I. The Emergence of Feudalism



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Feudalism Book Outline Name_______________________________________________
Honors European
Pages 186 – 190

I. The Emergence of Feudalism

After the decline of Charlemagne’s empire due to invasions, people turned to a new way to protect themselves and their property, called ______________. This was a loosely organized system of rule in which powerful local ______________ divided land holdings among lesser lords. These lesser lords were known as ______________ and pledged their loyalty to the greater lord.



A. Mutual Obligations

The relationship between lords and vassals was established by tradition and by an exchange of pledges known as the ____________________________. ______________were granted to vassals by lords, which could range from ____________________________. This relationship depended on the lord’s ______________ of the vassal, and the vassal’s ______________ to his lord.



II. The World of Nobles

For feudal nobles, warfare was a way of life. Nobles trained from boyhood for an occupation as a mounted warrior, known as a ______________.



A. Achieving Knighthood

Young knights would be sent away at age ______________to learn to ride, fight, and keep his armor and weapons in good condition. For practice, knights would conduct mock battles known as ______________. Early tournaments were as dangerous as battles.



B. Castles

During the Middle Ages powerful lords would fortify their homes to withstand an attack by building a ______________. ______________ were wooden towers ringed by a fence and surrounded by a water filled ditch called a ______________.

As time went on, castles became larger and made of ______________. Wars often focused on seizing castles ________________________________________________________.

C. Noblewomen

Noblewomen played active roles in the warrior society _________________________


____________________________________________________________________________________
. Sometimes she might have to go to war to defend her estate.

A few noblewomen took hand in politics. For example, ______________of ______________inherited lands in southwestern France. Through two marriages, she became, first, queen of ______________ and, later, queen of ______________.

Women’s rights to ______________ were severely restricted under the feudal system. Land usually passed to the eldest son in the family, but women did receive land as a part of her ______________. Daughters of nobles were sent to friends and relatives to train not unlike their brothers. Young women were expected to learn how to ______________and ______________and how to ____________________________. As a ______________, she was expected to bear many ______________ and be dutiful to her husband.

D. Chivalry

______________was a code of conduct adopted by ______________in the late Middle Ages. Chivalry required knights to be __________________________________________. Chivalry had limits however, in that it applied only to knights and not to ______________.

III. Peasants & Manor Life

A. Manor Life

The heart of the medieval economy was the ______________, or lord’s estate. Most manors included one or more villages and surrounding land. ______________who made up the majority of the population in medieval society ______________and ______________on the manor.

Most peasants on the manor were ______________, bound to the land. If a manor was granted to a new lord, the serf went with it.

B. Mutual Obligations

Peasants worked several days per week farming the lord’s lands. They also ______________ ____________________________. Peasants paid the lord a fee when the ______________, inherited their fathers ______________, or when they used a ____________________________. Due to a lack of currency, peasants often paid fees in products such as ______________________________ ____________.

In return, peasants had the right to farm several acres for themselves. They were also entitled to their lord’s protection from ____________________________or ____________________________. Although they could not leave the manor freely, they also could not be forced off it, guaranteeing them ____________________________, and ______________.

C. Peasant Life

Like farmers everywhere, European peasants worked according to the ______________. In spring and autumn, they ______________and ______________. In summer they ______________. In winter ______________was common. ______________took a heavy toll, and few peasants lived beyond age ______________.

Feudalism Book Outline Name_______________________________________________
Honors European
Pages 186 – 190

I. The Emergence of Feudalism

After the decline of Charlemagne’s empire due to invasions, people turned to a new way to protect themselves and their property, called Feudalism. This was a loosely organized system of rule in which powerful local lords divided land holdings among lesser lords. These lesser lords were known as vassals and pledged their loyalty to the greater lord.



A. Mutual Obligations

The relationship between lords and vassals was established by tradition and by an exchange of pledges known as the feudal contract. Fiefs were granted to vassals by lords, which could range from a few acres to a few hundred miles. This relationship depended on the lord’s protection of the vassal, and the vassal’s loyalty to his lord.



II. The World of Nobles

For feudal nobles, warfare was a way of life. Nobles trained from boyhood for an occupation as a mounted warrior, known as a knight.



A. Achieving Knighthood

Young knights would be sent away at age seven to learn to ride, fight, and keep his armor and weapons in good condition. For practice, knights would conduct mock battles known as tournaments. Early tournaments were as dangerous as battles.



B. Castles

During the Middle Ages powerful lords would fortify their homes to withstand an attack by building a keep. Keeps were wooden towers ringed by a fence and surrounded by a water filled ditch called a moat.

As time went on, castles became larger and made of stone. Wars often focused on seizing castles that commanded strategic river crossings, harbors, or mountain passes.

C. Noblewomen

Noblewomen played active roles in the warrior society by supervising vassals, managing the household, and performing necessary agricultural and medical tasks. Sometimes she might have to go to war to defend her estate.

A few noblewomen took hand in politics. For example, Eleanor of Aquitaine inherited lands in southwestern France. Through two marriages, she became, first, queen of France and, later, queen of England.

Women’s rights to inheritance were severely restricted under the feudal system. Land usually passed to the eldest son in the family, but women did receive land as a part of her dowry. Daughters of nobles were sent to friends and relatives to train not unlike their brothers. Young women were expected to learn how to spin and weave and how to supervise servants. As a wife, she was expected to bear many children and be dutiful to her husband.



D. Chivalry

Chivalry was a code of conduct adopted by knights in the late Middle Ages. Chivalry required knights to be brave, loyal, and true to your word. Chivalry had limits however, in that it applied only to knights and not to commoners.

III. Peasants & Manor Life

A. Manor Life

The heart of the medieval economy was the manor, or lord’s estate. Most manors included one or more villages and surrounding land. Peasants who made up the majority of the population in medieval society lived and worked on the manor.

Most peasants on the manor were serfs, bound to the land. If a manor was granted to a new lord, the serf went with it.

B. Mutual Obligations

Peasants worked several days per week farming the lord’s lands. They also repaired his roads, bridges, and fences. Peasants paid the lord a fee when the married, inherited their fathers acres, or when they used a mill to grind grain. Due to a lack of currency, peasants often paid fees in products such as grain, honey, eggs, or chickens.



In return, peasants had the right to farm several acres for themselves. They were also entitled to their lord’s protection from Viking raids or feudal warfare. Although they could not leave the manor freely, they also could not be forced off it, guaranteeing them food, housing, and land.

C. Peasant Life

Like farmers everywhere, European peasants worked according to the season. In spring and autumn, they plowed and harvested. In summer they hayed. In winter hunger was common. Disease took a heavy toll, and few peasants lived beyond age 35.


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