History 261 Crime and Punishment in Europe and America since 1500



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HISTORY 261
Crime and Punishment in Europe and America since 1500
FALL 2004

3210


MW—2:00-3:15 pm
Instructor: M. B. Emmerichs
Office: (Next to the Dean’s Administrative Assistant)
Phone: 459-4422
Home: 414-355-2779
e-mail:
memmeric@uwc.edu
or
mb_emmerichs@hotmail.com
Office Hours: MW—10:00-10:50 am and 3:20-4:00 pm

This 3-credit sophomore level course is a transnational survey of the history of crime and punishment in Europe and North America from 1500 to the present.  The emphasis will be on the social context of the legislative creation of new crimes, the origin of prisons and police forces, changes in the types of crimes committed as urbanization and industrialization advance, the evolution of the criminal justice systems in Europe and America, and the comparison and interpretation of differential crime rates in Europe and America. 

 The books for the course, available at UW Sheboygan Bookstore, are as follows:  Cesare Beccaria, On Crime and Punishment; Johnson and Wolfe, History of Criminal Justice; Godfrey et al., Comparative Histories of Crime; Miller, Cops and Bobbies. Two articles by Emmerichs are on reserve in the library.  You may photocopy these articles for your own use

 

The grade for the course will be decided as follows:



Term Paper                          25%
Mid-term exam                    25%  Oct 27
Final Exam                           25%  Dec 20, 1:00-3:00 pm        
Class Participation and quizzes  25%

 

The Term Paper will be a 10 page paper on a topic of your choice, due November 17.  The topic must be approved by me.  We will discuss the requirements for the term paper in class on October 4.  It is your responsibility to be there and get this information.



 

EACH WEEK you are required to bring to class a short (no more than two pages), well-written, typed response to two chapters you have completed in the readings.  Each chapter may be from a different book.  These responses will be due each Wednesday.

 

If because of a disability you have special needs for taking notes or tests, please let me know as soon as possible.

 

 

SCHEDULE OF LECTURES AND READINGS



 

Sep 8-22                      QUIZZES, Sep 13, Sep 20

Lecture and Discussion topics:  Introduction, What is Crime?; Crime and punishment in the ancient world;
witch-hunting, torture, and legal procedure in the Early Modern Period (1500-1750), Crime and Sin

Reading: Johnson and Wolfe, Prefaces, Introduction,
Chapters 2,3,4.

 

Sep 27-Oct 20             DISCUSSION OF REQUIREMENTS FOR TERM PAPER, Oct 4.



NO CLASS OCTOBER 20
Paper Topic, Preliminary Outline and Sources due Oct 18.

Lecture and Discussion topics:  History of Prisons and Punishment,


Transportation of  Convicts, Capital Punishment, Reform of  British Criminal Law, Creation of Police forces, Moral Panics,

Reading: Beccaria (entire text); Johnson and Wolfe, Chapters 5,6;
Godfrey, 1,2,3,4
                                               

           

Oct 25-Nov 10            MIDTERM, Oct 27
Lecture and Discussion Topics:  Crime in Industrializing and Urbanizing Societies, Infanticide,

Women and Homicide, Police and Policing, Public Order



Reading: Johnson and Wolfe, Chapters 7,8,9,10; Emmerichs,
“Trials of Women for Homicide,” and “Getting Away with Murder? Homicide and the Coroners in Nineteenth-Century
 London,” (on reserve);  Miller,
Cops and Bobbies

 

Nov 15-Dec 1              TERM PAPER DUE—NOVEMBER 17


Lecture and Discussion Topics: Crime and Punishment in America and

Comparisons with the European Experience



Reading: Johnson and Wolfe, Chapters 11,12,13, Godfrey, 5,6,7,8    

                       

Dec 6-Dec 15              QUIZZES, Dec 6, Dec 13

Questions for Final Examination to be handed out, Dec 6.
Lecture and Discussion Topics:  Crime and Punishment in the twentieth century; Crime Statistics

Reading: Godfrey, 9,10,11; Johnson and Wolfe,14,15

 

FINAL EXAMINATION DECEMBER 20, 1:00-3:00pm

                                                                                               

                       



ARTICLES ON RESERVE IN LIBRARY

 

Emmerichs, Mary Beth, “Trials of Women for Homicide in Nineteenth-Century England,” Women and Criminal Justice, Vol. 5, No. 1, 1993, pp.99-109.



------------“Getting Away with Murder? Homicide and the Coroners in 19th-Century London,” Social Science History, Volume 25, No. 1, Spring 2001, pp. 93-100

 


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