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Aim Sequence

Week 1

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Reading to Learn

Reading to Learn


Reading to Learn

Close Reading Analysis

Close Reading Analysis


Suggested aim:

Given the excerpt “The Trojan War,” SWBAT analyze the cultural values of Ancient Greece.


Suggested text:

Edith Hamilton’s “The Trojan War”


Suggested exit ticket:

-After reading the account of The Trojan War, determine at least three ideals the Greeks valued. Why were they valued? Cite at least three passages from the text to support your response.


Suggested agenda:

-Do now: complete unit anticipation guide or complete a KWL chart about Greek and Roman Mythology

-Text hype: The Odyssey! Love! Loyalty! Violence!-- it’s a Telenovela. Get the kids pumped!

-Framing: Quote from Edith Hamilton’s introduction:


“Greek and Roman mythology is quite generally supposed to show us the way the human race thought and felt untold ages ago. Through it, according to this view, we can retrace the path from civilized man who lives so far from nature, to man who lived in close companionship with nature…”
This is the frame through which mythology will be read—it’s a way for us to learn what mattered to people in ancient times.’
-Class reading: “The Trojan War” through the lens of what did Greeks value; teacher stops to ask relevant TDQs; Students annotate for values. Possible annotations or patterns to suggest: H for Honor; T for Tradition; L for Loyalty; F for Family

-Guided Practice: students continue reading and identifying values of ancient Greeks through annotations.

-Doc cam review of randomly selected students
-Discussion: What values are students noticing? Why? What is their reasoning?
-Independent Practice: Paragraph response to Exit Ticket
Suggested Homework:
Assign other myths or nonfiction reading on Ancient Greece as homework



Suggested aim:

After reading an excerpt from the introduction to The Odyssey by Bernard Knox and reviewing a graphic illustrating the hero’s journey, SWBAT describe the concept of oral tradition, the hero’s journey, and at least three different theories about who Homer was.


Suggested text:

An introduction to The Odyssey by Bernard Knox



(in appendix)
Suggested exit ticket/quiz:

  1. Describe the hero cycle.

  2. Describe oral tradition

  3. List at least three different theories of who Homer was. Cite passages of the introduction to support. Why do you think so many different theories about Homer exist?

  4. How will this information inform our reading of The Odyssey?


Suggested agenda:

-Do Now: Short definition of oral tradition or question to access student prior knowledge about story telling.


-Frame for reading:

Define cultural context.


The cultural context an author writes in will have an impact on his work.
Today is all about defining Homer’s cultural context:

  • Who was he?

  • What are the theories behind who he was?

  • What kind of world did he live in?

  • What are the implications of this for the text we are about to read?

-Class reading: “Introduction” through the lens of “Who was Homer?”; teacher stops to ask CfUs and relevant TDQs


-Guided Practice: students continue reading and monitoring for theories about who Homer was and the history of the text

-Doc cam review of randomly selected students


-Discussion: Why does it matter if Homer existed or not?
-Review of the Hero’s quest
-Independent Practice: Response to Exit Ticket
Suggested Homework:
Assign other myths or nonfiction reading on Ancient Greece as homework



Suggested aim:

Given a brainstorm of heroic traits, a list of ancient Greek ideals and an excerpt from an interview w Joseph Campbell, SWBAT apply two definitions of heroism to a passage of The Trojan War.



Suggested text:

  • Ancient Greek Ideals handout

  • Interview w Joseph Campbell

  • Short excerpt from Edith Hamilton’s Hercules.


Suggested exit ticket:

TDQ:


(1)Based on Greek Ideals and Joseph’s Campbell’s interview, what is a hero? 
(2) Read the excerpt from Edith Hamilton’s “Hercules”.  In what ways does Hercules exemplify the definition of a hero derived from Greek Ideals and Joseph Campell’s interview? In what ways does he differ 
Suggested agenda:

Do Now: Begin this activity with a brainstorm that is generated by students. Ask them how heroes of today might be dependent on what we value today.


Group or Independent reading: After debriefing as a class, hand out “Ancient Greek Ideals” to students and have them read and discuss:

  1. How is this similar or different to what we value?

  2. Based on these ideals (and what you know about Ancient Greece, what would an ancient hero look like?

Hand out or view Joseph Campbell’s interview with Bill Moyers.

  1. Is there any truth in what Campbell says about modern values: “[We have] no notion of having to give ourselves in order to achieve something.” Why do you think he says this?

Independent Practice: Have students synthesize the ideals from ancient Greece, Campbell’s interview, and the short passage from Hercules to answer the day’s TDQ.
Suggested Homework:

Students read Edith Hamilton’s account of the “House of Atreus.”


Author’s note:
Other myths or a passage from The Odyssey may be used in place of Hercules.


Suggested aim:

Literal: SWBAT summarize the first 52 lines of The Odyssey.

Analysis: Given the first 52 lines of The Odyssey, SWBAT explain and analyze the overarching conflict of man vs gods.
Suggested text:

Beginning of Book I: Lines 1-52


Suggested exit ticket:

TDQ:


1. Zeus says: “Ah, how shameless—the way the mortals blame the gods. From us alone, they say, come all their miseries.” What does Zeus mean by this? Why do men blame the gods for “all their miseries”? What does this line suggest about the relationship between men and gods?
2. How does Homer craft this conflict at the beginning of the novel?
Suggested agenda:

1st read: literal understanding and CfUs. Teacher will need to break down sentences and discuss student self-monitoring for meaning.


2nd read: analysis of conflict—Men vs Gods; teacher should ask relevant TDQs connected to the meaning of the conflict.
3rd read: analysis of author’s craft—How does Homer craft the beginning of his epic? How does he present this conflict? Why does he present it this way?



Suggested aim:

Literal: SWBAT summarize lines 52-102 of Book I


Analysis: SWBAT analyze how Homer has crafted the beginning of his epic.
Suggested text:

Book I: Lines 53-102


Suggested exit ticket:

TDQ: Why does Homer begin his tale “in media res”? How does this chapter frame the epic?


Suggested agenda:

1st read: Literal comprehension and CfUs.


2nd read: analysis of Athena’s argument: How does she convince Zeus to let Odysseus come home?
3rd read: analysis of craft: Why does Homer begin this way? How does this frame Odysseus’ journey for the reader?
Sugested homework:

Chapter 15





Week 2

M

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F

Reading Phase

Reading phase

Reading phase

Quiz/Seminar Prep

Seminar

Suggested aim:

Literal: SWBAT summarize lines 1-259 of Book 9


Analysis: Given lines 1-259 of Book 9, SWBAT characterize Odysseus.
Suggested text:

Book 9 Lines 1-259


Suggested exit ticket:

TDQ:

At the end of this section, Odysseus’ men beg to “make away with the cheeses, then come back—hurry drive the lambs and kids from the pens to our swift ship, put out to sea at once!’” What do the men want? Why might Odysseus want something different? How does this relate to Odysseus’ character?


Suggested agenda:

-Do Now and Entry Procedure

-Combination of CTG and independent reading during reading phase lesson to get through the chunk of text.
Possible Leading TDQs to help students reach the culminating exit slip:


  1. Right now, Odysseus is beginning his story to his hosts, the Phaecians. He has been their guest for quite some time (3 books previous!) How does Odysseus introduce himself? What do you think that means about how he views himself?

  2. Do the gods interfere w Odysseus’ travels and adventures? Which gods? When? Why?

  3. How does Odysseus react to setbacks? Cite at least one passage that shows Odysseus reacting to set back. What does this reaction reveal about Odysseus’ character?

-Independent writing: students answer culminating TDQ as an exit slip.

Suggested homework:

Re-read today’s chunk for better understanding and improved annotations. There will be a quiz on this weeks’ readings on Thursday.





Suggested aim:

Literal: SWBAT summarize lines 260-486 of Book 9


Analysis: Given lines 260-486 of Book 9, SWBAT characterize Odysseus
Suggested text:

Book 9 lines 260-486


Suggested exit ticket:

TDQ:


How does Odysseus trick the Cyclops? What does this trick reveal about Odysseus’ character?
Suggested agenda:

-Do Now and Entry Procedure

-Combination of CTG and independent reading during reading phase lesson to get through the chunk of text.
-Independent writing: students answer culminating TDQ as an exit slip.
Suggested homework:
Re-read today’s chunk for better understanding and improved annotations. There will be a quiz on this weeks’ readings on Thursday.


Suggested aim:

Literal: SWBAT summarize lines 486-630 of Book 9


Analysis: Given lines 486-630 of Book 9, SWBAT characterize Odysseus
Suggested text:

Book 9 lines 486-630


Suggested exit ticket:

Quiz Preparation:

Identify 3 key passages that reveal something about Odysseus’ character. Explain what they reveal and justify your selection: why are these passages more significant than others you could have chosen?
Suggested agenda:

-Do Now and Entry Procedure

-Combination of CTG and independent reading during reading phase lesson to get through the chunk of text.
-Independent passage selection:

Students can do this individually, in pairs or in groups, depending on teacher’s preference.


-Share-out—students should share significant passages so that they can review for tomorrow’s comprehension quiz.

Suggested homework:

Re-read today’s chunk for better understanding and improved annotations. There will be a quiz on this weeks’ readings on Thursday.


Author’s notes:


Suggested aim:

Inferential:

Given Odysseus’ characterization, SWBAT describe his conflicts and relationships with the gods.
Suggested text:

Book 9
Suggested Comprehension Quiz:

Students write a well-developed paragraph on the following question:
What does Odysseus reveal to the Cyclops at the end of the book? Why does he do this? What does it reveal about his character?
Suggested agenda:

--Comp Quiz (20 min)

--Quiz Review and Seminar preparation: After teacher collects quizzes, teacher and students review exemplary responses, which should hit the following key points:


  • O reveals his real name

  • He reveals it because he believes he’s gotten away

  • This reveals pride or hubris

After reviewing this, teacher should preview tomorrow’s seminar questions:




  • Heroism: Is O a hero?

  • Fate and freewill: Do the gods prevent O from getting home?

  • The connection between these two:

Does O escape Polyphemus on his own or with the help of the gods?
-Students begin by listing questions they have about book 9. Begin with level 1 or comprehension questions, but then move on to analysis questions on the above themes. Students may draft these questions individually or in groups, but teacher should make sure there is a way to collect these questions for the class.
-Students then begin looking for answers to their questions and the previewed seminar questions in the book.
Suggested homework:

Graphic organizer or post it notes that track evidence for the upcoming seminar.




Suggested aim:

Seminar:


SWBAT articulate claims about heroism, fate, and Odysseus’ relationship to gods and goddesses in the novel.
Suggested text:

Book 9
Suggested exit ticket:

Seminar reflection and seminar notes


Suggested agenda:

-Do Now and entrance procedure

-Socratic seminar:

Possible questions:




  1. During Book 9, Odysseus makes some choices, like telling Polyphemus his name, that make Poseidon and other gods angry. First, name some of these choices that go against the gods’ wishes in Chapter 9. Why does Odysseus make these choices? What do these choices reveal about Odysseus’ character? Does his disobedience make him heroic or too stubborn for his own good? Explain.

  2. Odysseus manages to escape against Poseidon’s wishes. How does he escape? Does he have any help from the gods, or does he do it on his own? First, find evidence that the gods did or did not interfere with his escape from Polyphemus. Then determine if Odysseus is the master of his own fate or if his journey lies in the hands of the gods.

-Seminar reflection

Author’s notes:

If wanted—a two day seminar could be beneficial to promote more student discussion. To set this up, teacher would split class in two and create an inner and outer circle seating arrangement. Group 1 would answer the seminar questions on the first day while Group 2 would take notes. On the second day, the two groups would switch. I’ve found that two day seminars aid student comprehension and it allows some of the quieter students a chance to speak. If this is wanted, teachers will need to budget in time for this. In later seminars, I will budget in this time.





Week 3

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Analysis Practice/

Reading Phase 2

Reading Phase 2:

Assessment/Flex Day

Analysis Practice

Analysis Practice


Suggested aim:

Literal: SWBAT summarize lines 1-251 of Book 10.


Analysis: Given lines 1-251 of Book 10, SWBAT connect Odysseus’ internal conflict to a theme.

Suggested text:

Book 10, lines 1-251


Suggested exit ticket:

TDQ:

Why does Odysseus say “should I leap over the side and drown at once or grit my teeth and bear it, stay among the living?” on lines 55-57? Describe his internal conflict. Why is this internal conflict significant to the rest of the passage? How does it relate to a larger idea or theme?


Suggested agenda:

-Do now/entrance procedure


After entrance procedure and Do Now, teacher presents an overall definition of theme:

THEME: A message or idea about life that recurs throughout the novel. It is not necessarily a moral or lesson, but something the author believes to be TRUE about the human experience.

-Teacher then presents the following question to small groups to answer:


  • What ideas or messages about life have recurred in The Odyssey thus far? Create a list of as many as you can in two minutes.

  • Teacher will present these guidelines to help students generate themes:

    • Is it repeated throughout the text?

    • Does it motivate the characters?

    • Is it an idea found in other texts?

    • Can it be generalized to have meaning in our lives?

-Students will generate their list and present to the class through a whip around.

-Teacher will emphasize or add to the list the following ideas:



  • The significance of homecoming/ importance of family

  • Perseverance in times of struggle

  • Glory and heroism

  • Fate/Freewill—does man control the course of his life or is it up to some greater being/greater force?

-The rest of the class will be a combination of CTG reading and independent reading and conferring

-Teacher stops to model tracking theme, ask CfUs and relevant TDQs.

-Students write response to TDQ at the end.


Suggested homework:

Scholars will not complete the assigned reading chunk in class and this must either be assigned as homework or take an extra day to finish the reading.


Author’s note:

Teacher may decide to give significant themes for tracking immediately after the group brainstorm, or wait until later in the week to reveal.





Suggested aim:

Literal: SWBAT summarize lines 252- end of Book 10.


Analysis: Given lines 252-end of book 10, SWBAT describe Odysseus’ heroism towards his crew and connect it to a theme.
Suggested text:

lines 252- end of Book 10.


Suggested exit ticket:

TDQ: At the beginning of this section, Eurylochus says, ”Don’t force me back there, captain king—leave me here on the spot,. You will never return yourself, I swear, you’ll never bring back a single man alive. Quick, cut and run with the rest of us here—we can still escape the fatal day!” What is Odysseus’ response? Connect his response to a larger theme that is present within The Odyssey and explain your rationale.


Suggested agenda:

-Do now: Entrance Procedure

class will be a combination of CTG reading and independent reading and conferring

-Teacher stops to model tracking theme, ask CfUs and relevant TDQs.

-Students write response to TDQ at the end.
Suggested homework:

Scholars will not complete the assigned reading chunk in class and this must either be assigned as homework or take an extra day to finish the reading.




Suggested aim:

SWBAT show mastery of comprehension and analysis of The Odyssey on a comprehension quiz.



Author’s notes:

Purpose of the quiz:

To Assess:

-Students’ comprehension skills

-Students’ analysis skills
Author’s Note:

The most high impact quizzes might be giving students a section of text and then asking them to annotate and interact with it in paragraph form.


This day can also be used as a flex day for reading.


Suggested aim:

SWBAT identify passages that exemplify a theme.


SWBAT justify their choice of passage through close reading.
Suggested text:

Books 9-10



Suggested exit ticket:

Students provide a paragraph rationale that explains how the theme presents itself in the passage.


Suggested agenda:

-Do now/entrance procedure

-Framing: Teacher returns back to the class list of themes from Monday. Asks students to brainstorm any other themes they’d like to add. Asks students to determine or vote for which themes they think are the most significant and why, prompting students to cite textual evidence in the book.

-Teacher explains that one of the reasons The Odyssey has endured over time has been because of its ability to speak to and about many facets of human life. One of the biggest facets it speaks to is human purpose and the idea of fate or freewill: Does man decide his life’s outcomes or does some external factor outside of his control decide it for him?

**Introduce PBA Prompt—could be a good place

-Teacher defines terms if necessary.

-Teacher splits class into pre-assigned groups and will assign one of the themes, fate or freewill, to each group.

-Teacher directs students to pre-selected passages. Here are possible selections:



  • Beginning of Book IX, lines 45-84

  • End of Book IX, lines 580-620

  • Beginning of Book X, lines 49-89

  • Middle of Book X, lines 366-445 (longer than others and could be cut)

Each passage exemplifies an idea about the theme of fate or freewill

  • Students must identify what theme is presented in their given passage

  • Students provide a paragraph rationale that explains how the theme presents itself in the passage.

  • Student identifies other literary elements (conflict, O’s characterization) and explains how these contribute to the overall theme


Author’s notes:

Be sure to think through group work procedures and pairings as well as any significant roles or protocols you’d like to put in place to make sure group work runs smoothly.




Suggested aim:

SWBAT present an oral justification of their chosen theme and passage.


SWBAT respond to the question: What is the role of the gods and the goddesses in The Odyssey?
Suggested text:

Books 9-10


Suggested exit ticket:

What is the role of the gods and the goddesses in The Odyssey? How do they connect to the themes of fate and freewill?


Suggested agenda:

-Do Now/entrance procedure


-Framing: teacher asks students to get back in yesterday’s groups. Together, they will review the passage and response they created yesterday and edit it with teacher’s comments. Then, they will prepare to present their passage and justification to another group in a jigsaw, so that they can learn from each other’s responses and answer an ultimate question at the end.
**Note to teacher: Reviewing the previous days’ responses for accuracy and depth is a must. Be sure to give students enough feedback so they can revise their responses.
-Jigsaw procedure:

***Teacher’s note:

Keep groups to 4 max—2 with the theme of freewill, 2 with the theme of fate.
Each student has three minutes to:


  1. Summarize the passage and direct peers to specific pages and line numbers

  2. Justify how it connects to the theme of fate or freewill, providing at least 3 smaller quotes within the passage to support.

  3. Identify any literary devices within the passage that support the given theme.

  4. Peers ask questions or provide feedback.

  5. Student presenters switch.

-Reserve time at the end of the jigsaw to engage in the exit slip questions or in a peer assessment.


-Exit slip question can also be used as homework.
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