I. Documentation of the Planning Process



Download 230.91 Kb.
Page3/6
Date conversion29.04.2016
Size230.91 Kb.
1   2   3   4   5   6

D. Jurisdictions

The Jurisdictions that participated in the NHMP were:




Hocking County

Village of Laurelville

Village of Murray City

City of Logan

Benton Township

Falls Township (includes Falls Gore Township)

Good Hope Township

Green Township

Laurel Township

Marion Township

Perry Township

Salt Creek Township

Starr Township

Ward Township

Washington Township

Village Mayors agreed to participate in the planning process. A letter was sent out stating the following:


We are in the process of writing a Mitigation Plan for Hocking County. The Hocking County Emergency Management Agency (EMA) has received a grant to write the plan. The Hocking County EMA has contracted with Bob Burris and Audie Wykle of the Hocking County Regional Planning Office to oversee the project and the Hocking Soil and Water Conservation District to do the research and write the plan. We are asking you to become involved and help with this project by sitting on the Core Group. It is important to have a wide variety of participation in the group.
This project is very crucial for the county because after 2005, if we do not have a Mitigation Plan in place, all entities in the county will not be eligible for FEMA funding or any mitigation work. This would also include funding for any disasters (natural or manmade) such as flooding, tornadoes, etc.
We have scheduled the first meeting for the Core Group for Thursday, October 23, 2003, at 3 p.m. in the Emergency Operations Center Conference Room located at 52 East Second Street, Logan. Please plan to attend.
Each township, village or city will need to come up with a project for their jurisdiction, so if funding becomes available, the project is planned and ready to be implemented. (Robert Burris, Hocking County Regional Planner)


Hazard Identification and Risk Assessment

A. Community Profile

Hocking County Ohio, was formed from parts of Athens, Fairfield and Ross Counties by an act of the Ohio Legislature on March 1, 1818. As new counties were formed, the boundaries of Hocking County changed until 1850, when the current boundaries were established.


Hocking County is located in the southeastern part of Ohio. It is bounded on the north by Perry and Fairfield Counties, on the west by Pickaway and Ross Counties, on the south by Vinton County, and on the east and southeast by Athens County. Hocking County has an area of 269,440 acres, or 421 square miles. The population in 2000 was 28,241. The County Seat of Hocking County is Logan.
The primary land use in Hocking County is woodland. Forest land comprises approximately 198,854 acres, or about 74 percent of the total land in the county. Recreation and tourism are also very important land uses in the county. The Hocking Hills had 2,021,126 people visit in 2003 (Logan Daily News 2/27/04). The county has Hocking Hills State Park (which contains many different parks), Hocking Hills State Forest, Tar Hollow State Park, Wayne National Forest, and Clear Creek Metro Park. These parks and forests cover approximately 39,617 acres (ODNR brochures, US Forest Service, and Hocking County Plat Book). U.S. Route 33 and State Routes 56, 78, 93, 180, 216, 278, 312, 327, 328, 374, 595, 664, 668, and 678 along with the Hocking River run through the county. With the scheduled opening of the U.S. Route 33/Lancaster By-Pass, the County has and will continue to see major population growth and development. Residential growth will likely occur along the U.S. Route 33 corridor. Flood Plain regulations will prohibit development in any flood prone areas. Based on census data, the population of Hocking County is growing at less than 1 percent. Probably no more than 1 (20 to 30 lot) subdivision will be approved per year. Subdivisions are regulated by the City and County Planning Commissions. (See Exhibit H for a table of existing land use densities in the identified hazard areas.)
Hocking County has a continental climate characterized by wide annual and daily ranges in temperatures. Winters are cold and snowy. Summers are warm and humid and are occasionally marked by very hot days. Rainfall is well distributed throughout the year. The normal annual precipitation is adequate for all the crops commonly grown in the county. The growing season in the valleys differs slightly from that on the ridgetops. In the winter, the average temperature is 32 degrees F, and the average daily minimum temperature is 21 degrees. The lowest temperature on record, which occurred on January 28, 1963, is -27 degrees. In the Summer the average temperature is 71 degrees, and the average daily maximum temperature is 85 degrees. The highest recorded temperature, which occurred on July 14, 1954, is 104 degrees. The average annual rainfall is about 40 inches. Heavy rains, which occur at any time of the year, and severe thunderstorms in summer cause flash flooding, particularly in narrow valleys. Thunderstorms occur on about 45 days each year. The average seasonal snowfall is about 30 inches. The prevailing wind is from the northwest. Average wind speed is highest, 8 miles per hour, in spring.

(Soil Survey of Hocking County, Ohio, USDA Soil Conservation Service, Sept. 1989; Ohio Department of Transportation; and World Climate.Com)
Roads – Total 794.38 miles

State Roads …………………………………………………………………164.81 miles

County Roads…………………………………………………………….....213.70 miles

Township Roads…………………………………………………………….415.87 miles


Infrastructure/Bridges/Roads:

Bridges


Total number of bridges within the county……………………………………………..272

2003 Replacement Cost……………………………………….…...………$18,842,400.00



(Hocking County Engineers Office)

Water Supply Systems and Water Distribution Lines

Subdivision: Hocking County Engineer



Infrastructure

Replacement Cost

Total (Units)

Water Supply Systems

N/A

0

Water Distribution

$207,000

1 Thousand Linear Feet

Subdivision: Village of Laurelville



Infrastructure

Replacement Cost

Total (Units)

Water Supply Systems

$ 600,000

1

Water Distribution

$1,260,000

18 Thousand Linear Feet

Subdivision: City of Logan



Infrastructure

Replacement Cost

Total (Units)

Water Supply Systems

$10,000,000

13

Water Distribution

$ 8,000,000

158 Thousand Linear Feet

Subdivision: Village of Murray City



Infrastructure

Replacement Cost

Total (Units)

Water Supply Systems

$ 208,000

1

Water Distribution

$1,015,000

21 Thousand Linear Feet

(Ohio Public Works Commission Capital Improvement Reports)
LE-AX Water District has approximately 60 miles of water distribution lines and Old Straitsville Water Association, Inc. has approximately 75 miles of water distribution lines in Hocking County. These companies supply water to rural areas in the County.

1   2   3   4   5   6


The database is protected by copyright ©essaydocs.org 2016
send message

    Main page