Guide to the Presidency



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Presidential and Vice Presidential Salaries
Exclusive of Perquisites


Data from Congressional Quarterly's Guide to the Presidency

Year

President

Vice President

Cabinet

1789

$25,000

$5,000



1873

$50,000

$10,000



1906

$50,000

$12,000



1909

$75,000

$12,000



1946

$75,000

$20,000



1949

$100,000
$50,000 non-taxable expense account


$30,000
$10,000 non-taxable expense account




1951

$100,000
$50,000 non-taxable expense account


$35,000
$10,000 non-taxable expense account




1953

$100,000
$50,000 taxable expense account


$35,000
$10,000 taxable expense account




1964

$100,000
$50,000 taxable expense account


$43,000
$10,000 taxable expense account




1969

$200,000
$50,000 taxable expense account


$62,500
$10,000 taxable expense account




1979

$200,000
$50,000 non-taxable expense account


$62,500
$10,000 taxable expense account




1994

$200,000
$50,000 non-taxable expense account


$171,000
$10,000 taxable expense account




2001

$400,000

$175,400

$161,200

2003

$400,000

$198,600

$171,900

2003 data from CRS Report http://www.senate.gov/reference/resources/pdf/98-53.pdf Effective January 1, 2001, the annual salary of the president of the United States was increased to $400,000 per year, including a $50,000 expense allowance.

Presidential Trivia

Who was the only bachelor to lead the nation?


Presidents Who Were Related to Each Other

  • John Adams was the father of John Quincy Adams.

  • James Madison and Zachary Taylor were second cousins.

  • William Henry Harrison was the grandfather of Benjamin Harrison.

  • Franklin Delano Roosevelt was a fifth cousin of Theodore Roosevelt.

  • George W. Bush is the son of George Bush.

  • More...

Before I Became President...

  • Twenty-six Presidents were lawyers before becoming president.

  • Twelve presidents were generals: Washington, Jackson, W. Harrison, Taylor, Pierce, A. Johnson, Grant, Hayes, Garfield, Arthur, B. Harrison, and Eisenhower. At the end of the American Revolution, the suggestion that General Washington become king circulated in the Army's upper ranks. Washington reacted strongly against the idea, saying, "no occurrence in the course of the War has given me more painful sensations."

  • Nine years after leaving the presidency, Taft was appointed chief justice of the Supreme Court. So pleased was he with this career change that he later wrote, "I don't remember that I was ever president."

  • George Washington's salary as president was $25,000. Bush's salary is $400,000.

  • More Presidents' Occupations

Related Links

  • Presidential Factfile

  • Almanac: U.S. Presidents

  • Presidents' Day Quiz

  • Hangman: U.S. Presidents

  • Presidential Quotes

  • Famous Presidential Speeches

  • First Families

  • Presidents' Gallery

  • First Ladies' Gallery



Presidential Trivia
Barack Obama is the 44th president but there actually have only been 42 presidents: Cleveland was elected for two nonconsecutive terms and is counted twice, as our 22nd and 24th president.

Eight Presidents were born British subjects: Washington, J. Adams, Jefferson, Madison, Monroe, J. Q. Adams, Jackson, and W. Harrison.

Nine Presidents never attended college: Washington, Jackson, Van Buren, Taylor, Fillmore, Lincoln, A. Johnson, Cleveland, and Truman. The college that has the most presidents as alumni (six in total) is Harvard: J. Adams, J. Q. Adams, T. Roosevelt, F. Roosevelt, Kennedy, and G. W. Bush (business school). Yale is a close second, with five presidents as alumni: Taft, Ford (law school), G.H.W. Bush, Clinton (law school), and G. W. Bush.

Presidents who would be considered "Washington outsiders" (i.e., the 18 presidents who never served in Congress) are: Washington, J. Adams, Jefferson, Taylor, Grant, Arthur, Cleveland, T. Roosevelt, Taft, Wilson, Coolidge, Hoover, F. Roosevelt, Eisenhower, Carter, Reagan, Clinton, and G. W. Bush.

The most common religious affiliation among presidents has been Episcopalian, followed by Presbyterian.

The ancestry of 43 presidents is limited to the following seven heritages, or some combination thereof: Dutch, English, Irish, Scottish, Welsh, Swiss, or German. (Obama—African)

The oldest elected president was Reagan (age 69); the youngest was Kennedy (age 43). Theodore Roosevelt, however, was the youngest man to become president—he was 42 when he succeeded McKinley, who had been assassinated. THE OLDEST LIVING former president was Gerald Ford, who was born on July 14, 1913, and died on Dec.27, 2006, at age 93. The second oldest was Ronald Reagan, who also lived to be 93 years.

The tallest president was Lincoln at 6'4"; at 5'4", Madison was the shortest.

Fourteen Presidents served as vice presidents: J. Adams, Jefferson, Van Buren, Tyler, Fillmore, A. Johnson, Arthur, T. Roosevelt, Coolidge, Truman, Nixon, L. Johnson, Ford, and George H.W. Bush.

Vice Presidents were originally the presidential candidates receiving the second-largest number of electoral votes. The Twelfth Amendment, passed in 1804, changed the system so that the electoral college voted separately for president and vice president. The presidential candidate, however, gradually gained power over the nominating convention to choose his own running mate.

For two years the nation was run by a president and a vice president who were not elected by the people. After Vice President Spiro T. Agnew resigned in 1973, President Nixon appointed Gerald Ford as vice president. Nixon resigned the following year, which left Ford as president, and Ford's appointed vice president, Nelson Rockefeller, as second in line.

Four Presidents won the popular vote but lost the presidency: Andrew Jackson won the popular vote but lost the election to John Quincy Adams (1824); Samuel J. Tilden won the popular vote but lost the election to Rutherford B. Hayes (1876); Grover Cleveland won the popular vote but lost the election to Benjamin Harrison (1888); Al Gore won the popular vote but lost the election to George W. Bush (2000).

The term "First Lady" was first used in 1877 in reference to Lucy Ware Webb Hayes. Most First Ladies, including Jackie Kennedy, are said to have hated the label.

James Buchanan was the only president never to marry. Five presidents remarried after the death of their first wives—two of whom, Tyler and Wilson, remarried while in the White House. Reagan was the only divorced president. Six presidents had no children. Tyler—father of fifteen—had the most.

Presidents Lincoln, Garfield, McKinley, and Kennedy were assassinated in office.

Assassination attempts were made on the lives of Jackson, T. Roosevelt, F. Roosevelt, Truman, Ford, and Reagan.

Eight Presidents died in office: W. Harrison (after having served only one month), Taylor, Lincoln, Garfield, McKinley, Harding, F. Roosevelt, and Kennedy.

Presidents Adams, Jefferson, and Monroe all died on the 4th of July; Coolidge was born on that day.

Kennedy and Taft are the only presidents buried in Arlington National Cemetery.

Lincoln, Jefferson, F. Roosevelt, Washington, Kennedy, and Eisenhower are portrayed on U.S. coins.

Washington, Jefferson, Lincoln, Jackson, Grant, McKinley, Cleveland, Madison, and Wilson are portrayed on U.S. paper currency.

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