Guide to Document Based Questions for Grades 6-12



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North Plainfield School District



Teacher Guide to Document Based Questions for Grades 6-12
2013-2014 School Year

Table of Contents

Introduction page 3
Document Based Questions page 3
DBQ Skills and Expectations Grades 6-12 page 3
Useful Links for DBQs page 4
How to Write a DBQ pages 5-10
DBQ Essay Organizers pages 8-9
6th Grade Document Based Questions Expectations pages 11-12
Document Based Question Rubric Steps 1-4 (6th grade) pages 13-16
Student Samples of DBQ Essay (7th grade) pages 17-21
Student Sample of DBQ Essay (High School) pages 22-23
DBQ Essay Writing Rubric pages 24-26
Resources/References page 27

Introduction

The information provided across the following pages serves as an aide for teachers who will be implementing document based questions throughout all social studies classes. The information contained within should be used as a tool for teachers to answer or help to clarify any questions you may have as well as to establish a structure that will be reinforced for all students as they progress from grades six through twelve.

Included among the pages of this guide are information on how to structure a response to a document based question, samples of document based questions with student responses, possible sites to explore to help craft your own document based questions, and an approved rubric to review with your students and to use for proper scoring of their responses.

We hope that the information provided is beneficial to you and helps to place everyone on the same page moving forward in terms of how we look to prepare our students over the coming years.



Document Based Questions

Document-based questions (DBQs) are for all students, from elementary school through high school. They are a type of authentic assessment and a way for students to interact with historical records.

A DBQ asks students to read and analyze historical records, gather information and fill in short scaffolding response questions, assimilate and synthesize information from several documents, and then respond (usually as a written essay) to an assigned task, by using information gleaned from the documents as well as their own outside information.

DBQs help students compare and contrast issues from differing perspectives, reconcile differing positions, evaluate the strength of particular arguments, provide authentic opportunities at a high level of thinking, and develop life skills.

DBQs will be featured on all North Plainfield social studies common assessment tests and teachers are expected to utilize DBQs throughout the course of the school year in all social studies classes.

DBQ Skills and Expectations for Grades 6-12
1. Differentiate between primary and secondary sources.

2. Categorize information in order to analyze and evaluate what the information means.

3. Analyze documents in a variety of formats (photos, letters, political cartoons, etc,).

4. Cite documents in the written response when answering the task.

5. Describe the historical context of the documents.

6. Use outside information of history other then what the documents specifically state.

7. Compare and contrast in order to make an argument.

8. Identify points of view of the author.

9. Write a correct thesis specific to the writing task.

10. Construct an essay to answer a task relating to the overall theme of the document.



Useful Links for DBQs
Included below are links to sites pertaining to document based questions. Use the information to expand your knowledge of DBQs and aide you as you look to create your own assessments for use throughout the school year.

http://www.kn.pacbell.com/wired/fil/pages/listdocumentpa.html

http://blogs.loc.gov/teachers/2012/02/document-based-questions-and-primary-sources/

http://apcentral.collegeboard.com/apc/members/courses/teachers_corner/3497.html#name3

http://womhist.alexanderstreet.com/teacher/dbqs.htm

http://wvsocialstudies.com/dbq/

http://www.museumwise.org/dhp/information-resources/dbqs

http://www.dbqproject.com/index.php

http://www.socialstudiescentral.com/content/primary-sources

http://web001.greece.k12.ny.us/academics.cfm?subpage=29878#Civil%20Rights%20DBQ%2008.03




How to Write A DBQ (Document Based Question)
Use the information below as both a teacher’s guide as well as to introduce DBQs to the students. It is recommended that the process be broken down into smaller steps and modeled for students in order for them to be successful and produce good quality work.
What is a DBQ?

DBQ stands for Document Based Question. It is a type of essay that provides you with documents to serve as sources of information for your writing. The DBQ does not test your content knowledge, but tests your reading comprehension and analysis skills. By following this guide, you will be able to write a DBQ on any topic!


Each DBQ you take will look very similar. There are certain things that are always given to you:


  • Historical Context: This is a paragraph that tells you some background information about the topic of the essay. This will help you write your introduction.




  • Task: This is the actual question that you are attempting to answer in the essay. This will help you to write your thesis. The thesis can be the first or last sentence of your introduction. You will learn how to write a thesis in the pages that follow.



  • Documents and Scaffolding Questions: There will typically be 5-7 documents that will be used to help you write your essay. Each document may have anywhere from 1-3 questions that you must answer before writing the essay. These questions will help get you thinking about how to shape your essay.

Step One: Analyze the task. Without a clear understanding of what the task is asking you to do, you cannot write a good answer in a full sentence.
The task may ask you to do any of the following things:


  • Analyze – determine their component parts; examine their nature and relationship

  • Assess/Evaluate – judge the value or character of something; appraise; evaluate the positive points and the negative ones; give an opinion regarding the value of; discuss the advantages and disadvantages of

  • Compare – examine for the purpose of noting similarities and differences.

  • Contrast – examine in order to show dissimilarities or points of difference.

  • Describe – give an account of; tell about; give a word picture of.

  • Discuss – talk over; write about; consider or examine by argument or from various points of view; debate; present the different sides of the topic.

  • Explain – make clear or plain; make clear the causes or reasons for; make known in detail; tell the meaning of.


Step Two: Understand key terms within the question.
All DBQs should address either attitudes and reactions, or political, economic, social (class), cultural, and technological aspects within the question (you will know what to address because those specific words will be in the question).

http://pad3.whstatic.com/images/thumb/8/82/write-a-dbq-essay-step-2.jpg/550px-write-a-dbq-essay-step-2.jpg

Step Three: Pay attention to the time period of the documents.

http://pad3.whstatic.com/images/thumb/1/1d/write-a-dbq-essay-step-3.jpg/550px-write-a-dbq-essay-step-3.jpg


Step Four: Read the documents and answer the scaffolding questions.


  • Read the documents carefully and answer the scaffolding questions (additional questions that make you think critically about the topic).

  • Each document may have 1-3 questions that follow that you must answer before writing the essay.

  • These questions will help get you thinking about how to shape your essay and will help in writing the thesis statement.


Step Five: Develop a Thesis. This is your opinion on the given topic
Theses must be stated in your opening paragraph. It is normally the last sentence in your opening paragraph. The reader must immediately know your position on the question before reading the rest of your essay. For full credit on your essays you must clearly state your position.

How to write a thesis statement:

  1. State your opinion on the topic. Your thesis must argue a position and state your opinion.

  2. A DBQ thesis should be one sentence.

  3. Use the documents in the DBQ to come up with three supporting reasons that help explain your position. Your DBQ can use outside information, but you must use all of the documents in the DBQ to help explain your answer.



Tips for writing a successful DBQ thesis:

  • If you are stuck turning your thesis into one sentence, use “because” as a link between your opinion statement and the three reasons why your opinion is correct.

  • These statements do a great job at condensing the paper's argument into a single sentence. They are direct and answer a question by offering ways to understand the subject matter. In fact, viewing a thesis statement as an answer to the question your paper explores is a great framework with which to build your thesis.



Example thesis statements:

  • Hemingway's stories helped create a new prose style by employing extensive dialogue, shorter sentences, and strong Anglo-Saxon words.

  • The Walking Dead is the best show on TV due to its graphic but well placed violence, outstanding make up, and credible actors


Step Six: Outline Your Essay:

  • Before beginning the essay, you should always create an outline.

  • Below are two different DBQ organizers that can help to organize the information you want to use in your essay.

  • The outlines below are suggestions and may need to be changed based on the DBQ assigned. You can choose to set up the essay outline to fit your needs as long as you keep the same elements.




Document # and Description

Document Information

Outside Information

Document #
Brief description of the document:


Describe what the document is about:
*Use answers from the DBQ questions for document information.
*Make sure you focus on answering the task (essay question)

**Make sure to answer the TASK (essay question) with outside information.
-Bring in outside information related to that particular document.

Document # ‘s _______

(Body Paragraph)







Document #’s _______

(Body Paragraph)







Document # ‘s _______

(Body Paragraph)








Document # ‘s _______

(Body Paragraph)











DBQ Essay Organizer
Thesis Statement:






Body Paragraphs: (There should be 1 box for each task/reason)


Doc #’s Details/examples from the document and Analysis

Outside Information




Doc #’s Details/examples from the document and Analysis

Outside Information




Doc #’s Details/examples from the document and Analysis

Outside Information


Conclusion: (Restate the thesis & information from introduction to end your essay.)






Step Seven: Write the Introductory Paragraph.


  • Start with a sentence that grabs the reader's attention – this can be from historical background

  • State your thesis

  • Explain what you are going to talk about (lead your reader through your essay)

  • Do not explain the historical background – the graders already know the background (they gave it to you)


Step Eight: Write the Body Paragraphs. Analyze, analyze, analyze. Do not just state facts. Tie them to the thesis and explain how they prove the thesis.


  • It is important that you support your thesis while referencing the documents.

  • When referencing the documents make sure to analyze what the document or person is saying and, if possible, why they are saying what they are saying (explain their background).

  • When using the documents do not quote directly – remember you are only referencing them, as you would do in a term paper.

  • If you decide to quote one of the documents directly do it in a meaningful way. This usually means quote sparingly (quote only part of the document, and only do this method with one or two documents). Be sure to cite it properly.

  • Name the person and what they are in your sentence. At the end of each sentence write the document number in parentheses in abbreviated form. e.g. Peter Kropotkin, an anarchist, mocked the idea of “order” by illuminating the disease-ridden peasants, stolen peasant’s crops, & uncultivated land (Doc 4).

  • Do not just list the documents as they are presented in the DBQ. You must have some kind of analysis involved with them.

  • Facts should be organized in logical sequence

  • Each set of facts should be in a separate paragraph

  • Refute arguments contrary to your thesis if you can



Step Nine: Write the conclusion.


  • The conclusion should bring the reader back to your thesis and the question.

  • No new information should be added!



DBQ Tips:

  • Don't just summarize each document. Tie them all together.

  • Make sure to make an outline to guide your essay with main ideas or topics of importance.

  • Follow your outline, but beef up the main points in the essay.

  • Add relevant outside information.

  • Explain why three of the articles might be biased (doing this will get you an extra point on the DBQ).

  • For students who get timed, try to practice at home by timing yourself.


6th Grade Document Based Questions Expectations
Since students are beginning DBQs in the 6th grade, they should start off slowly as an introduction, and then skills that students need to master will be added as they progress. The following bullet points explain how DBQs will be presented to students as the year goes on. Each bullet point links up to a corresponding rubric that explains what students are expected to be able to do. The rubrics are tiered in order of difficulty, as the level of difficulty rises at the conclusion of each DBQ. The numbering system used for the DBQs will be at the teacher’s discretion, and they may adjust the pace accordingly (i.e. students need to continue to review a skill before moving on). The goal for the 6th grade is to get students through steps 1 through 4 gradually as the year progresses, and to the essay portion by the end of the school year. Teachers at the middle and high school levels can introduce these skills as they see fit, according to their classes’ particular abilities.

  • DBQ Step 1: Introductory DBQ: Students will be asked to create a few sentences about each document; documents will be presented in a variety of formats. (i.e. Pictures, secondary source readings, etc.). Students should be able to cite the text to describe where they got the information. (See Rubric 1)



  • DBQ Step 2: In addition to viewing information from a variety of formats, students will analyze the difference between primary and secondary sources. In addition, map skills will be added to the DBQs. (See Rubric 2)



  • DBQ Step 3: What is the historical context of each document? DBQ will show students how to find the main idea of each paragraph. (See Rubric 3)



  • DBQ Step 4: Students will continue to use the skills learned in previous DBQs and will be able to form a thesis statement. The thesis statements should argue a position and state an opinion of the material, and should include at least 3 documents to support it. (See Rubric 4)



  • Ongoing skills: Students will continue to utilize all of the previously listed skills. These include:

A. Analyze documents in a variety of formats (pictures, secondary sources, etc.)

B. Cite documents to answer questions.

C. Differentiate between primary and secondary sources.

D. Utilize map skills (these include measuring the distances between areas, locating different parts of the world, and answering how exchange or travel affected civilizations).

E. Describe the historical context of the documents.

F. Form a thesis statement that argues a position and states an opinion of the material, and includes at least 3 documents to support it

G. Ongoing: In addition, students will continue to look at information in a variety of formats such as timelines and charts that compare forms of government.

H. Construct an essay following a rubric (see step 5).



  • DBQ Step 5: Students will utilize the skills that they learned in previous DBQs and will be able to construct an essay. They will be able to utilize the documents to write an essay that summarizes the material to answer a question such as “Describe daily life in ancient Rome.” (See Essay Rubric at the end of this packet)


Reading and Analyzing Information: Document Based Question Rubric Step 1


CATEGORY

4

3

2

1

Score

Identifies facts

Student uses relevant facts from the DBQ, and cites where in the document they found the information.

Student uses mostly relevant facts from the DBQ, and cites where in the document they found the information.

Student uses some relevant facts from the DBQ, and sometimes cites where in the document they found the information.

Student uses information mostly not found in the DBQ, and does not cite where in the document they found the information.




Visual Information

Student is able to correctly analyze ___ or more pieces of visual information, such as maps, charts, and pictures.

Student is able to correctly analyze ___ or more pieces of visual information, such as maps, charts, and pictures.

Student is able to correctly analyze ___ or more pieces of visual information, such as maps, charts, and pictures.

Student is not able to correctly analyze any visual information, such as maps, charts, and pictures.





Reading and Analyzing Information: Document Based Question Rubric Step 2


CATEGORY

4

3

2

1

Score

Identifies facts

Student uses relevant facts from the DBQ, and cites where in the document they found the information.

Student uses mostly relevant facts from the DBQ, and cites where in the document they found the information.

Student uses some relevant facts from the DBQ, and sometimes cites where in the document they found the information.

Student uses information mostly not found in the DBQ, and does not cite where in the document they found the information.




Visual Information

Student is able to correctly analyze ___ or more pieces of visual information, such as maps, charts, and pictures.

Student is able to correctly analyze ___ or more pieces of visual information, such as maps, charts, and pictures.

Student is able to correctly analyze ___ or more pieces of visual information, such as maps, charts, and pictures.

Student is not able to correctly analyze any visual information, such as maps, charts, and pictures.




Primary and Secondary Sources

Student is able to correctly describe the difference between a primary and secondary source.

Student is able to mostly describe the difference between a primary and secondary source.

Student is sometimes able to describe the difference between a primary and secondary source.

Student cannot correctly analyze the difference between a primary and secondary source.





Reading and Analyzing Information: Document Based Question Rubric Step 3


CATEGORY

4

3

2

1

Score

Identifies facts

Student uses relevant facts from the DBQ, and cites where in the document they found the information.

Student uses mostly relevant facts from the DBQ, and cites where in the document they found the information.

Student uses some relevant facts from the DBQ, and sometimes cites where in the document they found the information.

Student uses information mostly not found in the DBQ, and does not cite where in the document they found the information.




Visual Information

Student is able to correctly analyze ___ or more pieces of visual information, such as maps, charts, and pictures.

Student is able to correctly analyze ___ or more pieces of visual information, such as maps, charts, and pictures.

Student is able to correctly analyze ___ or more pieces of visual information, such as maps, charts, and pictures.

Student is not able to correctly analyze any visual information, such as maps, charts, and pictures.




Primary and Secondary Sources

Student is able to correctly describe the difference between a primary and secondary source.

Student is able to mostly describe the difference between a primary and secondary source.

Student is sometimes able to describe the difference between a primary and secondary source.

Student cannot correctly analyze the difference between a primary and secondary source.




Historical Context

Student is able to accurately state the historical context of the DBQ in their own words.

Student is able to mostly state the historical context of the DBQ in their own words.

Student provides a vague historical context of the DBQ in their own words.

Student does not provide an accurate historical context of the DBQ.
Historical context is not in student's own words.





Reading and Analyzing Information: Document Based Question Rubric Step 4


CATEGORY

4

3

2

1

Score

Identifies facts

Student uses relevant facts from the DBQ, and cites where in the document they found the information.

Student uses mostly relevant facts from the DBQ, and cites where in the document they found the information.

Student uses some relevant facts from the DBQ, and sometimes cites where in the document they found the information.

Student uses information mostly not found in the DBQ, and does not cite where in the document they found the information.




Visual Information

Student is able to correctly analyze ___ or more pieces of visual information, such as maps, charts, and pictures.

Student is able to correctly analyze ___ or more pieces of visual information, such as maps, charts, and pictures.

Student is able to correctly analyze ___ or more pieces of visual information, such as maps, charts, and pictures.

Student is not able to correctly analyze any visual information, such as maps, charts, and pictures.




Primary and Secondary Sources

Student is able to correctly describe the difference between a primary and secondary source.

Student is able to mostly describe the difference between a primary and secondary source.

Student is sometimes able to describe the difference between a primary and secondary source.

Student cannot correctly analyze the difference between a primary and secondary source.




Historical Context

Student is able to accurately state the historical context of the DBQ in their own words.

Student is able to mostly state the historical context of the DBQ in their own words.

Student provides a vague historical context of the DBQ in their own words.

Student does not provide an accurate historical context of the DBQ.
Historical context is not in student's own words.




Thesis Statement

Student includes a thesis statement that argues a position and states an opinion of the material.
Student uses 3 documents to support thesis statement.

Student includes a thesis statement that argues a position and states an opinion of the material.
Student uses 2 documents to support thesis statement.

Student includes a thesis statement that argues a position or states an opinion of the material.
Student uses 1 document to support thesis statement.

Student does not include a thesis statement that argues a position and does not state an opinion of the material.
Student uses no documents to support thesis statement.





Student Samples of a Middle School (7th Grade)

DBQ Writing Task and Response

Students were given two documents on rulers of the African kingdom of Mali and were required to analyze the documents, answer the scaffolding questions, and write a minimum of a three-paragraph response to the writing task below. There are three samples of student work on the pages to follow.



Writing Task: What characteristics do Sundiata and Mansa Musa seem to have in common? What is different about them? Use examples from Document 1 and Document 2 to support your answer.

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Student Sample of a High School (AP U.S. History)

DBQ Writing Task and Response

The following writing task was retrieved from the following school website: http://linux.belleville.k12.wi.us/main/


Students were given a DBQ relating to the American Revolution, which included pictures, primary source documents, and maps. The writing task is listed below, with a sample response that followed. (Note: Documents were cited in parenthesis to fit the model in accordance with North Plainfield School District.)


Writing Task: Using the documents and your understanding of the Revolutionary War period, analyze the extent to which the American Revolutionary War was truly "revolutionary?"




Sample Response
A revolution is an event that forever changes the life and politics of a certain people. These revolutions often have different degrees that they go to, from little change at all to very radical. The Revolutionary War that occurred in the United States is an example of a revolution that was very radical. This war forever altered the social, political, and economic structure of the colonies, illustrating how radical the revolution really was. The American Revolution was actually a very radical revolution that completely changed all aspects of society.
The Revolutionary War was a social revolution because the colonies began to see themselves as interdependent rather than being subject to the will of the British government. The historian Gordon Wood said "The Revolution resembles the breaking of a dam, releasing thousands upon thousands of pent up pressures. There had been seepage and flow before the Revolution, but suddenly it was as if the whole traditional structure, enfeebled and brittle to begin with, broke apart, and people and their energies were set loose in an unprecedented outburst." (Document G) This completely changed all of the social culture that had existed before the revolution. It altered the complete structure of the relationship between England and America, illustrating how radical the revolution really was. For example in Thomas Paine’s Common Sense he used the metaphor of a satellite that was no more fit to rule the sun than England was to rule the American continent. (It didn’t make sense to the people that such a small country like Britain would be controlling them when they were so much larger and so far away.) Most of the governors that were in charge of America had never even set foot on the continent. Patrick Henry made an important statement when he said, "The war is inevitable--and let it come! I repeat it, sir, let it come!" (Document F) He is saying that breaking from England is a natural course to follow. The colonists were just obeying human nature in their wants to be independent and self-ruling. For the first time in history the colonists began to think for themselves and unite as one power and stand up against English rule.
The colonists were tired of being used by Britain for monetary gain. They were ready to make major changes in their economic system. This was evident in the engraving of the Boston Massacre done by Paul Revere. (Document A) The colonists chaffed under the constant array of acts, such as the Stamp Act and the Sugar Act, and went to do the customs houses to protest their oppression. This showed how badly they wanted to change what they considered the unjust taxation that Britain had forced upon them. Another open revolt based on economics was the Boston Tea Party. (Document B) This was caused solely by what the colonists saw as a tax used only to save an English company. Another example of how greatly the economy was altered was the huge change in the borders of the colonies. Previously, Britain had limited how far the colonists could expand. (Documents H and I). With the end of the revolution, the colonists rapidly began to expand westward, not stopping until they reached another ocean to hem them in. This change in borders completely altered the entire economy of the colonies. It allowed them much greater land to farm in and also helped their population expand. Not only that, it was a complete break from the Proclamation of 1763 which had set the western border on the colonies. (Documents H and I). The Boston Massacre and the rapid expansion of the colonies illustrate how much the colonists chaffed under England’s rule and how radical the economic revolution in America really was.
The government of the colonies was also completely altered after the revolution. The complete alteration of the form of government can be seen in Galloway’s Plan of Union. Previously, the colonists had absolutely no say in the election of the Parliament that ruled them. They now had formed a plan that called for the open election of their own ruling body, one that would not be affected by the Parliament in England. (Document D) This illustrates what a complete reversal the governing style that the colonists had gone through. Another example of the political change that the colonists experienced were the resolves passed by the First Continental Congress. This departure from previous governing style can be seen when the Congress said, "The several Acts which impose duties for the purpose of raising a revenue in America, extend powers of the admiralty courts beyond their ancient limits, deprive the American subject of trial by jury, authorize the judges’ certificate to indemnify the prosecutor from damages that he might otherwise be liable to, requiring oppressive security from a claimant ships and goods seized before he shall be allowed to defend his property; and are subversive of American rights." (Document E) The colonists also feared the power of Parliament as was stated in the Declaration of the Causes and Necessity of Taking up Arms. This said that there had to be some limiting of the power that the government could hold over an individual. These complete departures from the previous governing style that England had used illustrate how radical the political revolution that occurred in America really was.
The structure of America was forever changed by the Revolutionary War. This was exemplified socially by things like Thomas Paine’s Common Sense, and the radicalism of Patrick Henry. The desire for economic change was illustrated by The Boston Massacre and the Boston Tea Party. And the change in political life was demonstrated by things like Galloway’s Plan of Union, and the resolves of the First Continental Congress. The revolution in America was actually very radical, with their belief that "you can’t let the tail wag the dog."


Document Based Question Essay Writing Rubric
Teachers in grades 6-12 will use the DBQ Essay Rubric on the next two pages when grading the essay portion of the DBQ. This rubric has been aligned with the new PARCC writing rubric for ELA while also incorporating what is needed in writing a correct DBQ response.
It will be necessary to make copies of the rubric (front to back) to give to the students. The rubric should be reviewed with students for clarification and so they know what is expected. Using the same rubric in all of the grades will make expectations for the written responses on DBQs consistent for students no matter what grade they are in or what social studies teacher they have.
Since the amount of documents vary in DBQs, in the “Score of 4” and “Score of 3” the amount of documents needed in order to earn that score are left blank on the DBQ Essay Writing Rubric. How many documents that you choose to use in your DBQ will determine how many documents are needed to secure that score.

Name:______________________________


Document Based Question Essay Writing Rubric

Score of 4:

Thesis relates directly to task

Student is able to create thoughts that are independent from reading

Includes relevant information from at least ____ documents; evidence is properly cited

Supports task with relevant facts, examples, details, and outside information

Writing is well organized; it includes an introduction and a conclusion with supporting details that go

beyond restating the topic sentence

Very few, if any grammatical errors; meaning is clear throughout the response

Comments: __________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Score of 3:

Thesis mostly relates to the task

Student is able to create thoughts that are independent from reading

Includes relevant information from at least ____ documents; evidence is properly cited

Supports task with relevant facts, examples, details, and outside information

Writing is well organized; it includes an introduction and a conclusion with supporting details that go

beyond restating the topic sentence

Few grammatical errors; meaning is still clear throughout the response

Comments: __________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Score of 2:

Thesis somewhat relates to the task

Student is able to create some thoughts that are independent from reading

Includes some relevant information from some of the documents

Supports task with relevant facts, examples, details, and outside information; may include some minor

errors in information

Writing is organized; it includes an introduction and a conclusion that may only restate the topic sentence

Some errors in grammar that may sometimes distract the reader

Comments: __________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Score of 1:

Thesis does not relate to the task

Student does not create original thoughts, work is mainly copied facts; essay may include false or weak

information

Includes little relevant information from the documents

Includes few relevant facts, examples, details, and outside information; may include some inaccuracies

 Writing is somewhat organized; it may lack a clear focus; arguments may not be consistent; may not stay

on task; may lack an introduction and/or a conclusion

Multiple errors in grammar that occasionally distract the reader

Comments: __________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________


Score of 0:

No thesis statement is provided

Incorrect or incomplete essay (too short)

Includes no relevant facts, examples, details, or outside information; writing is inaccurate or off topic

Little to no effort shown

Writing is illegible

No response is provided

Comments: __________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________



Scoring Guide:
4= A (90-100)
3= B (80-89)
2= C (70-79)
1= D (60-69)
0= F (59 and below)

Final Score: ____________

Resources/References

“AP U.S. History: The DBQ”. The College Board, 2013. Web. 30 July 2013.

Eric Britton Design. The DBQ Project. Dpqproject.com, 2012. Web. 30 July 2013.

Fayetteville-Manlius Schools. How to Write a DBQ Essay. Web. 30 July 2013.

Goldstein, Paula. Primary Source Materials & Document Based Questions. An Internet Hotlist on Document Based Questions. Nassau BOCES, 25 Oct 2012. Web. 30 July 2013.

Hodgson. Sample DBQ - American Revolution. School District of Belleville, 2013. Web. 30 July 2013.

Museumwise, DBQ’s: Document Based Questions (DBQs). Museumwise.org, n.d. Web. 30 July 2013.

Savage, Anne. Document Based Questions and Primary Sources. Library of Congress, 8 Feb 2012. Web. 30 July 2013.

Social Studies Central. Primary Sources. Socialstudiescentral.com, n.d. Web. 30, July, 2013.

Summer, George. DBQ: DBQ Resource Page. Social Studies Resources. Blog at WordPress.com. WVsocialstudies.com, n.d. Web. 30 July 2013.

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