Human Rights in a Modern World (H) Midterm Exam Study Guide 2015-16 Exam Format: (150 points)



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Human Rights in a Modern World (H) Midterm Exam Study Guide 2015-16
Exam Format: (150 points)

  • 75 multiple choice questions (1 pt. each)

  • 1 source analysis (15 pts.)

  • 2 short answer (10 pts. each)

  • 1 formal essay (40 pts.)


Units of study on the exam:

  • Unit 1: Introduction to Human Rights: Enlightenment & French Revolution (Ch.19, Sec.2 and p.476-477 of Sec. 3; Ch.21, all sections)

  • Unit 2: Industrialization & Imperialism (Ch.22, all sections; Ch.26, Sec. 1-3)

  • Unit 3: World War I (Ch. 27, Sec.1, 2, 3, and 5)

  • Unit 4: Russian Revolution and Rise of Dictators (Ch.27, Sec.4; Ch.28, Sec.3 and 4)

  • Unit 5: World War II (Ch.29, Sec.4; Ch.30, all)


Key terms, people, and ideas to review:

Enlightenment and French Rev.

  • Rights vs. privileges

  • Universal human right

  • UDHR

  • Medieval vs. Enlightenment worldviews

  • Divine right theory

  • Absolute monarchy

  • Thomas Hobbes

  • John Locke

  • Social contract theory

  • Tabula rasa

  • Philosophe

  • Salon

  • Diderot

  • Montesquieu

  • Voltaire

  • Causes of the French Revolution

  • Palace of Versailles

  • Estate System

  • Tithe

  • Bourgeoisie

  • Taille

  • King Louis XVI

Industrialization & Imperialism

  • Village life before the Industrial Revolution

  • Domestic system

  • Enclosure movement

  • Why did the Industrial Revolution begin in Great Britain?

  • Factory system

  • Interchangeable parts

  • Division of labor

World War I

  • “Great War”

  • Militarism

  • Alliances

  • Imperialism

  • Nationalism

  • Triple Entente

  • Triple Alliance

  • “Powder Keg” of Europe

  • Slavic nationalism

  • Archduke Franz Ferdinand

  • Sarajevo

  • Black Hand

  • Gavrilo Princip

  • Austria-Hungary’s ultimatum

  • Mobilization

  • Tsar Nicholas II of Russia

  • Kaiser Wilhelm II of Germany

  • Central Powers

  • Allied Powers

Russian Rev. and Rise of Dictators

  • Impact of WWI on Russia

  • Capitalism

  • Socialism

  • Communism

  • Tsar Nicholas II and Alexandra

  • Rasputin

  • February (March) Revolution

  • Provisional government

  • Soviet

  • Bolshevik

  • Alexander Kerensky

  • Vladimir Lenin

  • October (November) / Bolshevik Revolution

World War II

  • Flaws in the Treaty of Versailles

  • Italy’s conquest of Ethiopia



  • Hitler’s actions leading up to WWII

  • Remilitarizing the Rhineland

  • Alliance with Austria (Anschluss)

  • Sudeten Crisis

  • Munich Conference

  • Neville Chamberlain

  • Appeasement

  • Failure of the League of Nation’s sanctions

  • Axis Powers

  • Allied Powers

  • Nazi-Soviet Pact

  • Invasion of Poland

  • Blitzkrieg

  • Sitzkrieg

  • Invasion of Scandinavia, the “Low Countries,” France

  • Battle of Britain

  • London Blitz

  • Winston Churchill






  • Marie Antoinette

  • Estates-General

  • Cahiers

  • National Assembly

  • Tennis Court Oath

  • Storming the Bastille

  • “Great Fear”

  • Moderate reforms

  • Declaration of the Rights of Man and Citizen

  • Women’s March on Versailles

  • Changes to the Church

  • Political spectrum – radical, liberal, moderate, conservative, reactionary

  • Émigré

  • National Convention

  • Republic

  • Suffrage

  • Death of King Louis XVI

  • Jacobin (radical) takeover

  • France’s war with Europe

  • Committee of Public Safety

  • Reign of Terror



  • Assembly line

  • Partnership

  • Corporation

  • Middle class vs. working class

  • Benefits/drawbacks of industrialization

  • “White Man’s Burden”

  • Causes and effects of imperialism

  • Social Darwinism



  • Schlieffen Plan

  • Two-front war

  • Eastern Front

  • Western Front

  • Stalemate

  • Trench warfare/trench life

  • Stalemate

  • No Man’s Land

  • Aircraft

  • Poison gas

  • Machine guns

  • Grenades

  • Tanks

  • Flamethrowers

  • Trench mortars

  • Christmas Truce

  • Battle of Verdun

  • Battle of the Somme

  • War of attrition



  • Civil War – Reds vs. Whites

  • War communism (nationalization)

  • Lenin’s N.E.P.

  • “Dictatorship of the proletariat”

  • Stalin’s rise to power

  • Totalitarianism

  • Five-year plans

  • Collectivization

  • Kulaks

  • Purges

  • Socialist realism

  • Comintern

  • Gulag



  • Anti-Semitism

  • Holocaust

  • Genocide



  • Ghetto

  • Concentration vs. death camps

  • Auschwitz

  • Final Solution

  • “This Way for the Gas…”

  • “One Survivor Remembers”

  • Japans role in World War I

  • Japan’s relationship with the West

  • Emperor Hirohito

  • Greater East Asia Co-Prosperity Sphere

  • Japanese imperialism (in Korea, China/Manchuria, etc.) and motives for expansion

  • Social/political tensions in post-war Japan

  • U.S. sanctions against Japan

  • Pearl Harbor

  • Japanese internment

  • Nikkei/Issei/Nissei





  • Conscription

  • Guillotine

  • Maximilien Robespierre

  • Directory

  • Napoleon Bonaparte

  • Coup d’état

  • Plebiscite

  • Napoleonic Code

  • Napoleonic Wars

  • Battle of Trafalgar

  • Continental System

  • Grand Empire

  • Nationalism

  • Napoleon’s invasion of Russia

  • “Scorched earth” policy

  • The “Hundred Days”

  • Battle of Waterloo

  • Napoleon’s legacy

  • Congress of Vienna

  • Prince Klemens von Metternich

  • Compensation, legitimacy, balance of power

  • Concert of Europe



  • Colony

  • Protectorate

  • Sphere of influence

  • Berlin Conference



  • “Scramble for Africa”

  • Henry Stanley

  • King Leopold II

  • Belgian Congo

  • Imperialism in Meiji Japan

  • Matthew Perry



  • Role of women

  • India’s participation in WWI

  • Propaganda

  • U-Boats

  • Unrestricted submarine warfare

  • Lusitania

  • Zimmermann Telegram

  • Woodrow Wilson

  • Fourteen Points

  • Self-determination

  • Armistice

  • Reparations

  • The “Big Three”

  • David Lloyd George

  • Georges Clemenceau

  • League of Nations

  • Treaty of Versailles

  • Mandates



  • Life in Italy post-WWI

  • Benito Mussolini – “Il Duce”

  • Fascism

  • Black Shirts

  • March on Rome

  • Corporate State

  • Syndicates

  • Life in Germany post-WWI

  • Weimar Republic

  • Adolf Hitler – “Der Fuhrer”

  • Nazi Party

  • Brownshirts

  • Nuremberg Laws

  • Kristallnacht

  • “Nazi Olympics”



  • Executive Order 9066

  • Franklin Roosevelt

  • Propaganda techniques



  • Invasion of the Soviet Union

  • Scorched earth policy

  • Battle of Stalingrad

  • Invasion of Italy

  • Mussolini’s downfall

  • D-Day

  • Battle of the Bulge

  • Hitler’s suicide

  • Victory in Europe Day

  • Kamikaze

  • Battle of Midway

  • Island-hopping

  • Manhattan Project

  • Yalta

  • Potsdam

  • Harry S Truman

  • Atomic bombs

  • U.S. ultimatum to Japan

  • Hiroshima and Nagasaki

  • Victory in Japan Day

  • Effects and aftermath of World War II


Source Analysis/Short Answer Topics: Since the topic of the essay relates to World War II in the Pacific, there will be no sources or short answer questions about that topic. Instead, the questions for this section will be drawn from other units and will likely involve broad concepts and connections between topics in different units. The best way to prepare for this section is simply to study the main terms, concepts, etc. for each unit listed above.
Formal Essay Topic: You will write a formal essay responding to the question: “Was it necessary to drop the atomic bombs on Japan?” In addition to handouts from class, you will also receive three sources with varying perspectives about the decision to drop the bombs (see attached). You will be able to reference these perspectives in addition to the “Manhattan Project” and “Eight Hundred Meters from the Hypocenter” handouts while writing the essay. The essay will be graded according to the following criteria:

    • Thesis (Did you take a clear position with two or three supporting arguments?)

    • Comprehensiveness (Did you incorporate information from multiple sources?)

    • Support (Did you support your thesis with accurate and relevant information?)

    • Organization (Did you organize your ideas logically and effectively?)

    • Clarity/Fluency (Did you express your ideas clearly and fluently?)


Extra Credit: If you attended the screening of Gisela’s Legacy, you will receive one extra credit point on the exam. If you attend an SMP presentation, hand in your signed form with a summary of the presentation and you will receive one extra credit point on the exam.
Date and time of exam: _______________________________


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