Hist 101-0xx-11111 section: Days Classroom Class Time prerequisites



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Ivy Tech Community College – Course Syllabus

HIST 101: SURVEY of AMERICAN HISTORY I


COURSE TITLE: Survey of American History I

COURSE NUMBER: HIST 101-0XX-11111

SECTION: Days Classroom Class Time

PREREQUISITES: Demonstrated competency through appropriate assessment or earning a grade of “C” or better in ENG 025 Introduction to College writing II and ENG 032 Reading Strategies for College II

DIVISION: School of Liberal Arts & Sciences

CREDIT HOURS: 3

CONTACT HOURS: Lecture: 3
INSTRUCTOR: Teacher Name

TELEPHONE: 000-000-0000

E-MAIL: name@ivytech.edu

OFFICE: Room
REQUIRED TEXT:

From list of five approved textbooks




CATALOG DESCRIPTION:

Covers major themes and events in American history from domestic and global standpoints, including exploration of the New World; the colonial period; causes and results of the American Revolution; the development of the federal system of government; the growth of democracy; early popular American culture; territorial expansion; slavery and its effect; reform movements, sectionalism; causes and effects of the Civil War.



MAJOR COURSE LEARNING OBJECTIVES:

Upon successful completion of this course the student will be expected to:
1. Identify the principal features of the periods of United States History and determine their significance.

2. Analyze the effect of the geography and ecology of the continent on the roots of American Civilization.

3. Examine the on-going encounters among European, African, Asian and American Indian cultures.

4. Describe the role of religion in American life in relation to spiritual awakenings, denominational diversity, reform movements, and family life from earliest time through the Civil War.

5. Describe the forging of American nationalism from the Revolutionary Era through Reconstruction.

6. Trace the rise of democratic politics and the emergence of a mass party system from the Federalist Period through the Jacksonian Era.

7. Examine the transformation of American society from rural agriculture to urban industrial culture.

8. Analyze the emerging crises of slavery and sectionalism culminating in the Civil War and Reconstruction.

9. Reflect on American historical issues and themes and form coherent, defensible interpretations about their domestic and global impact.
COURSE CONTENT: Topical areas of study include:

1.) First Americans 2.) European Exploration and Colonization

3.) The American Colonies 4.) The Revolutionary War Era

5.) The Developing New Nation 6.) The Jacksonian Era

7.) The Reform Movements 8.) Westward Expansion

9.) Slavery and the Impending Crisis 10.) The Civil War 11.) Reconstruction




HOW TO ACCESS THE IVY TECH COMMUNITY COLLEGE LIBRARY:

The Ivy Tech Library is available to students’ on- and off-campus, offering full text journals and books and other resources essential for course assignments. Go to http://www.ivytech.edu/library/ and choose the link for your campus.


ACADEMIC HONESTY STATEMENT:

The College is committed to academic integrity in all its practices. The faculty value intellectual integrity and a high standard of academic conduct. Activities that violate academic integrity undermine the quality and diminish the value of educational achievement.

Cheating on papers, tests or other academic works is a violation of College rules. No student shall engage in behavior that, in the judgment of the instructor of the class, may be construed as cheating. This may include, but is not limited to, plagiarism or other forms of academic dishonesty such as the acquisition without permission of tests or other academic materials and/or distribution of these materials and other academic work. This includes students who aid and abet as well as those who attempt such behavior.
COPYRIGHT STATEMENT:

Students shall adhere to the laws governing the use of copyrighted materials. They must insure that their activities comply with fair use and in no way infringe on the copyright or other proprietary rights of others and that the materials used and developed at Ivy Tech Community College contain nothing unlawful, unethical, or libelous and do not constitute any violation of any right of privacy.


ADA STATEMENT:

Ivy Tech Community College seeks to provide reasonable accommodations for qualified individuals with documented disabilities. If you need an accommodation because of a documented disability, please contact the Office of Disability Support Services.

If you will require assistance during an emergency evacuation, notify your instructor immediately. Look for evacuation procedures posted in your classroom.
COURSE METHODOLOGY:

Students are expected to view American history from the domestic as well as from a global perspective. Draft lessons and assessments for Global Learning Across Indiana are in preparation.



WRITTEN ASSIGNMENTS:
DRAFT Discussion Board Assignments on next pages. Other materials and assignments are being drafted to introduce Global Learning materials into the Survey of American History I course. Please contact Professor Jack Cooney at 317-916-7930 jcooney@ivytech.edu for more assistance on this project.

GLAI Survey of American History I Course

DRAFT Assessment Materials

HIST 101 Syllabus Material for Discussion Board Assignments:

DISCUSSION BOARDS [Db]: Material from the textbook and additional sources are covered in the form of a question. The instructor will provide prompts for these two to three paragraph entries that ask students to think critically about historical issues as they relate to the subject matter of the course. In these entries, students should also seek to make connections between what they already know about history and what they are learning in this course. Students are required to respond at least four times for every Discussion Board topic; students must respond to each question posted by the instructor (the Initial Post) and to at least three other students' responses as well. Answers must be meaningful and relevant; please do not respond by simply saying "I agree" or “I disagree” without explanation. Dbs must be completed by the end of the week they are assigned on the Course Calendar.

Discussion Board Assignment Number 1

To receive full credit, students must respond to each question posted by the instructor by 11:59 PM on the Wednesday of each session and post three additional responses (replies to other students’ posts) by 11:59 PM on the Sunday of each session. Answers must be meaningful and relevant; please do not respond by simply saying "I agree" or “I disagree” without explanation.  Please consult the grading rubric for the Discussion Boards, which is located under the Resources tab on Blackboard.



Covering Chapters 7 and 8 in AMERICA: A Concise History:

Citing selected material in the article Humboldt in the New World, describe how the explorations of this natural scientist from Prussia contributed to the expectations leading citizens of the new United States of America had for the role exploration and discovery might yet play in the successful flourishing of their “empire of liberty.”

Humboldt in the New World

http://www.neh.gov/humanities/2012/novemberdecember/feature/humboldt-in-the-new-world

Discussion Board Assignment Number 2

To receive full credit, students must respond to each question posted by the instructor by 11:59 PM on the Wednesday of each session and post three additional responses (replies to other students’ posts) by 11:59 PM on the Sunday of each session. Answers must be meaningful and relevant; please do not respond by simply saying "I agree" or “I disagree” without explanation.  Please consult the grading rubric for the Discussion Boards, which is located under the Resources tab on Blackboard.



Covering Chapters 7 and 8 in AMERICA: A Concise History:

Citing selected material in the from the website Alexander von Humboldt in Washington (1804), describe what effect on leading American citizens of the visit Humboldt made to Philadelphia and Washington, DC. What mutual advantages did the German explorer and his American hosts seek to offer each other? Name one point of contact that you can offer as an early example of the theme of “globalization” at work in the United States even in 1804. Offer your “coherent defensible interpretation” to tell how the example you selected affects your own role in either welcoming or challenging greater your own greater global engagement.



Alexander von Humboldt in Washington (1804)

https://maxkade.drupal.ku.edu/subwashington


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