History for the 21st Century



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QHTA State Conference

Saturday 25 June 2016

Brisbane Girls Grammar School

History for the 21st Century”?




To register go to www.qhta.com.au

Costs:

Members (Individual or Institutional) Registration up to 120km away from Brisbane $165.00 per person

Member (Individual or Institutional) Registration over 120km from Brisbane $132.00 per person

Non-member Registration $242.00

Primary School Teacher Registration $110.00

Student or Unwaged $ 55.00

Invited Presenters No charge



QHTA CONFERENCE PROGRAM - 25H JUNE 2016

Brisbane Girls Grammar School

8am-8:30am

REGISTRATON

(Tea and coffee)



8:30-8:45am

GENERAL MATTERS

Introduction and Welcome Acknowledgement of Country Launch of National History Challenge Competitions Dr Cowie Award



8:45-9:55am

KEYNOTE ADDRESS

Associate Professor Tom Stevenson

*Mass Migration from Europe to the Near East: The Experience of the Early Hellenistic Age (4th to 3rd Century BC)*





Primary

Middle Years

Museums

Modern History

Ancient History

Pedagogy and IT

Pedagogy and IT

Pedagogy and IT

10am-11am

1a

Steve Box

The Colonial Network - a historical connection



Clair Monnickendam

Developing historical understanding through personal histories.



Short tips

1b

Kay Bishop

Hooked on History



Workshop

1c

Margaret Fleming

Indigenous rights in the 20th century



Workshop

1d

Dr Brian Hoepper

A call for a ‘more compelling history’



Workshop

1e

Emeritus Professor Bob Milns

How the Greeks and Romans thought history should be written and what its value is.



Lecture



1f

Sue Burvill-Shaw

Historiography in the History classroom



Workshop

1g

Sasha McDonald

Literacy in History



Workshop


1h

Michelle Brown

Using reflection in a History classroom



Workshop


11am-11:30am

MORNING TEA

11:30AM-12:25PM

2a

Belinda Daly and Daley Donnelly

Time, Place and People - Exploring heritage sites through theatre



Workshop

2b

Kira Sampson

Big History - the basics and benefits of an interdisciplinary course



Lecture

2c
Rebecca Smith, RD Milns Antiquities Museum

and others

Digital Antiquity



Workshop; Round table discussion

2d

Assoc Prof Andrew Bonnell

Recent research on Nazism and War



Lecture


2e

Assoc Prof Tom Stevenson

Julius Caesar in film



Lecture

2f

Jacques du Toit

Taking charge of your own professional learning through social media



Workshop

2g

Dr Naomi Barnes

Writing history in the 21st century



Lecture


2 h

Scott Kerr

Are you're thinking what I'm thinking? Cognitive psychology in the History classroom



Workshop



12:30-1:15pm

LUNCH

1:15-2:10pm


3a

Sally Lawrence

Cross cultures: Hidden Histories



Workshop

3b
Debra Sulway

Using cartoons in the History classroom



Workshop

3c

Justyne Wilson

Pedagogy and museums



Lecture


3 d

Dr Annie Pohlman

Mapping the normalisation of torture in Indonesian history: the New Order regime (1965-98)



Lecture

3e

Darlene Hill

Hatshepsut - Still to be maligned in the 21st century?



Lecture

3f

Greg Lally

Terrorism in the 21st century



Kelly Allgood

"Miss can we do more Otzi?"



Jacques du Toit

History and social media collide



15 minute tips

3g

Joshua Long

#history. How ICT can be useful in the history classroom



Workshop

3 h

Angela Casey

Objects and dialogue: critical thinking and haptic learning



Workshop

2:15-3:15pm

4a

Helen Hennessy

What do we do with History in H & SSP - 6/7?



Workshop

4b

Natalie Baker

Don't forget Australia: Why the rising sun still shines over Villers-Bretonneux



Lecture


4c

Michelle Gault

A night at the museum



Lecture

4d

Adrian Skerritt

The contested origins of Israel



Lecture


4e

Michael Cocks

Representative-ness and source evaluation



Seminar

4f

Sarah Gunn

Website design: engaging, effective, enlightening



Workshop


4g

Ian Burgess

"Hot History in a warming world"



Workshop

4h

Ryan Slavin

Engaging and empowering students through choice in Year 8 Medieval Studies



Workshop


3:15-4pm

Wine and Cheese

Facilitated by QHTA EXECUTIVE MEMBERS






Keynote Speaker: Associate Professor Tom Stevenson
*Mass Migration from Europe to the Near East: The Experience of the Early Hellenistic Age (4th to 3rd Century BC)*

This paper looks at the heavy migration from Europe (Greece, Macedonia, and Gaul) into the Near East which took place in the wake of Alexander the Great's conquests.  It emerges that there are both similarities and differences between the ancient experience and the migration waves of recent years from the Near East into Europe.  On one hand, the number of people migrating was high in relative terms, and economic imbalance was a crucial factor.  In addition, there was considerable friction between migrants and natives, so that distinct enclaves or districts developed, especially in the great cities of the period.  On the other hand, the movement was from west to east rather than from east to west; the migrants often had great power as part of the political, bureaucratic or military elites of their new homes; there was no injunction on the migrants to be grateful to or respectful of the natives, since they were there by right of conquest; it is debatable whether the friction that developed was a matter of 'racism' as commonly understood today, or whether it was more a matter of national and social divisions, e.g. between elites and lower social classes; and one's social class could transcend one's origins, so that (e.g.) elites of the West and the East had a permeability and a mobility which are often surprising to modern commentators.  Furthermore, desperate or powerless refugees in need of food, clothing, shelter and medical care are hard to find in the ancient world.  If, for instance, you were forced from your land by an aggressive neighbour, you took it for granted that you would have to fight for new land for your people.  This was how Galatia came into being in 279 BC.  The weak were simply crushed.  But if the differences are profound, and the experience of the ancient world carries many bleak lessons, given the unforgiving realities of highly competitive military and social systems, it is perhaps the biggest difference of all that offers some hope for a more positive outcome in the 21st Century: the ancients would have found much of today's Western rhetoric, featuring calls for new attitudes and policies that derive from underlying humanitarian and egalitarian ideas, very difficult - even impossible - to understand.  Opposing arguments - especially to the ear of a Classicist - tend to resemble the fierce adherence to hierarchy and competition which characterises the ancient world.



Associate Professor Tom Stevenson, is a Senior Lecturer in Classics and Ancient History and Director of Teaching and Learning at  The University of Queensland. Associate Professor Tom Stevenson’s research interests include war and Australian society, sports history, masculinity, and education. Dr  Stevenson's research interests include Roman politics and political ideology of the late Republic and early Empire, the careers of Cicero and Caesar, the first two centuries of emperor worship at Rome. His current research projects include a book on the history and significance of the idea of the Roman emperor as Pater Patriae (Father of the Fatherland), and an edited collection of conference papers on the ancient Olympic Games. Dr Stevenson is a member of the Australasian Society for Classical Studies (ASCS), and a member of the QHTA Executive where he has co-presented the Ancient Student Seminars for a number of years.

1a Steve Box

The Colonial Network - a historical connection

30 minute workshop
What would early colonial life look like if it occurred during the digital age? A reward for capture poster placed on the Governor’s website, the local clergy bemoan the heathen ways of those in the community in a facebook rant, the local pastoralist looks for labour with an advertisement on Seek.com, a free settler posts pictures of his new house on Instagram #givemeland, the trial of a sheep thief is live tweeted by the local press, the blacksmith launches his youtube channel to promote his skills and wares?

This is a Year 5 history unit inquiring into relationships and social hierarchies that existed in Early Colonial Australia. Through the eyes of different members of the newly established colony, students bring history to life and contrast these connections and perspectives with a current twist. This unit is an exemplar of how interdisciplinary approaches to learning allow the historical content to come to life, the skills to be applied and the engagement to be rich and purposeful.



Steve is currently the Head of Preparatory Years (K-6) at Toowoomba Anglican College and Preparatory School, where he serves as the leader of teaching and learning, among other responsibilities. With a strong background working in inquiry-learning environments, his focus is now on bringing learning to life through capturing a sense of purpose for students in their learning, connecting their classroom learning with experiences of value beyond the campus gates.

Clair Monnickendam

Developing historical understanding through personal histories

30 minute workshop
This workshop includes a short activity for use with junior classes (7-9) which focuses on evidence and developing historical questions which interrogate evidence/sources.  While this session refers mainly to activities used in middle school classes, it would be equally beneficially for teachers of primary history.
Clair Monnickendam has been teaching History and English since graduating from QUT in 2009. Clair is humanities co-ordinator at Balmoral State High School.

1b Kay Bishop

Hooked on History

60 minute interactive workshop
This workshop looks at ways to engage students in meaningful history activities from the very first lesson, so that they can see history as an interesting and fun subject. It looks at using a “hook” to “reel” students in so that they can see they can do history well and that it is not just reading textbooks. The session will use examples from the Years 7 and 8 sections of the Australian Curriculum but the strategy can be applied to any year level.
Kay Bishop is an experienced History teacher and was Head of Social Sciences and Head of Curriculum at Frawley College and then Head of Social Sciences at John Paul College. After a very temporary retirement in 2007, Kay became Project Officer for a national curriculum project and worked on several other projects before taking up teaching contracts at Somerville House from 2009 to 2011. She has been President and an Executive Member of QHTA for many years and was President of HTAA and then Executive Officer of HTAA for several years.  Kay was a member of the History Sub-Committee for the Board of Secondary School Studies, later QSA and now QCAA for several decades and was Chairperson for a number of years.  She is currently the Assistant Manager for History for Curriculum into the Classroom (C2C) with the Department of Education and Training.
1c Margaret Fleming

Indigenous rights in the 20th century

60 minute interactive workshop
In the 1960s and 70s Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples used a range of methods in their struggle for rights and freedoms in Australia. From going on strike, to sending a petition to the Queen and ultimately changing the Constitution, these significant moments in Australian history have been documented in the records held by the National Archives of Australia. In this workshop participants will investigate a range of primary sources from the National Archives’ collection and discover new ways to use archival records in the classroom. This workshop is specifically for AC history hence Secondary: Year 9 – 12 however all welcome.

Margaret Fleming has worked in education and public programs at a range of cultural institutions in Canberra and is currently at the National Archives of Australia. She has taught secondary history and politics and delights in heritage/museum learning experiences that connect with the classroom and engage student learners.

1d Dr Brian Hoepper

A call for a ‘more compelling history’

Workshop
Participants in this workshop will respond to this call by Linda Levstik and Keith Barton for a ‘more compelling history’:

If history helps us think about who we are and to picture possible futures, we cannot afford a history curriculum mired in trivia... Instead, we need a vibrant history curriculum that engages children in investigating significant themes and questions, with people, their values, and the choices they make as the central focus … enduring themes and questions that humans have struggled with over time … . (Levstik & Barton 2011, Doing History: Investigating with children in elementary and middle schools. p.3)

 

Working with the 7-10 Australian Curriculum: History, the workshop will focus on (i) how to recognise and select topics that offer the most potential for a ‘compelling history’ and (ii) how to plan the teaching and learning of the topic to realise that potential.



 

The 7-10 Australian Curriculum: History provides for twelve ‘depth studies’ over the four years. Eight of those offer a choice of topics for the depth studies, and the four others still offer the choice of focus and approach within the mandated depth study. Teachers can choose wisely to avoid ‘trivia’ and to embrace ‘compelling’.


Dr Brian Hoepper has taught history in secondary schools and history curriculum at university. He has also been involved in syllabus development, PD presentation and textbook writing. Brian was contracted by ACARA to help develop the Australian Curriculum: History. His most recent publication is ‘Teaching Humanities and Social Sciences’ (Cengage 2014), a tertiary text co-edited with Professor Rob Gilbert.
1e Emeritus Professor Bob Milns

How the Greeks and Romans thought history should be written and what its value is.

60 minute lecture
(Detail to come)


Emeritus Professor Robert (Bob) Milns AM retired from the Chair of Classics & Ancient History in the University of Queensland in 2003, an appointment he had held since 1970. He is currently an Honorary Research Consultant in the discipline, lecturing and supervising undergraduate and postgraduate students. His academic interests and publications deal with the culture of both ancient Greece and Rome. He is involved with several cultural organisations concerned with the Mediterranean world, having held or holding positions of President or Patron of several of these and also is Patron of the Brisbane Symphony Orchestra. For the past 17 years he has acted as leader of tours to most of the countries bordering the Mediterranean Sea. In 1997 he was appointed a Member of the Order of Australia in recognition of his services to education and to the community at large and in 2003 received a Centenary Medal. In the same year he received a Niki award for Philhellenism from the Australian Hellenic Council. More recently, in December 2012, the University of Queensland awarded him the degree of Honorary Doctor of Letters in recognition of his distinguished career.

1f Sue Burvill-Shaw

Historiography in the History classroom

60 minute lecture with questions
What does the Queensland syllabus mean by historiography and how can we take an historiographical approach to teaching in both the middle years and senior classroom. This workshop will explore ways it might be introduced with students in years 7 to 12. Resources and unit outlines will be posted on the QHTA members site after the Conference. Two lucky attendees will take away a new history textbook and a usb of all resources referred to in the workshop.

Sue Burvill-Shaw has recently worked as Head of Department at St Aidan’s Anglican Girls’ School and a classroom teacher since 1982. She is the immediate Past-President of QHTA and has tutored at QUT. Her workshops are characterised by an emphasis on practical, classroom tested strategies grounded in relevant theory.  Sue was co-ordinating author of the Jacaranda World History Atlas and is currently working with Nelson on a Modern History text. Sue has presented workshops at state, national and international Teachers’ Conferences and is widely published.
1g Sasha McDonald

Literacy in History

60 minute interactive workshop
This session aims to offer attendees a range of practical strategies, lesson segments, and scaffolding tools to incorporate into the History classroom in order to target and enhance the literacy capabilities of students. With a clear focus on building students’ literacy capacity in the Australian Curriculum standards and descriptors, it has become increasingly important to embed a range of skills and drills into everyday practice that enables a wide range of students to engage with the content. Some of these activities are designed to support the engagement of students with lower literacy skills, enabling them to remain engaged in a subject that relies heavily on reading and writing abilities. At the other end of the achievement gap, this presentation will also explain how to use certain activities to further extend students in the Upper Bands of the class, challenging them to improve the quality of their written responses, and use more difficult sources when researching. Strategies mentioned include: Reciprocal Reading, Art and Science of Teaching - Design Questions 1 and 2, Rigorous Reading, Three Column Exemplars, Scales and Rubrics.

For the past three years Sasha has taught a range of English and Humanities classes from Grade 8 through to Grade 12, including Junior Secondary Extension classes and Senior Ancient History and English. Since joining the school she has acted as curriculum leader for several year levels, and has previously held the position of Acting Head of Humanities.

1h Michelle Brown

Using reflection in a History classroom

Lecture with questions
The twenty-first century thinker is a reflective thinker.  This type of thinking is the least well explained or understood by many teachers. This session aims to promote discussion about how history teachers teach students to be reflective and shows one teacher’s journey into doing that more effectively.  Workshop participants will receive a snapshot of what that might look like via proficiency scales for students from Years 8-12 and possibly Year 7.  This journey is best described by Michelle as:  “Some of the big conversations in pedagogy at the moment is working out ways that we can help our students develop ‘growth mindsets’.  In history we are well placed to help develop growth mindsets in our students via the requirement to develop critical reflection skills.  When I first started teaching the current modern history syllabus – in its trial phase in 2001, reflection was about what I needed to see from students – in many ways it was helping me help them.  I still believe that that is an important and useful benefit, however, I now believe that effective critical reflection, which helps students help themselves, is the key to lifting student performance.” 

What does your journey look like?



Michelle Brown is a long time executive member of QHTA and a popular presenter at QHTA conferences. The work produced by her students is notable for the depth of historical understanding demonstrated within it. Michelle’s workshops provide teachers with food for thought and ideas for practical activities to further learning goals in the History classroom.
2a Belinda Daly and Daley Donnelly

60 minute interactive workshop

Time, Place and People - Exporting heritage sites through theatre
Time, Place and People – Today’s students exploring heritage sites in Moreton Bay through Theatre-in-Education.

Much of our historical studies involve communicating about distant times and events. Creating the forum whereby students can connect to the past in both intellectual and emotional ways is the aim of the work created through a partnership between Moreton Bay EEC and Qld Parks and Wildlife Service. Theatre in Education uses the pedagogy of theatre to engage students in the stories of real and ordinary people and their experiences at local heritage sites in Moreton Bay. In this session we will unpack ways in which students are involved in exploring the sites, interrogating the material and reflecting on their understandings. We will also expand on how these learning experiences allow students to consider history from a number of perspectives and how it can inform our future.



Daley Donnelly is a rare breed, working in Theatre-In-Education for 30 years, as well as working as an actor and a ranger! Belinda Daly has moved from Primary Teacher to Ranger to her current position as an Environmental Educator at Moreton Bay Environmental Education Centre. Hannah Rode-Bramanis is an experienced Theatre-In-Education actor and is also a teacher.
2b Kira Sampson

Big History - the basics and benefits of an interdisciplinary course

60 minute lecture with questions
This presentation will include a basic introduction to the Big History course developed by David Christian at Macquarie University for those new to the subject. This incredibly well resourced and completely free subject, now taught at hundreds of schools and universities worldwide, has proven to be intrinsically motivating for both students and teachers. The aim of the presentation is then to start a discussion of the benefits of this style of interdisciplinary course – it is essentially ‘Big History Big Science’ and how the students benefit from this 21st Century ‘real world’ and integrated approach to both subjects.

Kira Sampson is an Australian Curriculum History and Modern History teacher at Somerville House who has taught Big History, with her Science team-teacher, Alana Murray, since the large pilot in 2013.
2c Rebecca Smith

Digital Antiquity

60 minute interactive workshop
The emergence of a wide range of digital technologies in the 21st century has radically changed the way that museums engage with their audiences and provided new opportunities for educational experiences beyond the museum space. This round table discussion of conference delegates led by the RD Milns Antiquities Museum will explore how various forms of digital media produced and offered by museums can be used in the classroom. Discussion topics will include high resolution digital photography and online collection databases, 3D scanning and printing, and virtual classrooms and virtual museums.

Rebecca Smith is the Engagement Officer at the RD Milns Antiquities Museum, and has worked extensively with the Museum in the past as a tour guide. Rebecca completed a Master of Philosophy in Classics and Ancient History in 2013 and since then worked at both the University of Queensland and the University of New England as a Sessional Academic. She is currently studying for her Graduate Diploma in Museum Studies with Deakin University.


2d Assoc. Prof. Andrew Bonnell

Recent research on Nazism and War

60 minute lecture with questions
The history of the Second World War and the political history of Nazi Germany were treated as largely separate topics for decades. Increasingly, researchers are realising that an understanding of the course of the military history requires an appreciation of the nature of Nazi ideology and political practice.

The paper will discuss the place of war on Hitler's ideology, the controversy over the role of the German Army in the crimes of the Nazi regime, the nature of the campaign against the Soviet Union as an ideological and racial war, and the nature of the German population's role in the war.



Andrew Bonnell is Associate Professor in History at the University of Queensland. His publications include The People’s Stage in Imperial Germany (2005), Shylock in Germany (2008) and An American Witness in Nazi Frankfurt: The Diaries of Robert W. Heingartner, 1928-1937 (ed. 2011), and numerous articles on German history.
2e Assoc Prof Tom Stevenson

Julius Caesar in film

60 minute lecture with questions
Receptions of Julius Caesar have been studied in growing breadth and depth in recent years, but there has been no systematic attempt to analyse portrayals of Caesar in film.  Maria Wyke has discussed two or three relevant films in her Julius Caesar in Western Culture (2006) and Caesar: A Life in Western Culture (2008), but there is no chapter on film in (e.g.) Miriam Griffin’s Companion to Julius Caesar (2009).  My aim is to employ a sample of Caesar films, from Enrico Guazzoni’s Caius Julius Caesar (1914) to several Cold War products and HBO’s Rome TV series (2005-7), in order to demonstrate how their depictions of Caesar promote controversial political, social and other agendas.

Associate Professor Tom Stevenson is a Lecturer in Classics and Ancient History at  The University of Queensland.  His research interests include Roman politics and political ideology of the late Republic and early Empire, the careers of Cicero and Caesar, and the first two centuries of emperor worship at Rome.  His current research projects include a book on the history and significance of the idea of the Roman emperor as Pater Patriae (Father of the Fatherland).  He is Vice-President of the Australasian Society for Classical Studies (ASCS), and a member of the QHTA Executive where he has co-presented the Ancient History Student Seminars for a number of years.

2f Jacques du Toit

Taking charge of your own professional learning through social media

60 minute interactive workshop
New technologies and social media are driving changes with regards to information, learning, creation and sharing. The need for educators to become 21st-century learners thus requires a fundamental adjustment in the way we approach our own professional development. This dynamic session will focus on practical examples from the classroom, using new technology and social media; ideas on how to take control of your own professional development and how we can support one another as professional educators within an advancing digital framework. The ultimate goal is to better serve our modern learners, and to this we need to start with how we learn and connect.

Jacques du Toit is Head of Humanities at an Independent College on the Fraser Coast. He teaches both Modern and Ancient history, and is a QCAA panellist. He has presented at various conference like EduTECH, Education Nation in Sydney, QUT Engage Summit, EdCamp QLD and is a Google Certified Innovator.
2g Naomi Barnes

Writing history in the 21st century

60 minute lecture with questions
This lecture will look at a challenge and an opportunity facing writing History in the 21st Century. The challenge is philosophical, exploring questions of perspective and voice in writing up research. The opportunity is practical, exploring what historical genres looks like in the 21st century with the proliferation of social media (especially blogging). The lecture will invite listeners to consider the two issues in writing History and enter into a discussion about the future of the extended written response.

Dr Naomi Barnes is a lecturer in History and Geography curriculum at Griffith University. Her research involves exploring genre as activism and as a method for informing research in education. Before moving to academia, Naomi was a Modern History teacher in government, Catholic and Independent schools.

2h Scott Kerr

Are you're thinking what I'm thinking? Cognitive psychology in the History classroom

60 minute interactive workshop
In order to understand the past and work with historical sources, memory of relevant content is vital. This presentation will guide you through some of the insights and techniques from cognitive psychology, which will allow your students to understand and retain key historical content effectively. More broadly, this workshop will reveal how principles of cognitive psychology can aid your teaching practice and enhance student results, providing practical applications of these ideas for both classroom and assessment use.

For over fifteen years, Scott has taught History and Economics at a variety of independent schools in Queensland, New South Wales and the United Kingdom. His current studies in psychology have led to an interest in the application of cognitive science to classroom teaching, in particular, the role of memory in effective learning. Since 2011, Scott has taught at St. John’s Anglican College, Forest Lake.

3a Sally Lawrence

Cross cultures: Hidden Histories

60 minute interactive poster workshop

Crossing Cultures is a professional development program for school teachers and staff looking at the history of Australia from an Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander perspective.  This interactive poster workshop explores our shared history and encourages educators to consider a future perspective.

Increasing knowledge among school staff of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander cultures and histories is an important part of improving learning outcomes for Indigenous students.  Crossing Cultures workshops ensure participants know why it is important to embed Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander perspectives in education, and how to do this.  Join DETE’s Indigenous Education team and explore ‘History for the 21st Century’ through an Indigenous perspective.

Sally Lawrence develops Educational experiences, resources, tours and excursions that highlight the history of Cherbourg and it’s Aboriginal community. Through the Ration Shed she has written six educational resources and units of work that are aligned to the National Curriculum. Her award winning work aims to embed a local Indigenous perspective into Queensland schools.

3b Debra Sulway

Using cartoons in the History classroom

60 minute interactive workshop
Explore how print media like cartoons and caricatures can develop historical understandings and perspectives. As a first draft of history, political cartoons are primary source documents that can help students understand issues and attitudes of the time. Billy Hughes at War is an online resource which explores the challenging years of the First World War through the lens of historic cartoons. Behind the Lines 2015 showcases contemporary political cartoons in its onsite travelling exhibition and online resource. This exhibition explores the thrills, spills and wills of the 2015 political year. Using the museum’s online resources this workshop for secondary teachers will explore ideas on how to deconstruct historic and contemporary political cartoons to analyse and understand perspectives of people and events. It relates directly to Australian Curriculum subjects of History (Years 9–12), Civics and Citizenship (Years 7-10), and Media Arts (Years 7-10).

Deborah Sulway has a background in primary education as a classroom teacher and in special education. Since leaving the classroom and moving into museum education, she has had opportunities to work with students in public programs at Australian Parliament House and to develop, deliver and evaluate education programs and products at the Museum of Australian Democracy at Old Parliament House (MOAD). Currently, she is the Manager of Learning at MOAD.
3c Justyne Wilson

Pedagogy and Museums: the unique position of museums to support object based learning

60 minute lecture with questions

The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate the wide potential of Museum and education facilities to forge pedagogical links to jointly provide new ways for students to engage in their own learning, be it within the history discipline, or across several disciplines. Museums provide a direct link with a topic or ‘the past’ which can enhance a student’s interest in and understanding of a curriculum based topic or subject. Additionally this paper will explore the museum resources and support available to teachers through examples from Pine Rivers Heritage Museum, and the ways of accessing those services.



Justyne Wilson is enthusiastic about collaborative partnerships, working with communities and innovative programming. She is experienced in cultural heritage and community-based programming in both local and state-wide organisations, and is currently the Venue Supervisor of Pine Rivers Heritage Museum, Moreton Bay Regional Council. Justyne is an active member of Museums Australia Education (Queensland) Network.
3d Dr Annie Pohlman

Mapping the normalisation of torture in Indonesian history: the New Order regime (1965-98)

60 minute lecture

Torture in Indonesia today has become normalised: it is widespread and practised routinely. Perpetrators are rarely punished, and victims have little recourse to justice. In this paper I argue that it is possible to trace the normalisation of torture in Indonesia by mapping the spread and evolution of this violence over time. By combining select statistical analyses with the historical analysis of thousands of individual case studies, this paper examines the use of these methods in mapping torture as if it were a disease.

The frequency of torture by state security personnel increased dramatically under the New Order military regime in Indonesia (1965–1998). The dataset for this project of more than 5000 individual case histories of torture includes reporting by both domestic and international human rights organisations from throughout the regime, as well as a wide range of survivor and witness testimonies. All cases have been categorised and coded for demographic information regarding victims and perpetrators, as well as data on what forms of torture were used, when and in what contexts. The descriptive mapping will provide trend lines and potential associations within the data, while cluster analyses will be applied to identify geographical and temporal groupings of persons involved in torture, types of torture, and the contexts in which the violence was used. By combining these statistical methods with a close, textual analysis of the case histories, it will be possible to build a far clearer picture of how torture developed over time in Indonesia than ever before.

Annie Pohlman is Lecturer in Indonesian studies at the University of Queensland. She is author of ‘Women, Sexual Violence and the Indonesian Killings of 1965-66’ (2015) and co-editor of ‘Genocide and Mass Atrocities in Asia: Legacies and Prevention’ (2013). Her research interests include Indonesian history, gendered experiences of violence, torture, comparative genocide studies, and testimony.
3e Darlene Hill

Hatshepsut - Still to be maligned in the 21st century

60 minute lecture with questions
Wicked stepmother, ambitious power-seeker, evil queen, disastrous military leader – these phrases have been used to describe the Pharaoh Hatshepsut. These malevolent opinions have been presented despite her leading the largest kingdom in the world during the most powerful dynasty; conducting ground breaking trade expeditions; and developing building programs were on an unprecedented scale. So how should Hatshepsut be regarded as a pharaoh in the 21st century?

Explore the primary and secondary sources available in this presentation to make a determination for yourself.



Darlene Hill is a teacher at St Luke’s Anglican School in Bundaberg She is also the State Panel Chair for Ancient History and a member of the QCAA Expert Writing Team for Ancient History .

3f Greg Lally

Terrorism in the 21st century

15 minute tip
Terrorism in the 21st century: Terrorist groups have been very effective in destabilising/spreading terror etc through methods such as bombings, suicide attacks etc, however they have been unable to reach their ultimate objectives (independence/separate state/overthrow of government) due to government response, lack of widespread support etc. Questions our Modern History students can use to utilise their skills of creative and critical thinking include: Have particular terrorist groups been effective or not? What methods have they used? What are their objectives/justification? Why they have or haven’t been successful (the WHY – reasons).

Senior School Teacher at Chancellor State College since 2008; Bowen State High 2004-2007; The Grange in Aylesbury, Buckinghamshire UK 2002-2003; Bowen State High 1996-2002

Kelly Allgood

"Miss can we do more Otzi?"

15 minute tip

History Mysteries in the Year 7 History Curriculum provide valuable opportunities to reinforce the concepts of significance and introduce interpretations and contestability. Otzi the Iceman, the oldest naturally preserved human ever found, fires up the imagination and provides students with a chance to display their critical thinking. This session shares the journey of my Year 7 class this year, learning how to take risks in the History classroom whilst using the evidence to support their interpretations.



Kelly Allgood teaches (mostly) Middle Years History at St John’s Anglican College. In 2015 she was given a Year 7 class for the first time, and began the task of overhauling the Year 7 History program.

Jacques du Toit

History and social media collide

15 minute tip
The #TweetingAztecs used Twitter to engage students in a virtual role play set in Mesoamerica during the Spanish Conquest. Students had vigorous discussions and interactions that attracted interest from all over the world and extended their learning. Also in the session I will be showcasing how different Social Media can be used to benefit senior classrooms, create connections and build positive digital citizenship.

Jacques du Toit is Head of Humanities at an Independent College on the Fraser Coast. He teaches both Modern and Ancient history, and is a QCAA panellist. He has presented at various conference like EduTECH, Education Nation in Sydney, CSA QLD, QUT Engage Summit, EdCamp QLD and is a Google Certified Innovator.

3g Joshua Long

#history. How ICT can be useful in the history classroom

60 minute interactive workshop

The explosion of Information and Communication Technology (ICT) in contemporary society is impossible for teachers to ignore. Of course, technology is no substitute for quality teaching (Cassen, 2015). However, schools have made it imperative to integrate ICT into their everyday practice. The resulting monumental changes in pedagogy impact significantly on student learning. Benefits include supporting creativity, increased collaboration, greater engagement, more on-task behaviour and better conceptual understanding (Condie & Munro, 2007). This workshop will allow participants to engage with free web-based applications, explore mobile technologies and applications over a range of devices as well as to consider formative and summative assessment options, not just for improved engagement but for purposeful learning. Participants will receive resources (handout) on where and how they are able to access these resources once they have left the presentation. Participants are asked to bring a device to participate in this workshop.



Joshua Long is the subject coordinator of Ancient History at Sheldon College in the Redlands (just outside Brisbane). He has also been responsible for equipping teachers within the College with ICT strategies to foster better engagement and critical thinking in their classrooms.This is Joshua’s third year teaching Ancient History and he is particularly interested in sharing how he engages his students using ICT to help both improve student learning and extend students.
3h Angela Casey

Objects and dialogue: critical thinking and haptic learning

60 minute lecture with questions

This session will focus on concrete methods to promote critical thinking and dialogue in the history classroom. Participants will use primary sources to explore practical approaches for teaching complex histories through dialogue and object handling. Teachers will also explore a wide range of digital resources that can build historical and visual understandings and skills. This session is practical - participants will leave with new ideas and teaching strategies.



Angela Casey is the A/g Head of Learning Services and Community Outreach at the National Museum of Australia. Prior to working in Museums, Angela was a classroom teacher in NSW. She is passionate about debunking the myth the Australian History is boring!
4a Helen Hennessy

What do we do with History in H & SSP - 6/7?

Workshop
This workshop will explore the significant changes that occur in the new Humanities and Social Sciences subject that ACARA has created for Prep-6/7 students. It will also consider the implications of these changes for the teaching of history and the importance of maintaining the teaching of historical understandings and historical skills in the primary years. It will also explore the extra material available on the ACARA website to support history teaching in the primary years and ways to meaningfully connect the history content with other sub-strands.

Helen is currently the Humanities and Social Sciences Education Officer for Brisbane Catholic Education. In this role she works closely with teachers and helps them to move from the Australian curriculum to classroom effective learning and teaching. Prior to this position, Helen was a classroom teacher of history and other subjects for more than 30 years.

4b Natalie Baker

Don't forget Australia: Why the rising sun still shines over Villers-Bretonneux

60 minute lecture with questions
Combining the themes of the 2016 National History Challenge and the 2016 Simpson Prize; this presentation will explore Australia’s involvement at Villers-Bretonneux, France, during World War I. Over 1,200 Australian lives were lost, and the geographically significant French village was saved. This session will provide teachers with practical ideas and resources that will allow students to consider whether Australia’s involvement in Villers Bretonneux was a triumph or a tragedy. It will explore how we can teach historical knowledge and skills at Year 9 using both traditional and modern teaching methodologies.

Natalie Baker is a Melbourne-based teacher and graduate of Monash University (BoA, 1996) and UTAS (BoT, 2004). A 2012 Pauline Glass scholarship recipient, Natalie studied the Holocaust at Yad Vashem, Israel. She was a 2015 History Challenge judge, and works with Project 150 trying to bring Australia’s Pacific War stories to our schools.

4c Michelle Gault

A night at the museum

60 minute lecture with questions
Research shows that students learn best when they are able to participate in authentic learning experiences but how do we do this in the History classroom? This workshop will detail the experiences of a Year 9 cohort as they journeyed together to apply their research about various aspects of World War One in order to create a “Night at the Museum” experience for fellow students and their families. The steps involved in creating this authentic experience will be outlined as well as how curriculum objectives were met in the process.

Michelle Gault is a passionate History teacher of Middle and Senior students in the Fraser Coast region. She has run workshops for her colleagues about Australian curriculum implementation and has been a lecturer and tutor at the University of Southern Queensland for the subject, History curriculum and pedagogy. Michelle is particularly excited about ensuring that students develop a great love for History and learn to value the lessons it can teach us all.
4d Adrian Skerritt

The contested origins of Israel

60 minute lecture including questions
This workshop is based upon the origins of Israel unit we teach at Centenary SHS. It will cover the years from 1880 to 1948. The course begins by exploring the claim that there existed a Jewish homeland in the ancient Near East. For many Jewish writers in the Middle Ages Jerusalem represented a spiritual idea and not necessarily a geographical area that Jewish people had to migrate to. We look at the way the modern Zionist movement faced significant Jewish opposition within Europe and was eventually given a decisive boost by the British government. The course then explores the changing British policies towards the Jewish community in the 1920s and 1930s. The last part of the course looks at the debates surrounding the Palestinian flight from their homes during the 1948 war. Did they follow directions from Arab leader to evacuate or were they driven out by a deliberate policy of ethnic cleansing?

Adrian Skerritt is the HOD of Humanities at Centenary SHS

4e Michael Cocks

Representativeness and source evaluation

60 minutes lecture with questions
Teaching source evaluation, particularly representativeness, can be challenging. However, it need not be and it can even become one of the most engaging parts of your lessons. This seminar will provide a structured approach for how to teach your students to evaluate a range of sources with an emphasis on representativeness. Attendees to this session will also receive free, ready-to-use source criticism resources for their classroom.

Michael teaches Senior History at Toowoomba Grammar School and was a 2015 finalist in the QCT Teaching Excellence Awards. He specialises in Ancient History, runs an educational History website, has over 50,000 subscribers on Flipboard and is currently co-authoring a textbook for the History Teachers’ Association of Victoria.
4f Sarah Gunn

Website design: engaging, effective, enlightening

60 minute interactive workshop
This presentation demonstrating how Weebly website design is used to inject IT and real-life relevancy into our Year 7 inquiry-based research assignment on Ancient Greek legacies. The session will include time for questions and conclude with an interactive workshop- getting you set up with Weebly.

Sarah Gunn is a Humanities teacher in the secondary school at St. Laurence’s College. With a background in both primary and secondary teaching, Sarah has taught in the UK and Australia in co-educational, single-sex, private and public school environments. Having moved from her position as the Primary School’s eLearning Co-ordinator, Sarah has now been appointed as Director of Graduate Teacher Performance and Development.

4g Ian Burgess

"Hot History in a warming world"

60 minute interactive workshop
Recent statements by Malcolm Turnbull and Barack Obama concerning the importance of STEM subjects to our economic future have raised the heat on other disciplines such as History to stay relevant in an increasingly crowded curriculum. The 21st Century Learning Design program provides a framework to guide the design of learning activities that explicitly develops the essential skills for the citizens in a complex and ever changing world. This workshop will investigate the 21CLD and identify elements of current curriculum that are providing our students with the opportunities to become critical and creative thinkers.

Ian has been HoD Humanities at Ormiston College for eight years and has been active in the implementation of the Dimensions of Learning and 21CLD frameworks and the integration of ICT’s. He remains confident that the end is not nigh for History and considers it a powerful cross curricular subject.
4h Ryan Slavin

Engaging and empowering students through choice in Year 8 Medieval Studies



Students are more inclined to be creative and engaged in their learning when restrictions to creativity are minimised and there is no 'ceiling' to what they can produce. In this workshop a complete Year 8 Medieval Studies unit of work and assessment instrument will be presented that integrates ICLT and Student Driven Decision Making into the curriculum to allow students to access the learning at differentiated levels. As a result, less stronger students are able to progress in their learning without feelings of inadequacy, while stronger students are not waiting for others at earlier levels in their learning and are able to extend themselves intrinsically without outside restrictions. Furthermore, this approach to teaching Medieval Studies offers a highly transparent mode of learning that centres on the student's metacognitive decision making and reflective consultations with their teacher to constantly assess learning progress and base further decisions in learning on their awareness of criteria expectations.

Ryan Slavin is the Head of Social Sciences and Business at Unity College on the Sunshine Coast. Ryan has worked as eLearning Coordinator in Catholic colleges in Brisbane over the past decade and has simultaneously taught History and other Humanities KLAs. 




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