History 7316: Religious Tolerance and Intolerance in Early Modern Europe



Download 112.9 Kb.
Date conversion03.05.2016
Size112.9 Kb.

History 7316: Religious Tolerance and Intolerance in Early Modern Europe







University College London

Prof. Benjamin Kaplan

Autumn 2011

25 Gordon Square, Room 307

Mon 16:00-18:00, room 101

Office Hours: Mon 15:00-16:30

Moodle materials: http://moodle.ucl.ac.uk//

& by appointment




Phone: 020 7679 1338 (x 31338)




Email: b.kaplan@ucl.ac.uk




Homepage: http://www.homepages.ucl.ac.uk/~ucrabjk/





I. Description

The subject of this course is the relations between Europe’s different religious groups – the various Christian denominations chiefly, but also Christians and Jews – in the centuries between the Protestant Reformation and the French Revolution. With the Reformation, a once-united western Christendom split into hostile, warring camps. Despite the ideals of toleration and religious freedom championed by some thinkers, actual social relations between the groups remained intensely problematic to the very end of the early modern period. Those relations will be the focus of our study.


How did ordinary people experience the religious divisions? How did they interact with one another? What were the obstacles to peaceful coexistence? Why did toleration prevail in some local communities while others descended into sectarian violence? What kinds of arrangements and accomodations did toleration entail, where it existed? Did toleration increase over time? To address these questions we will take a comparative approach, examining different parts of Europe, principally France, the Holy Roman Empire (roughly equivalent to Germany), and the Netherlands.
II. Format & Requirements

The course has no formal prerequisites, but students will be assumed to have taken the UCL History Department’s Lecture Core Course (`From the Ancient Near East to the Twenty-First Century’) or to have equivalent background knowledge of early modern Europe. Please consult the instructor if you have questions or concerns on this score.


We will meet once a week over the autumn term for 2 hours per meeting. This is a seminar-style discussion class, not a lecture. Students will be expected to devote an average of eight hours per week to reading and research for the course. For each meeting it is required that you read:


  1. All of the week’s “core readings." Items marked below with a plus sign (+) are available online through the SFX function of eUCLid, the UCL Library catalogue; to gain access to most of them you will need a UCL Computing username and password. Items marked below with an asterisk (*) will be posted online on the Moodle website for this course. All unmarked core readings (as well as all marked ones) will be available on short-term loan at the UCL Main Library, either at the Issue Desk or in the regular shelves. Please be considerate of your fellow students and return books to their proper place when you have finished using them.




  1. Some of the “further readings.” Which of these works you read each week is your choice, and a matter of library availability. Reading none, however, is not an option: these too will be discussed in class and students will be asked to provide the class with an oral precis of the item(s) they read. In a great number of cases, the further readings are not available online; you will have to use the various online library catalogues to locate them and then go to the relevant library (UCL, Senate House, BL). Most of the further readings are in English, though I have included ones in French or German when they are particularly important or when good materials in English are scarce (no one is required to read items in a language they don’t know!). For most of the weeks, I have tried to indicate some of the most valuable readings by placing them at the top of the list.


III. Assessment

The course will be assessed by two essays. Each essay will take the form of a literature review of a particular topic; a separate sheet with detailed instructions will be distributed in class and posted on the Moodle website for the course. The essays must be c.2,500 words each (including all the text in the footnotes/endnotes, even if they are just references, but excluding bibliography). All essays must be well presented and clear. Please use double-spacing, 10, 11 or 12 point text, and leave margins of at least 2.5cm. Proof-read your work carefully and do not rely entirely on spell-checkers – they can introduce mistakes, particularly with proper names. Please put your name on your essay. A copy will be returned to you with corrections and feedback.


Deadlines: the first essay should be handed in by 4 p.m. on Wednesday 16 November. This is an unofficial deadline that I have set to help you to space out your essay writing assignments and so that you can receive feedback which might be useful for your second essay. You will not be penalized if you choose not to meet this deadline, but you will probably not receive timely feedback. The official deadline for both essay is 4 p.m. on Monday 9 January 2012. You will be penalised if you fail to meet this deadline unless you have been granted an extension by the Chair of the Board of Examiners.
For Affiliate students leaving in December only: The unofficial deadline for the first essay is Wednesday 16 November. I strongly recommend that you submit your first essay by this date so that I have an opportunity to give you some tutorial feedback before you write your second essay. However, you will not be penalized if you choose not to meet this deadline. The official deadline for both essays is 4 p.m. on Friday 16 December 2011. You will be penalized if you fail to meet this deadline unless you have been granted an extension by the Chair of the Board of Examiners.
IV. Schedule of Classes & Readings

Week 1 Historiography: Traditions & Challenges
No core readings
Further readings:
Benjamin J. Kaplan. "Coexistence, Conflict, and the Practice of Toleration." In A Companion to the Reformation World, edited by R. Po-chia Hsia, 486-505. Oxford: Blackwell, 2003.

Thomas Max Safley, “Multiconfessionalism: A Brief Introduction,” in Safley, ed., A Companion to Multiconfessionalism in the Early Modern World. Leiden: Brill, 2011. Pp. 1-19.

Bob Scribner, “Preconditions of tolerance and intolerance in sixteenth-century Germany,” in Ole Peter Grell & Bob Scribner, eds., Tolerance and intolerance in the European Reformation (Cambridge, 1996), pp. 32-47.

John Coffey. "Milton, Locke and the New History of Toleration." Modern Intellectual History 5 (2008): 619-32.

Thomas A. Brady, “Limits of Religious Violence in Early Modern Europe,” in Kaspar von Greyerz and Kim Siebenhüner, eds., Religion und Gewalt. Konflikte, Rituale, Deutungen (1500-1800). Göttingen: Vandenhoeck & Ruprecht, 2006. Pp. 125-151.
Butterfield, Herbert. The Whig Interpretation of History (1950)

Butterfield, Herbert. "Toleration in Early Modern Times." Journal of the History of Ideas 38 (1977): 573-84.

Lecler, Joseph. Toleration and the Reformation, 2 vols., especially the conclusion in vol. 2 (pp. 475-506)

Acton, John Emerich Edward Dalberg. The History of Freedom and Other Essays. London: Macmillan, 1919

Jordan, Wilbur Kitchener. The Development of Religious Toleration in England. 4 vols. Cambridge, Mass.: Harvard University Press, 1932-1940.

Kamen, Henry. The Rise of Toleration (1967)

Kaplan, Benjamin J. "`Dutch' religious tolerance: celebration and revision." In Calvinism and Religious Toleration in the Dutch Golden Age, ed. R. Po-chia Hsia and H. F. K. Van Nierop, 8-26. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2002.

Kaplan, Benjamin J. Divided by Faith: Religious Conflict and the Practice of Toleration in Early Modern Europe (Cambridge, Mass., 2007)

John Marshall, John Locke, Toleration and Early Enlightenment Culture (Cambridge, 2006)

Alexandra Walsham, Charitable hatred: Tolerance and intolerance in England, 1500-1700 (Manchester, 2006)

C. Scott Dixon, Dagmar Freist, and Mark Greengrass, eds. Living with religious diversity in early modern Europe. Farnham: Ashgate, 2009.

Stuart B. Schwartz. All can be saved: religious tolerance and salvation in the Iberian Atlantic world. New Haven: Yale University Press, 2008.


Grell, Ole Peter & Bob Scribner, eds., Tolerance and intolerance in the European Reformation, especially pp. 1-47

Grell, Ole Peter, and Roy Porter, eds. Toleration in Enlightenment Europe. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2000.

Bérenger, Jean. Tolérance ou paix de religion en Europe centrale. 1415-1792 . Paris: H. Champion, 2000.

Wanegffelen, Thierry. L'édit de Nantes: Une histoire européenne de la tolérance du XVIe au XXe siècle. Paris: Librairie générale française, 1998.

Wallace, Peter G. The Long European Reformation: Religion, Political Conflict, and the Search for Conformity, 1350-1750. Palgrave, 2003.
Walzer, Michael. On Toleration (1997)

Will Kymlicka, Liberalism, Community and Culture (1989), esp. third section

David Heyd, ed., Toleration: An Elusive Virtue (Princeton, 1996), esp. article by Will Kymlicka, “Two Models of Pluralism and Tolerance,” pp. 81-105.
Moore, Robert I. The Formation of a Persecuting Society: Power and Deviance in Western Europe, 950-1250. Oxford: Blackwell, 1987.

Nirenberg, David. Communities of Violence: Persecution of Minorities in the Middle Ages. Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1995.




Week 2 The Formation of Confessional Cultures
Core readings:
[If needed, for background:] Eugene Rice & Anthony Grafton, The Foundations of Early Modern Europe, 1460-1559 2nd ed., ch. 5 “Revolution and Reformation in the Church” (pp. 146-77) (*)

Kaplan, Divided by Faith, ch. 1 (`A Holy Zeal’)

Wiener, Carol. "This Beleaguered Isle: A Study of Elizabethan and Early Jacobean Anti-Catholicism." Past and Present 51 (1971): 27-62. (+)

Nischan, Bodo. "The Exorcism Controversy and Baptism in the Late Reformation," The Sixteenth Century Journal 18 (1987): 31-51. (+)


Further readings:
Wolfgang Reinhard, `Reformation, Counter-Reformation, and the Early Modern State: A Reassessment’, Catholic Historical Review 75 (1989): 383-405 (*)

--reprinted in David Luebke, ed., The Counter-Reformation: The Essential Readings (Oxford, 1999)

Lee Palmer Wandel, “Confessions,” in Thomas Max Safley, ed., A Companion to Multiconfessionalism in the Early Modern World. Leiden: Brill, 2011. Pp. 23-43.

Heinz Schilling, “Confessionalisation in Europe: Causes and effects for church, state, society, and culture,” and Friedhelm Jürgensmeier, “`Multa ad Pietatem Composita’: Continuity and change in Catholic piety, 1555-1648,” in Klaus Bussmann and Heinz Schilling, eds., 1648: War and Peace in Europe, vol. 1, pp. 219-28, 237-43

John Bossy, "The Counter-Reformation and the People of Catholic Europe," in Past and Present 47 (1970), 51-70.

Kaplan, Benjamin J. Calvinists and Libertines: Confession and Community in Utrecht, 1578-1620, chapter 1

John Bossy, Christianity in the West, 1400-1700 (1985)

Hsia, R. Po-chia. Social Discipline in the Reformation: Central Europe 1550-1750

Nischan, Bodo. Lutherans and Calvinists in the age of confessionalism. Aldershot, Hampshire, Brookfield, Vt: Ashgate/Variorum, 1999.

Lake, Peter. "Anti-Popery: The Structure of a Prejudice." In Conflict in early Stuart England: studies in religion and politics, 1603-1642, ed. Richard Cust and Ann Hughes, 72-106. London: Longman, 1989.

Benedict, Philip. "Bibliothèques protestantes et catholiques à Metz au XVIIe siàcle." Annales E.S.C. 40 (1985): 343-70.

Dompnier, Bernard. Le Venin De L'Hérésie. Image Du Protestantisme Et Combat Catholique Au XVIIe Siècle

Boer, Wietse de. The conquest of the soul : confession, discipline, and public order in Counter-Reformation Milan . Leiden: Brill, 2001.

Gregory, Brad Stephan. Salvation at Stake: Christian Martyrdom in Early Modern Europe . Harvard Historical Studies, 134. Cambridge, Mass.: Harvard University Press, 1999.

Hill, Christopher. Antichrist in Seventeenth-Century England. London: Verso, 1990.

Müller, Michael G. "Protestant confessionalisation in the towns of Royal Prussia and the practice of religious toleration in Poland-Lithuania." In Tolerance and intolerance in the European Reformation, eds. Ole Peter Grell and Bob Scribner, 262-81. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1996.

Racaut, Luc. Hatred in Print: Catholic Propaganda and Protestant Identity during the French Wars of Religion. Aldershot: Ashgate, 2002.

Walsham, Alexandra. Church Papists: Catholicism, Conformity and Confessional Polemic in Early Modern England

Wanegffelen, Thierry. Ni Rome ni Genève. Des fidèles entre deux chaires en France au XVIe siècle. Bibliothèque littéraire de la Renaissance, 3/36. Paris: H. Champion, 1997.

Week 3 Religion in Communal Life
Core readings:
Kaplan, Divided by Faith, ch. 2 (`Corpus Christianum’)

Natalie Zemon Davis, “The Sacred and the Body Social in Sixteenth-Century Lyon.” Past and Present 90 (1981): 40-70. (+)

Thomas A. Brady, Jr., “In Search of the Godly City: The Domestication of Religion in the German Urban Reformation,” in The German People and the Reformation, ed. R. Po-chia Hsia, pp. 14-31 (*)

Head, Randolph C. "Religious Coxistence and Confessional Conflict in the Vier Dörfer: Practices of Toleration in Eastern Switzerland, 1525-1615." In Beyond the Persecuting Society: Religious Toleration Before the Enlightenment, ed. John C. Laursen, and Cary J. Nederman, 145-65. (*)


Further readings:
Diefendorf, Barbara B. Beneath the Cross: Catholics and Huguenots in Sixteenth Century Paris, ch. 2

Bernd Moeller, “Imperial Cities and the Reformation,” in book by same title

David W. Sabean, Power in the Blood: Popular culture & village discourse in early modern Germany, ch. 1

Marc Forster, The Counter-Reformation in the Villages, ch. 7

Torre, Angelo. "Faith's Boundaries: Ritual and Territory in Rural Piedmont in the Early Modern Period." In The Politics of Ritual Kinship: Confraternities and Social Order in early modern Italy, ed. Nicholas Terpstra, 190-209. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1999.

Mack Walker, German Home Towns: Community, State, and General Estate 1648-1871, Part I

Jones, P. M.. "Parish, Seigneurie and the Community of Inhabitants in Southern Central France During the Eighteenth and Nineteenth Centuries." Past and Present 91 (1981): 74-108.

Beaver, Daniel C. Parish communities and religious conflict in the Vale of Gloucester, 1590-1690. Cambridge, Mass.: Harvard University Press, 1998.

Jacob, W. M. Lay People and Religion in the Early Eighteenth Century. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1996.

Blickle, Peter. Communal Reformation: The Quest for Salvation in Sixteenth-Century Germany trans. Thomas Dunlap. New Jersey: Humanities Press, 1992.

Scribner, Robert W.. "Communalism: Universal Category or Ideological Construct? A Debate in the Historiography of Early Modern Germany and Switzerland." Historical Journal 37, no. 1 (1994): 199-207.

Rublack, Hans-Christoph. "Political and Social Norms in Urban Communities in the Holy Roman Empire." In Religion, Politics and Social Protest: Three Studies on Early Modern Germany, ed. Peter Blickle, Hans-Christoph Rublack, and Winfried Schulze, 24-60. London: Allen & Unwin, 1984.

Brady, Thomas A. Jr. "Rites of Autonomy, Rites of Dependence: South German Civic Culture in the Age of Renaissance and Reformation." In Religion and Culture in the Renaissance and Reformation, ed. Steven Ozment, 9-23. Kirksville, Mo., 1989.

Reinburg, Virginia. "Liturgy and Laity in Late Medieval and Reformation France." The Sixteenth Century Journal 23 (1992).

Cressy, David. Birth, Marriage & Death: Ritual, Religion, and the Life-Cycle in Tudor and Stuart England. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1999.

Gutton, J-P. La Sociabilité villageoise dans l'ancienne France. Paris: Hachette, 1979. Ch. 6.




Week 4 Antipathy & Popular Violence
Core readings:
Kaplan, Divided by Faith, ch. 3 (`Flashpoints’)

Natalie Zemon Davis, “The Rites of Violence.” In her Society and Culture in Early Modern France, 152-87 (Stanford, 1975), originally published in Past & Present 1973 59(1): 51-91 (+)

Mark Greengrass, “The Anatomy of a Religious Riot in Toulouse in May 1562.” Journal of Ecclesiastical History 34 (1983): 367-91 (*)

Craig Koslofsky, “Honour and violence in German Lutheran funerals in the confessional age,” Social History 20, no. 3 (1995): 315-37 (+)


Further readings:
Mark Greengrass, “The Psychology of Religious Violence,” French History 5 (1991): 467-74

Thomas A. Brady, “Limits of Religious Violence in Early Modern Europe,” in Kaspar von Greyerz and Kim Siebenhüner, eds., Religion und Gewalt. Konflikte, Rituale, Deutungen (1500-1800). Göttingen: Vandenhoeck & Ruprecht, 2006. Pp. 125-151.

Pollmann, Judith. "Countering the Reformation in France and the Netherlands: Clerical Leadership and Catholic Violence, 1560-1585." Past & Present 190 (2006): 83-120.

Barbara Diefendorf, “Prologue to a Massacre: Popular Unrest in Paris, 1557-1572,” American Historical Review 90 (1985): 1067-91

Barbara Diefendorf, Beneath the Cross: Catholics and Huguenots in Sixteenth-Century Paris

Crouzet, Denis. Les guerriers de Dieu: La violence au temps des troubles de religion (vers 1525-vers 1610). 2 vols.

Woltjer, J. J.. "Violence during the Wars of Religion in France and the Netherlands: A Comparison." Nederlands archief voor kerkgeschiedenis/Dutch Archive for Church History 76 (1996): 26-45.

Benedict, Philip. "The Saint Bartholomew's Massacres in the Provinces." The Historical Journal 21 (1978): 205-25.

Roberts, Penny. "Contesting sacred space: burial disputes in sixteenth-century France." In The Place of the Dead: Death and Remembrance in Late Medieval and Early Modern Europe, ed. Bruce Gordon and Peter Marshall, 131-48. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2000.

Christin, Olivier. Une révolution symbolique. L'iconoclasme huguenot et la reconstruction catholique. Paris, 1991.

Coulet, Noël. "Processions, espace urbain, communauté civique." In Liturgie et musique (XIe-XIVe s.), ed. Edouard Privot, Toulouse, 1982.

Diefendorf, Barbara. "Prologue to a Massacre: Popular Unrest in Paris, 1557-1572." American Historical Review 90 (1985): 1067-91.

Lee Palmer Wandel, Voracious Idols and Violent Hands: Iconoclasm in Reformation Zurich, Strasbourg and Basel

Rogers, Nicholas. "Riot and Popular Jacobitism in Early Hanoverian England." In Ideology and Conspiracy: Aspects of Jacobitism, 1689-1759, ed. E. Cruickshanks, 70-88. Edinburgh, 1982.

Sproxton, Judy. Violence and religion attitudes towards militancy in the French civil wars and the English Revolution. 103 p vols. London, New York: Routledge, 1995.

Robin Clifton, “The Popular Fear of Catholics during the English Revolution,” Past and Present 52 (1971): 23-55

Jones, G. H.. "The Irish Fright of 1688: Real Violence and Imagined Massacre." Bulletin of the Institute of Historical Researchulletin 55, no. 132 (1982): 148-53.

Frijhoff, The Panic of 1734, in his book Embodied Belief: Ten Essays on Religious Culture in Dutch History (Hilversum, 2002)

Holmes, Geoffrey. "The Sacheverell riots: the crowd and the Church in early eighteenth-century London." Past and Present 72 (1976): 55-85.

Furley, O. W.. "The Pope-Burning Processions of the Late Seventeenth Century." History 44 (1959): 16-23.

Cressy, David. Bonfires and Bells: National Memory and the Protestant Calendar in Elizabethan and Stuart England. Berkeley: University of California Press, 1989.

Norman Cohn, The Pursuit of the Millennium: Revolutionary Millenarians and Mystical Anarchists of the Middle Ages (London, 1970)

Christopher Hill, Antichrist in seventeenth-century England (London, 1971)

J. Foa. "An unequal apportionment: the conflict over space between Protestants and Catholics at the beginning of the war of religion." French History (2006): 369-86.




Week 5 Religious States and Religious Wars
Core readings:
Konrad Repgen. "What is a `Religious War'?" In Politics and Society in Reformation Europe, edited by E.I. Kouri and Tom Scott, 311-28. New York, 1987. (*)

Philip Benedict, “Religion and Politics in Europe, 1500-1700,” in Kaspar von Greyerz and Kim Siebenhüner, eds., Religion und Gewalt. Konflikte, Rituale, Deutungen (1500-1800). Göttingen: Vandenhoeck & Ruprecht, 2006. Pp. 155-173. (*)


Further readings: for this week, in addition to the core readings, you are required to gain a knowledge of one of the following wars (or sets of wars): the French Wars of Religion, the Thirty Years’ War, or the Dutch Revolt against Spain. For initial orientation, I recommend that you read the relevant essay in a reference work such as R. Po-chia Hsia, ed., A Companion to the Reformation World (Blackwell, 2004) (essays by Barbara Diefendorf, Johannes Burkhardt, and Joke Spaans). Then read selectively from one of the following lists:
The French Wars of Religion:

Holt, Mack. The French Wars of Religion, 1562-1629 (1995)

Knecht, R. J. The French Religious Wars, 1562-1598 (2002)

Salmon, J. H. M. Society in Crisis: France in the Sixteenth Century. London: Methuen, 1975.

Briggs, Robin. Early Modern France, 1560-1715

Diefendorf, Barbara. Beneath the Cross: Catholics and Huguenots in Sixteenth-Century Paris (Oxford, 1991)

Benedict, Philip. Rouen during the Wars of Religion (Cambridge, 1981)

Roberts, Penny. A City in Conflict: Troyes during the French Wars of Religion. Manchester: Manchester University Press, 1996.

Konnert, Mark W. Civic Agendas and Religious Passion: Châlons-sur-Marne during the French Wars of Religion. Kirksville: Sixteenth Century Journal Publishers, 1997.

Wolfe, Michael. The Conversion of Henri IV: Politics, Power, and Religious Belief in Early Modern France. Cambridge, Mass., 1993.



The Thirty Years‘ War:

S.H. Steinberg, The Thirty Years' War and the Conflict for European Hegemony, 1600-1660 (1966)

Geoffrey Parker, The Thirty Years’ War (London, 1984)

R. G. Asch, The Thirty Years War: The Holy Roman Empire and Europe, 1618-1648 (1997)

Bussmann, Klaus, and Heinz Schilling, ed. 1648: War and Peace in Europe, 3 vols. Munich: Bruckmann, 1998. Vol. 1.

Thomas A. Brady Jr., German Histories in the Age of Reformations, 1400-1650 (Cambridge, 2009), Part IV

Peter Wilson, Europe’s Tragedy: A History of the Thirty Years War (London, 2009)

Robert Bireley, The Jesuits and the Thirty Years War: Kings, Courts, and Confessors (Cambridge, 2003)

Richard Bonney, The Thirty Years’ War 1618-1648 (Oxford, 2002)

Graham Darby, The Thirty Years’ War (London, 2001)



The Dutch Revolt:

Parker, Geoffrey. The Dutch Revolt (1977)

Geyl, Pieter. The Revolt of the Netherlands, 1555-1609 (2nd ed. London, 1958)

Israel, Jonathan. The Dutch Republic: Its Rise, Greatness, and Fall, esp. chs. 7-12

Darby, Graham, ed., The Origins and Development of the Dutch Revolt (2001)

Duke, Alastair. Reformation and Revolt in the Low Countries (London, 1990)

Crew, Phyllis Mack. Calvinist Preaching and Iconoclasm in the Netherlands 1544-1569 (Cambridge, 1978)

Limm, Peter. The Dutch Revolt, 1559-1648 (London, 1989)

Nierop, Henk van. `Similar problems, different outcomes: the Revolt of the Netherlands and the Wars of Religion in France’, in A Miracle Mirrored: The Dutch Republic in European Perspective, ed. K. Davids and J. Lucassen (Cambridge, 1995), 26-56

Darby, Graham, ed. The Origins and Development of the Dutch Revolt (2001)

Hibben, C.C. Gouda in Revolt: Particularism and Pacifism in the Revolt of the Netherlands, 1572-1588 (Utrecht, 1983)


Week 6 France
Core readings:
Luria, Keith. “France: An Overview,” in Thomas M. Safley, ed., A Companion to Multiconfessionalism in the Early Modern World (Leiden, 2011), p. 209-238 (+)

The Edict of Nantes (1598): Preamble, Articles 1-29, Secret Articles, Royal Warrant, Secret Articles [Brevet] (*)

Mentzer, Raymond A. "Bipartisan Justice and the Pacification of Late Sixteenth-Century Languedoc." In Regnum, Religio et Ratio: Essays Presented to Robert M. Kingdon, ed. Jerome Friedman, 125-32. Kirksville, Mo.: Sixteenth Century Journal Publishers, 1987. (*)

Luria, Keith. "Separated by Death? Burials, Cemeteries, and Confessional Boundaries in Seventeenth-Century France." French Historical Studies 24 (2001): 185-222. (+)


Further readings:
Keith Luria, Sacred Boundaries: Religious Coexistence and Conflict in Early-Modern France. Washington, D.C., 2005.

Philip Benedict, “Un roi, une loi, deux fois: parameters for the history of Catholic-Reformed co-existence in France, 1555-1685,” in Grell & Scribner, Tolerance and Intolerance in the European Reformation, pp. 65-93

Cottret, Bernard. L'Edit de Nantes 1598 : pour en finir avec les guerres de religion. 491 p vols. Paris: Perrin, 1997.

Christin, Olivier. La Paix De Religion: L'Autonomisation De La Raison Politique Au XVIe Siècle.

Hanlon, Gregory. Confession and Community in Seventeenth-Century France: Catholic and Protestant Coexistence in Aquitaine.

Philip Benedict, The Huguenot Population of France, 1600-1685: The Demographic Fate and Customs of a Religious Minority

Rabut, Elisabeth. Le roi, l'église et le temple. L'Éxecution de l'Édit de Nantes en Dauphiné. Grenoble: Editions la pensée sauvage , 1987.

Goodbar, Richard L., ed. The Edict of Nantes: Five Essays and A New Translation. Bloomington, Minn.: The National Huguenot Society , 1998.

Benedict, Philip. "Confessionalization in France? Critical reflections and new evidence." In Society and Culture in the Huguenot World, 1559-1685, ed. Raymond A. Mentzer and Andrew Spicer, 44-61. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2002.

Roberts, Penny. "Contesting sacred space: burial disputes in sixteenth-century France." In The Place of the Dead: Death and Remembrance in Late Medieval and Early Modern Europe, ed. Bruce Gordon and Peter Marshall, 131-48. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2000.

Pérouas, Louis. Le diocèse de La Rochelle de 1648 à 1724. Sociologie et pastorale. Paris: S.E.V.P.E.N., 1964.

Sauzet, Robert. Contre-réforme et réforme catholique en Bas-Languedoc: Le diocèse de Nîmes au XVIIe siècle. Paris: Publications de la Sorbonne, 1979.

Luria, Keith. Territories of Grace: Cultural change in the seventeenth-century Diocese of Grenoble.

Benoist, André. "Catholiques et Protestants en `Moyen-Poitou' jusqu'à la Révocation de l'Édit de Nantes (1534-1685)." Bulletin de la Société historique et scientifique des Deux-Sevres 2/16 (1983): 235-439.

Debon, René. "Religion et vie quotidienne à Gap (1657-1685)." In Le Protestantisme en Dauphiné au XVIIe siècle, ed. Pierre Bolle, 90-169. Curandera, 1983.

Desplat, Christian. "Sépulture et frontière confessionelle: Protestants et catholiques de Béarn (XVI-XVIIe siècle)." Revue de Pau et du Béarn 23 (1996): 67-75.

Labrousse, Elisabeth. "Une foi, une loi, un roi?" Essai sur la Revocation de l'Édit de Nantes. Geneva: Labor et Fides, 1985.

Quéniart, Jean. La Révocation de l'Edit de Nantes. Protestants et catholiques en France de 1598 à 1685. Paris: Desclée de Brouwer, 1985.

Garrisson, Janine. L'Edit de Nantes: chronique d'une paix attendue. Paris: Fayard, 1998.

Grandjean, Michel, and Bernard Roussel, eds. Coexister dans l'intolérance: L'édit de Nantes (1598). Histoire et Société, 37. Geneva: Labor et Fides, 1998.

Negroni, B. de. Intolérances. Catholiques et protestants en France, 1560-1787. Paris: Hachette, 1996.
Michelet, J. De la révocation de l'édit de Nantes à la guerre des Cévennes. Montpellier, 1985.

Joutard, Philippe. “The Revocation of the Edict of Nantes: End or Renewal of French Calvinism?” In International Calvinism 1541-1715, ed. Menna Prestwich, 339-68.

Prestwich, Menna. "The Revocation of the Edict of Nantes." History 73 (1988): 63-73.

Week 7 The Holy Roman Empire
Core readings:
Luebke, David M. “A Multiconfessional Empire.” In Thomas M. Safley, ed., A Companion to Multiconfessionalism in the Early Modern World (Leiden, 2011), pp. 129-154. (+)

The Peace of Osnabrück (IPO 1648)(part of the Peace of Westphalia), article V (*)

--a variety of editions and translations are available for comparison at: http://www.pax-westphalica.de/ipmipo/index.html (click on `Übersetzungen’ in left column)

Whaley, Joachim. “Pouvoir sauver les apparences: The theory and practice of tolerance in 18th-century Germany.” British Journal for Eighteenth-Century Studies 13 (1990): 1-18 (*)

François, Étienne. “De l'uniformité à la tolérance: confession et société urbaine en Allemagne, 1650-1800.” Annales E.S.C. 37 (1982): 783-800 (+)
Further readings:
Anton Schindling, “Neighbours of a Different Faith: Confessional coexistence and parity in the territorial states and towns of the Empire,” in Bussmann and Schilling, eds., 1648: War and Peace in Europe, vol. 1, pp. 465-73 (*)Kaplan, Divided by Faith, ch. 6

Kaplan, `Diplomacy and Domestic Devotion: Embassy Chapels and the Toleration of Religious Dissent in Early Modern Europe’, Journal of Early Modern History 6/4 (2002): 341-61.

Étienne François, Die unsichtbare Grenze: Protestanten und Katholiken in Augsburg 1648-1806

--also available in French as Protestants et catholiques en Allemagne. Identités et pluralisme. Augsbourg, 1648-1806

Grossmann, Walter. “Religious toleration in Germany, 1684 [1648] -1750.” Studies on Voltaire and the eighteenth century 201 (1982): 115-41 – can read just first part, pp. 115-27 (*)

Joachim Whaley, Religious Toleration and Social Change in Hamburg, 1529-1819

Zschunke, Peter. Konfession und Alltag in Oppenheim

Warmbrunn, Paul. Zwei Konfessionen in einer Stadt

Miskimin, Patricia Behre. One king, one law, three faiths: religion and the rise of absolutism in seventeenth-century Metz. Westport, Conn., 2002.

Warmbrunn, Paul. "Simultaneen in der Pfalz." Jahrbuch für westdeutsche Landesgeschichte 14 (1988): 97-122.

Grossmann, Walter. "Toleration -- Exercitium Religionis Privatum." Journal of the History of Ideas 40 (1979): 29-34.

Fuchs, François Joseph. “Les catholiques strasbourgeois de 1529 à 1681.” Archives de l'église d'Alsace n.s. 22 (1975): 141-69

Scherzer, Walter. “Die Augsburger Konfessionsverwandten des Hochstifts Würzburg nach dem Westfälischen Frieden.” Zeitschrift für Bayerische Kirchengeschichte 49 (1980): 20-43.

Hegel, Eduard. “Zum Verhältnis der Konfessionen in Deutschland am Ende des 18. Jahrhunderts.” In Zwischen Polemik und Irenik. Untersuchungen zum Verhältnis der Konfessionen im späten 18. und frühen 19. Jahrhundert, edited by Georg Schwaiger, 11-28. Part I (pp. 11-17).

Peter G. Wallace, Communities and Conflict in Early Modern Colmar: 1575-1730

Forster, Marc. The Counter-Reformation in the Villages: Religion and Reform in the Bishopric of Speyer, 1560-1720

Soliday, Gerald Lyman. A Community in Conflict: Frankfurt Society in the Seventeenth and Early Eighteenth Centuries

Walker, Mack. The Salzburg Transaction: Expulsion and Redemption in Eighteenth-Century Germany

Abray, Lorna Jane. "Confession, conscience and honour: the limits of magisterial tolerance in sixteenth-century Strassburg." In Tolerance and intolerance in the European Reformation, ed. Ole Peter Grell and Bob Scribner, 94-107. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1996.

Dietz, Burkhard, and Stefan Ehrenpreis, eds. Drei Konfessionen in einer Region. Beiträge zur Geschichte der Konfessionalisierung im Herzogtum Berg vom 16. bis zum 18. Jahrhundert. Cologne: Rheinland-Verlag, 1999.

Driedger, Michael D. Obedient Heretics: Mennonite identities in Lutheran Hamburg and Altona during the confessional age. Aldershot: Ashgate, 2002.

Forster, Marc R. Catholic Revival in the Age of the Baroque: Religious Identity in Southwest Germany, 1550-1750. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2001.

Hsia, R. Po-chia. Social Discipline in the Reformation: Central Europe 1550-1750. London: Routledge, 1989.

———. Society and Religion in Münster, 1535-1618. New Haven: Yale University Press, 1984.

Knudsen, Jonathan. Justus Möser and the German Enlightenment. Cambridge, 1986.

Dickmann, Fritz. "Das Problem der Gleichberechtigung der Konfessionen im Reich im 16. und 17. Jahrhundert." Historische Zeitschrift 201 (1965): 265-305.

Heckel, Martin. "Die Parität im Heiligen Römischen Reiche deutscher Nation." Zeitschrift der Savigny-Stiftung für Rechtsgeschichte, Kanonistische Abteilung 49 (1963): 261-420.

Ehrenpreis, Stefan. "Wir sind mit blutigen Köpfen davongelaufen...". Lokale Konfessionskonflikte im Herzogtum Berg 1550-1700. Bochum: Dieter Winkler, 1993.

Pigge, Heinrich. Die religiose Toleranz Friedrichs des Grossen nach ihrer theoretischen und praktischen Seite. Mainz: Franz Kirchheim, 1899.

Ruthmann, B. "Die Religionsprozesse als Folge der Glaubensspaltung." In Frieden durch Recht. Das Reichskammergericht von 1495 bis 1806, ed. I. Scheurmann, 231-40. Mayence, 1994.

Châtellier, Louis. Tradition chrétienne et renouveau catholique dans le cadre de l'ancien diocèse de Strasbourg (1650-1770). Paris: Association des Publications près les Universités des Strasbourg, 1981.

Week 8 The Netherlands
Core readings:
Spohnholz, Jesse. “Confessional Coexistence in the Early Modern Low Countries,” in Thomas M. Safley, ed., A Companion to Multiconfessionalism in the Early Modern World (Leiden, 2011), pp. 47-73. (+)

The Union of Utrecht (1579): article 13, plus a summary of the Religious Peace of Archduke Matthias (1578) (*)

Pettegree, Andrew. “The politics of toleration in the Free Netherlands, 1572-1620,” in Grell & Scribner, eds., Tolerance and intolerance in the European Reformation, pp. 182-98 (*)

Kaplan, Benjamin J.. "Fictions of Privacy: House Chapels and the Spatial Accommodation of Religious Dissent in Early Modern Europe." American Historical Review 107 (2002): 1031-64. (+)

Jonathan I. Israel, The Dutch Republic: Its Rise, Greatness, and Fall 1477-1806, ch. 16, esp. pp. 372-77.
Further readings:
Willem Frijhoff & Marijke Spes, 1650: Hard-Won Unity, ch. 6

Frijhoff, Willem. "Religious toleration in the United Provinces: from `case' to `model'." In Calvinism and Religious Toleration in the Dutch Golden Age, ed. R. Po-chia Hsia and H. F. K. Van Nierop, 27-52. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2002.

Schilling, Heinz. "Religion and Society in the Northern Netherlands." In Religion, Political Culture and the Emergence of Early Modern Society: Essays in German and Dutch History, Schilling, 353-412. Leiden: Brill, 1992.

Willem Frijhoff, Embodied Belief: Ten Essays on Religious Culture in Dutch History

Jonathan I. Israel, The Dutch Republic: Its Rise, Greatness, and Fall 1477-1806, chs. 16, 27, & 38 (pp. 361-98, 637-76, 1019-37)

John Marshall, John Locke, Toleration and Early Enlightenment Culture (Cambridge, 2006), ch. 4.

Kaplan, Benjamin J. Calvinists and Libertines: Confession and Community in Utrecht, 1578-1620

Judith Pollmann, Religious Choice in the Dutch Republic: The Reformation of Arnoldus Buchelius (1565-1641)

Hsia, Ronnie and Henk van Nierop, eds., Calvinism and Religious Toleration in the Dutch Golden Age [ULL]

Berkvens-Stevelinck, Christiane, Jonathan Irvine Israel, and G. H. M Posthumus Meyjes, eds. The Emergence of Tolerance in the Dutch Republic, especially Willem Frijhoff, “Dimensions de la coexistence confessionnelle”

Alastair Hamilton et al., eds. From Martyr to Muppy. A Historical Introduction to Cultural Assimilation Processes of a Religious Minority in the Netherlands: the Mennonites.

Th. van Deursen, Plain Lives in a Golden Age: Popular culture, religion and society in seventeenth-century Holland, part IV, “Heaven and Hell”

Andrew C. Fix, Prophecy and Reason: The Dutch Collegiants in the Early Enlightenment

Parker, Charles H. The Reformation of Community: Social Welfare and Calvinist Charity in Holland

Groenhuis, G. "Calvinism and National Consciousness: the Dutch Republic as the New Israel," in Britain and the Netherlands, vol. 7, ed. A.C. Duke and C.A. Tamse

Spiertz, Mathieu G. “Priest and Layman in a Minority Church: The Roman Catholic Church in the Northern netherlands, 1592-1686,” in W.J. Sheils and Diana Wood, eds., The Ministry: Clerical and Lay

Kooi, Christine. Liberty and religion: church and state in Leiden's Reformation, 1572-1620

Duke, Alastair. Reformation and Revolt in the Low Countries, chs. 9-11, especially 11

Temple, Sir William. Observations upon the United Provinces of the Netherlands ed. G. N. Clark. Oxford: 1972. Chapter 5.


Week 9 Families, Friends, Neighbours, and Divided Selves
Core readings:
Kymlicka, Will. "Two Models of Pluralism and Tolerance." In Toleration: An Elusive Virtue, ed. David Heyd, 81-105. Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1996. (Focus on first part of article, on the two models.) (*)

Kaplan, Benjamin J. "`For They Will Turn Away Thy Sons': the Practice and Perils of Mixed Marriage in the Dutch Golden Age." In Family and Piety in Early Modern Europe, Benjamin J. Kaplan, and Marc R. Forster, 115-33. Aldershot: Ashgate, 2005. (*)

Pollmann, Judith. "The bond of Christian piety: the individual practice of tolerance and intolerance in the Dutch Republic." In Calvinism and Religious Toleration in the Dutch Golden Age, ed. R. Po-chia Hsia and H. F. K. Van Nierop, 53-71. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2002. (*)

Griffiths, Nicholas. "The Best of Both Faiths: The Boundaries of Religious Allegiance and Opportunism in Early Eighteenth-Century Cuenca." Bulletin of Hispanic Studies 77 (2000): 13-39. (+)

Further readings:
Étienne François, Die unsichtbare Grenze: Protestanten und Katholiken in Augsburg 1648-1806

--also available in French as Protestants et catholiques en Allemagne. Identités et pluralisme. Augsbourg, 1648-1806

Stevenson, Bill. "The social integration of post-Restoration dissenters, 1660-1725." In The World of the Rural Dissenters, 1520-1795, ed. Margaret Spufford, 360-87. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1995.

Anne Goldgar, Impolite Learning: Conduct and Community in the Republic of Letters, 1680-1750, ch. 4 “Of Two Minds” (pp. 174-218)

Grieser, D. Jonathan. "The Household Divided against Itself: Anabaptists and their Families in Tyrol, 1536-60." In Family and Piety in Early Modern Europe, Benjamin J. Kaplan, and Marc R. Forster, 134-51. Aldershot: Ashgate, 2005.

Willem Frijhoff, Embodied Belief: Ten Essays on Religious Culture in Dutch History, chapter 2

Hanlon, Confession and Community in Seventeenth-Century France, esp. chs. 4 & 7

Zschunke, Peter. Konfession und Alltag in Oppenheim

Safley, Thomas Max. Charity and Economy in the Orphanages of Early Modern Augsburg. Atlantic Highlands: Humanities Press, 1997.

Martin, Odile. La Conversion protestante à Lyon (1659-1687). Geneva: Droz, 1986.

Mentzer, Raymond A. Jr. Blood and Belief: Family Survival and Confessional Identity among the Provincial Huguenot Nobility. West Lafayette, Indiana: Purdue University Press, 1994.

Labrousse, E.. "La conversion d'un huguenot au catholicisme en 1665." Revue d'Histoire de l'Eglise de France 64, no. 172 (1978).

Labrousse, Elisabeth. "Conversions à Mauvezin au XVIIe siècle." In La Conversion au XVIIe siècle, Marseilles, 1983.

Freist, Dagmar. "One body, two confessions: mixed marriages in Germany." In Gender in Early Modern German History, ed. Ulinka Rublack, 275-304. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2002.

Freist, Dagmar. "Religious Difference and the Experience of Widowhood in Early Modern Germany." In Widows in Medieval and Early Modern Europe, eds. Sandra Cavallo and Lyndan Warner, 164-78. London: Longman, 1999.

Benjamin J. Kaplan. "Intimate negotiations: husbands and wives of opposing faiths in eighteenth-century Holland." In Living with diversity in early modern Europe, edited by C. Scott Dixon, Dagmar Freist and Mark Greengrass, 225-48. Farnham: Ashgate, 2009.

Kenneth Mills and Anthony Grafton, eds., Conversion: Old Worlds and New (Rochester, N.Y., 2003)

Kim Siebenhüner, "Glaubenswechsel in der frühen Neuzeit. Chancen und Tendenzen einer historischen Konversionsforschung," Zeitschrift für historische Forschung 34 (2007): 243-72




Week 10 Jews in Christian Europe
Core readings:
Bonfil, Robert. "Aliens Within: The Jews and Antijudaism." In Handbook of European History, 1400-1600, eds. Thomas A. Brady Jr., Heiko A. Oberman, and James D. Tracy, 263-302. Vol. 1. Leiden: Brill, 1994. (*)

Mark R. Cohen and Theodore K. Rabb, “The Significance of Leon Modena’s Autobiography for Early Modern Jewish and General European History,” in Cohen, Mark R., ed. The Autobiography of a Seventeenth-Century Venetian Rabbi: Leon Modena's Life of Judah. Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1988. pp 3-18. (*)

Friedman, Jerome. "Jewish Conversion and the Spanish Pure Blood Laws: A Revisionist View of Racial Antisemitism." Sixteenth Century Journal 18 (1987): 4-29. (+)

Schama, Simon. "A Different Jerusalem: The Jews in Rembrandt's Amsterdam." In The Jews in the Age of Rembrandt, 3-17. 1981. (*)


Further readings:
Nirenberg, David. Communities of Violence: Persecution of Minorities in the Middle Ages. Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1995.

Israel, Jonathan I. European Jewry in the Age of Mercantilism 1550-1750. Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1989.

Bonfil, Robert. Jewish Life in Renaissance Italy. Berkeley: University of California Press, 1994.

Ruderman, David B., ed. Essential papers on Jewish culture in Renaissance and baroque Italy. Essential papers on Jewish studies. New York: New York University Press, 1992. Especially articles by Ravid (the term ghetto)Ruderman (science), Cohen (apologetics), Stow (Roman ghetto), Bonfil (Kabbalah)

Bodian, Miriam. "`Men of the Nation`: The Shaping of Converso Identity in Early Modern Europe." Past and Present 143 (1994): 48-76. (+)

Bodian, Miriam. Hebrews of the Portuguese Nation: Conversos and Community in Early Modern Amsterdam. Bloomington: Indiana University Press, 1997.

Lewis, Bernard. Cultures in Conflict: Christians, Muslims, and Jews in the Age of Discovery. New York: Oxford University Press, 1995.

Melammed, Renee Levine. Heretics or Daughters of Israel? The Crypto-Jewish Women of Castile. New York: Oxford University Press, 1999.

Barnett, R. D., and W. M. Schwab, eds. The Western Sephardim. The Sephardi Heritage: Essays on the History and Cultural Contribution of the Jews of Spain and Portugal, 2. Grendon, Northants: Gibraltar Books, 1989.

Polonsky, Anthony, Jakub Basista, and Andrzej Link-Lenczkowski, ed. The Jews in Old Poland: Jewish community in the Poland-Lithuania commonwealth, 100-1795. London: I. B. Tauris, 1993.



The Life of Glückel of Hameln, 1646-1724 trans. Beth-Zion Abrahams. London: East and West Library, 1962.

Stow, Kenneth. Theater of Acculturation: The Roman Ghetto in the 16th Century. Seattle: University of Washington Press, 2001.

Stow, Kenneth R. Catholic thought and papal Jewry policy, 1555-1593 . New York: Jewish Theological Seminary of America, 1977.

Davis, Robert C., and Benjamin C. I. Ravid, eds. The Jews of early modern Venice. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 2001. See especially Donatella Calabi, `The “City of the Jews”’ pp. 31-49

Garcia-Arenal, Mercedes, and G. Wiegers. A Man of Three Worlds. Samuel Pallache, a Moroccan Jew in Catholic and Protestant Europe. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 2003.

Kaplan, Yosef. From Christianity to Judaism: the Story of Isaac Orobio de Castro trans. Raphael Loewe. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1989 .

Pullan, Brian. The Jews of Europe and the Inquisition of Venice, 1550-1670. London: I.B. Tauris, 1997.

Cohen, Mark R., ed. The Autobiography of a Seventeenth-Century Venetian Rabbi: Leon Modena's Life of Judah. Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1988.

Katz, Jacob. Out of the Ghetto: The Social Background of Jewish Emancipation, 1770-1870. Cambridge, Mass.: Harvard University Press, 1973.

Hsia, R. Po-chia, and Hartmut Lehmann. In and Out of the Ghetto: Jewish-Gentile Relations in Late Medieval and Early Modern Germany. Washington, D.C.: German Historical Institute, 1995. Especially chapters by Yacov Guggenheim (the poor) and Robert Jütte (physicians)

Poliakov, Leon. The History of Anti-Semitism. Esp. chs. 8-10 (France, England, Germany)

Edwards, John. "Race and Religion in Fifteenth- and Sixteenth-Century Spain: The `Purity of Blood' Laws Revisited." Proceedings of the Tenth World Congress of Jewish Studies B/2 (1990): 159-66. To be read in conjunction with Friedman.

Oberman, Heiko. The Roots of Antisemitism. Philadelphia, 1981.

Hsia, R. Po-Chia. Trent 1475: Stories of a Ritual Murder. New Haven: Yale University Press, 1992.

Ravid, Benjamin. Studies on the Jews of Venice, 1382-1797. Aldershot: Ashgate, 2003. See especially "Curfew Time in the Ghetto of Venice"

Endelman, Todd M. The Jews of Georgian England, 1714-1830: Tradition and Change in a Liberal Society. Philadelphia, 1979.



Monter, E. William. Frontiers of Heresy: The Spanish Inquisition from the Basque Lands to Sicily. New York: Cambridge University Press, 1990.


The database is protected by copyright ©essaydocs.org 2016
send message

    Main page