs that connect the form of the passage to the themes present.
Suggested homework:

Teacher could assign further passage identification for homework.



Author’s notes:



Suggested aim:

SWBAT articulate claims about the most significant themes in the novel: fate and freewill, homecoming and family, honor and heroism


SWBAT take thorough and accurate notes to guide individual understanding and analysis.
Suggested text:

Whole book, with focus on chapters 21-23


Suggested exit ticket:

Seminar Reflection


Suggested agenda:

Do now/entrance procedure


-Framing seminar/fishbowl
-seminar
Possible Seminar Question:
Theme-Off:

  1. Over the course of the novel, we’ve been tracking theme and analyzing how elements of author’s craft have helped develop specific themes. Which theme is most significant to the novel as a whole? Which themes are most relevant to our modern lives?

  2. Your PBA prompt, as you know is touches on the themes of fate and freewill. Are these the most significant themes in the novel? How have these ideas developed over the course of the novel? How are they relevant to our modern lives?



Suggested homework:




Suggested aim:

SWBAT articulate claims about the most significant themes in the novel: fate and freewill, homecoming and family, honor and heroism


SWBAT take thorough and accurate notes to guide individual understanding and analysis.
Suggested text:

Whole book, with focus on chapters 21-23


Suggested exit ticket:

Seminar Reflection


Suggested agenda:

Day built in for two day seminar. Same agenda as Thursday.


Suggested homework:

Re-reading, re-writing, reviewing


Author’s notes:
2 day seminar built in to allow students more time to discuss and reflect.
To set up, split class in two and set up room with an inner and outer circle. Day 1, 1st half sit inside and engage in discussion. 2nd half sits outside and takes notes. Day, groups switch—who was outside is now inside.
Rationale: Pushes students to engage in more heavy lifting.


Week 7

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F

Reading to Learn

Reading to Learn

Analysis

Analysis

Assessment day/Flex Day


Suggested aim:

Literal: SWBAT summarize important arguments in “Homer’s Polytheism”


Synthesis: Given “Homer’s Polytheism,” SWBAT explain the relationship between the modern idea of luck and the ancient idea of gods.
Suggested text:

“Homer’s Polytheism”


Suggested exit ticket:

TDQ:


At the bottom of page 61, it states: “Excellence in the Greek sense involves neither the Christian notion of humility nor the Roman ideal of stoic adherence to duty. Instead, excellence in the Homeric world depends crucially on one’s sense of gratitude and wonder.” What do the authors mean by this? How is the Ancient Greek attitude towards life different from our modern attitude towards life? What can we learn from this?
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