Guide to Country House Publications 2



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Country House Bibliography


Table of Contents

Part One – Annotated Guide
Annotated Guide to Country House Publications 2

Part Two – Full Bibliographies

Country House: General 7

Country House: Specific Counties and Cities 16

Country House: Specific House Histories 18

Country House: Research Reference Guides 22

Part One: Annotated Guide
Annotated Guide to Country House Publications
Airs, Malcolm. The Making of the English Country House, 1500-1640. London: The Architectural Press Ltd, 1975.
Using the building accounts of country houses and the correspondence of their builders, Malcolm Airs reveals that the period between 1500 and 1640 was one of transition for the English country house. In his book Airs examines country houses not in terms of architecture, but instead as buildings that were designed, financed and painstakingly constructed. He looks into the practical and everyday problems that building a country house entailed. While considering the builders of country houses he also explores the lives and experiences of those surveyors, craftsmen and labourers who built it. He finds that between 1500 and 1640 contemporary ideas about architecture were changing, with more significance being given to the intellectual and theoretical underpinnings of architectural practice. As a result the role of architect became more pronounced and in turn led to the increasing use of surveyors as onsite administrators of the building work. Although a perfect distinction between the two roles was not consolidated by 1640, the change had begun and affected how building took place. Airs’ work, like Wilson and Mackley’s for the later period, contends with the multiplicity of ways in which building country houses affected numerous people’s lives.
Arnold, Dana (ed.). The Georgian Country House: Architecture, Landscape, and Society. Stroud: Sutton, 1998.
Chapter 1 The Country House: Form, Function and Meaning Dana Arnold

Chapter2 The Country House and its Publics Dana Arnold

Chapter 3 Publishing Houses: Prints of Country Seats Tim Clayton

Chapter 4 One Among the Many: Popular Aesthetics, Polite Stephen Bending

Culture and the Country House Landscape

Chapter 5 Defining Femininity: Women and the Country House Dana Arnold

Chapter 6 The Illusion of Grandeur? Antiquity, Grand Tourism and Dana Arnold

the Country House

Chapter 7 Town House and Country House: their Interaction M.H. Port

Chapter 8 Jane Austen and the Changing Face of England Philippa Tristram

Chapter 9 Living off the Land: Innovations in Farming Practices and Dana Arnold

Farm Design



Chapter 10 Richard Payne Knight and the Picturesque Landscape Andrew Ballantyne
In this volume Dana Arnold, along with contributions from Tim Clayton, Stephen Bending M.H. Port, Philippa Tristram and Andrew Ballantyne, explores ‘the meaning of all kinds of architectural production’. Arnold and the other contributors use prints, literature and travelogues to examine what the country house meant in different social, political, economic and cultural contexts. How did its form and function affect what the country house was and what it could be? How was the country house represented in prints? Arnold and the other contributors explore how different publics have responded to country houses and the various meanings it has acquired as a result.
Christie, Christopher. The British Country House in the Eighteenth Century. Manchester: Manchester University Press, 2000.
Christopher Christie explores how the country house acted as an important player in the architectural, artistic, social and economic history of eighteenth-century Britain. Christie examines multiple aspects of the country house to provide a rounded view of its forms and functions. Alongside his description of how the lands and estates that surrounded country houses created wealth, Christie also highlights the different financial strategies by which country houses were built and embellished during this period. Through an exploration of the architecture constructed in the eighteenth century, Christie demonstrates the breadth of building that took place. He then populates his houses and their gardens with families, servants and furnishings, before describing the wide variety of activities and entertainments with which they were involved. Using financial accounts, plans, engravings, travel accounts and correspondence, Christie’s book provides an important starting place for considering the eighteenth-century country house in all its different guises.
Clemenson, Heather A. English Country Houses and Landed Estates. London and Canberra: Croon Helm, 1982.
Heather Clemenson explores the English country house as a visual symbol of wealth, status and power and tracks how it changed in the nineteenth and twentieth century. Clemenson divides her analysis into two temporal sections, first the period from the eighteenth century to around 1880 and second, from 1880 until 1982. She uses parliamentary papers, estate papers and contemporary published sources to examine the experiences of five hundred landed families during this period. In doing so she includes over a third of the largest private landowners in England in the late nineteenth century. What makes Clemenson’s analysis unique is her interest not only in country houses, their gardens and amenity lands as symbols of wealth and status, but that she also acknowledges the significance of agricultural and wood lands as symbols of power and prestige. Clemenson demonstrates the changing ‘visual impact’ of estates by plotting a trajectory of rise before 1880 and then eventual decline between that point and the post-war period. Clemenson completes the book by assessing the potential futures of the country house.

Elton, Arthur, Brett Harrison and Keith Wark. Researching the Country House: A Guide for Local Historians. London: B.T. Batsford Ltd, 1992.
Although slightly out of date due to the impact of the internet, Elton, Harrison and Wark’s book provides a good starting point for those interested in learning about and researching the country house in England. Researching the Country House explains how country houses and their estates were owned, built, managed and improved, the role of the landowner in society and the work performed by servants. Alongside this they also include discussions of the effects of industrialisation on the country house in the nineteenth century and its decline and conservation in the twentieth. During their explanation of each of these topics Elton, Harrison and Wark include suggestions about important sources, where they can be found, how to access them and the possible frustrations and challenges researchers may encounter. For example they show readers various ways of using bills, newspaper advertisements, architectural plans and correspondence. In doing so Elton, Harrison and Wark illuminate the wide variety of sources that historians can use to construct the histories of the country house.
Girouard, Mark. Life in the English Country House. New Haven: Yale University Press, 1978.
Rather than focusing upon who built the house, when and how, Mark Girouard seeks to examine how English country houses were used and what they were intended to do. Girouard understands the house as a social, political and economic space in which people outwardly performed particular roles. Girouard uses a range of sources to explore these topics including inventories, family papers, plans, travelogues and images. In his analysis he focuses on two themes, which he sees as central to understanding the country house and its role – power and pleasure. Traditionally the country house owner derived power from the land that made up his estate. Land earned rents, peopled armies and until the nineteenth century, created votes. How this calculation changed over time was intrinsically important to the role and meaning of the country house. At the same time, however, the country house was also a site of pleasure; specifically designed to allow its owners to fill their leisure hours ‘as agreeably as possible’. Girouard’s work provides an overview of the role of the country house from the medieval period until the 1940s.
Gomme, Andor and Alison Maguire. Design and Plan in the Country House: From Castle Donjons to Palladian Boxes. New Haven and London: Yale University Press, 2008.
Andor Gomme and Alison Maguire examine the changing design of the country house. More particularly, they explore the different factors that prompted the development of the double pile layout, where houses were more than one room deep. Through an analysis of plans, architecture and architects they demonstrate the role of technology, materials, politics, money, social habits and daily life in creating these new designs. Gomme and Maguire take a long view from the thirteenth and fourteenth centuries to the eighteenth. In doing so they pick out long threads of change towards ‘compact’ design and reassess what has previously been seen as a distinct shift in the seventeenth century. Design and Plan is particularly well illustrated and usefully includes ground plans alongside photos of specific houses. It provides the reader with a solid understanding of the processes from which the seventeenth- and eighteenth-century English country house emerged.
Holmes, Michael. The Country House Described: An Index to the Country Houses of Great Britain and Ireland. Winchester: St Paul’s Bibliographies, 1986.
The Country House Described is an important reference work for researching the country house and is available in most large libraries. It lists 4,000 country houses from different parts of England, Wales, Scotland and Ireland and provides references to all the literature relating to those individual houses. The literature that Holmes lists is available in the National Art Library at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London. The Country House Described is a particularly good guide to illustrations of houses, but also lists guides about individual houses, catalogues of collections, sales catalogues and Country Life articles. It offers a starting point for any research on particular country houses.
Mandler, Peter. The Fall and Rise of the Stately Home. London: Yale University Press, 1997.
In The Fall and Rise of the Stately Home, Peter Mandler critically examines the changing perceptions of the country house from c. 1815 until c. 1974. Mandler argues that it was not until the nineteenth century that people came to understand country houses as symbols of national heritage. In the early years of that century country houses opened their doors to an increasingly interested public. By the end of the nineteenth century, however, country houses were once again seen in an unflattering light. Finding themselves and their houses out of favour, the aristocracy withdrew from public view, a process which in some cases led to the dereliction of their homes. By the 1950s, as the aristocracy’s power reduced, country houses could be understood in a more generous light – as pieces of national heritage in need of conservation. Mandler’s research, which uses manuscript collections alongside newspapers and magazines, is important in encouraging us to question the changing status and meanings given to the country house by the general population. Far from a steady icon of English heritage, Mandler demonstrates that the image of the country house has been as vulnerable to the changing social, political and economic conditions as its owners.
Wilson, Richard and Alan Mackley. Creating Paradise: The Building of the English Country House, 1660-1880. London Hambledon and London, 2001.
In Creating Paradise, Richard Wilson and Alan Mackley reveal who built English country houses in the years between 1660 and 1880. They show why they built them, where they built them and how they financed such building. Concentrating on houses in Cheshire, Gloucestershire, Norfolk, Northamptonshire, Suffolk and Yorkshire, they explore the different experiences that inspired country house builders to build. More specifically, they also question why country house builders decided to build in certain styles, using particular architects. Wilson and Mackley also demonstrate the magnitude of building operations by focusing in on the details of the building process itself. For instance, they examine procedures such as how the materials were sourced, how they reached the site and how much the labourers were paid. Creating Paradise provides the reader with a solid understanding of the many costs and frustrations that people bore in order to build their country houses.

Part Two: Full Bibliographies
Country House: General
Airs, Malcolm (ed.). The Edwardian Great House. Oxford: University of Oxford, Department for Continuing Education, 2000.
Airs, Malcolm (ed.). The Victorian Great House. Oxford: University of Oxford, Department for Continuing Education, 2000.
Airs, Malcolm, (ed). The Later Eighteenth Century Great House. Oxford: University of Oxford, Department for Continuing Education, 1997.
Airs, Malcolm. The Tudor & Jacobean Country House: A Building History. Stroud: Sutton, 1995.
Airs, Malcolm. The Making of the English Country House. London: The Architectural Press Ltd, 1975.
Arnold, Dana (ed.). The Georgian Country House: Architecture, Landscape, and Society. Stroud: Sutton, 1998.
Baird, Rosemary. Mistress of the House: Great Ladies and Grand Houses, 1670-1830. London: Weidenfeld and Nicolson, 2003.
Barstow, Phyllida. The English Country House Party. Wellingborough: Equation, 1989.
Beckett, John Vincent. ‘Country House Life’, Historical Journal, 45:1 (2002), 235-44.
Bence-Jones, Mark. Great English Homes: Ancestral Homes of England and Wales and the People Who Lived in Them. London: National Trust: Weidenfeld and Nicolson, 1984.
Bence-Jones, Mark. Life in an Irish Country House. London: Constable, 1996.
Bence-Jones, Mark. Palaces of the Raj. London: Allen and Unwin, 1973.
Beresford, M.W. ‘Building History from Insurance Records’, Urban History Yearbook, (1976), 7-14.
Chadarevian, Soraya de. ‘Laboratory Science versus Country-House Experiments: The Controversy between Julius Sachs and Charles Darwin’, British Journal for the History of Science, 29:1 (1996), 17-41.

Christie, Christopher. The British Country House in the Eighteenth Century. Manchester: Manchester University Press, 2000.
Ciro, Jennifer. ‘Country House Libraries in the Nineteenth Century’, Library History, 18:2 (2002), 89-98.
Clemenson, H.A. English Country Houses and Landed Estates. London and Canberra: Croon Helm, 1982.
Cliffe, John Trevor. The World of the Country House in Seventeenth-Century England. New Haven, CT and London: Yale University Press, 1999.
Coffey, Laura. ‘Evelyn Waugh’s Country House Trinity: Memory, History and Catholicism in Brideshead Revisited’, Literature & History, 15:1 (2006), 59-73.
Colvin, Howard Montagu. ‘Lease or Demolish? The Problem of the Redundant Country House in Georgian England’, Airs, Malcolm (ed.). The Later Eighteenth Century Great House. Oxford: University of Oxford, Department for Continuing Education, 1997.
Conner, Patrick. Oriental Architecture in the West. London: Thames and Hudson, 1979.
Coope, R. ‘The “Long Gallery”: Its Origins, Development, Use and Decoration’, Architectural History, 29 (1986), 43-84.
Cross, Sophia. ‘The Country House is Just Like a Flag’, Arnold, Dana (ed.). Cultural Identities and the Aesthetics of Britishness. Manchester: Manchester University Press, 2004.
Cruikshank, D. A Guide to the Georgian Buildings of Britain and Ireland. London: Weidenfeld and Nicholson for the National Trust and the Irish Georgian Society, 1985.
Durant, David Norton. Life in the Country House: A Historical Dictionary. London: John Murray, 1996.
Dyer, Christopher and Catherine Richardson (eds). William Dugdale, Historian, 1605-1686: His Life, His Writings and His County. Woodbridge: Boydell Press, 2009.
Elliott, Brent. The Country House Garden: From the Archives of Country Life, 1897-1939. London: Mitchell Beazley, 1995.
Elton, Arthur, Brett Harrison and Keith Wark. Researching the Country House: A Guide for Local Historians. London: B.T. Batsford Ltd, 1992.
Fitzgerald, Desmond and James Peill. The Irish Country House. London: Thames & Hudson, 2010.
Fowler, Alastair. The Country House Poem: A Cabinet of Seventeenth-Century Estate Poems and Related Items. Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press, 1993.
Franklin, Jill. The Gentleman’s Country House and Its Plan, 1835-1914. London: Routledge & Kegan Paul Ltd, 1981.
Franklin, Jill. ‘The Victorian Country House’, Mingay, Gordon Edmund (ed.). The Victorian Countryside. London: Routledge & Kegan Paul, 1981.
Franklin, Jill. ‘Troops of Servants: Labour and Planning in the Country House, 1840-1914’, Victorian Studies, 19 (1975), 211-39.
Gardiner, Juliet. The Edwardian Country House. London: Channel 4 Books, 2002.
Garnett, Oliver. Country House Pastimes. London: National Trust, 1998.
Gerard, Jessica. Country House Life: Family and Servants, 1815-1914. Oxford: Blackwell Publishers, 1994.
Gerard, J. A. ‘Invisible Servants: The Country House and the Local Community’, Bulletin of the Institute of Historical Research, 57 (1984), 178-88.
Girouard, Mark. Life in the English Country House. New Haven: Yale University Press, 1978.
Girouard, Mark. Town and Country. London: Yale University Press, 1992.
Girouard, Mark. The Victorian Country House. New Haven, CT and London: Yale University Press, 1979.
Glendinning, M., R. MacInnes and A. MacKechnie. A History of Scottish Architecture from the Renaissance to the Present Day. Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press, 1996.
Goodenough, Richard. Researching the History of a Country House: A Guide to Sources and Their Use. Canterbury: Mickle Print, 2008.
Gomme, Andor and Alison Maguire. Design and Plan in the Country House: From Castle Donjons to Palladian Boxes. New Haven and London: Yale University Press, 2008.
Gow, I. The Scottish Interior. Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press, 1992.
Gow, Ian and Alistair Rowan (eds). Scottish Country Houses, 1600-1914. Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press, 1994.
Gray, Todd, Margery M. Rowe and Audrey Erskine (eds). Tudor and Stuart Devon: The Common Estate and Government. Essays Presented to Joyce Youings. Exeter: University of Exeter Press, 1992.
Hall, Michael. The English Country House: From the Archives of ‘Country Life’, 1897-1939. London: Aurum Press, 2001.
Harris, John Frederick. A Country House Index: An Index to over 2000 Country Houses Illustrated.... Shalfleet Manor Isle of Wight: Pinhorns, 1971.
Harris, John Frederick. Echoing Voices: More Memories of a Country House Snooper. London: John Murray, 2002.
Hearn, Karen. In Celebration: The Art of the Country House. London: Tate Publishing, 1998.
Herbert, Eugenia W. ‘The Gardens of Barrackpore’, Studies in the History of Gardens and Designed Landscapes, 27:1 (2007), 31-60.
Hill, N. A. ‘Nevill Holt: The Development of an English Country House’, Archaeological Journal, 156 (1999), 246-93.
Holmes, Michael. The Country House Described: An Index to the Country Houses of Great Britain and Ireland.... Winchester: St Paul’s Bibliographies, 1986.
Horn, Pamela. Ladies of the Manor: Wives and Daughters in Country House Society, 1830-1918. Stroud: Alan Sutton, 1991.
Hughes, Harold and Tom Munnelly. ‘Marty O'Malley - The Spirit of the Irish Country House’, Dal gCais, 7 (1984), 85-91.
Hughes, Helen. John Fowler: The Invention of the Country-House Style. Shaftesbury: Donhead, 2005.
Hussey, Christopher. English Country Houses: Early Georgian 1715-1760. London: Country Life, 1955.
Hussey, Christopher. English Country Houses: Mid Georgian 1760-1800. London: Country Life, 1955.
Hussey, Christopher. English Country Houses: Late Georgian 1800-1840. London: Country Life, 1955.
Jackson-Stops, Gervase, Gordon J. Schochet, Lena Cowen Orlin and Elisabeth Blair MacDowgall (eds). The Fashioning and Functioning of the British Country House. Washington, DC; National Gallery of Art; Hanover, NH; London: University Press of New England, 1989.
Jackson-Stops, Gervase. The Treasure Houses of Britain: Five Hundred Years of Private Patronage and Art Collecting. New Haven: Yale University Press, 1985.
Jenkins, D.T. Indexes of the Fire Insurance Policies of the Sun Fire Office and the Royal Exchange Assurance, 1775-87. York: Economic Social and Research Council, 1986.
Jervis, Simon Swynfen. ‘Furniture in Eighteenth-Century Country House Guides’, Furniture History, 42 (2006), 63-152.
Jervis, Simon Swynfen. ‘The English Country House Library: An Architectural History’, Library History, 18:3 (2002), 175-90.
Jones, L.J. and L.D. Schwarz. ‘Wealth, Occupation, and Insurance in the Late Eighteenth Century: The Policy Registers of the Sun Fire Office’, Economic History Review, 2nd ser., 36 (1983), 365-73.
Jordan, E. T. ‘Inigo Jones and the Architecture of Poetry’, Renaissance Quarterly, 44 (1991), 280-319.
Kenworthy-Browne, J., Peter Reid and Mark Bence-Jones. Burke’s Guide to Country Houses. London: Burke’s Peerage, 1978
Larsen, Ruth. ‘The British Country House, 1939-1945’, Everyone’s War, 15 (2007), 50-55.
Lecercle, Anne. ‘Country House, Catholicity and Crypt(ic) in Twelfth Night’, Dutton, Richard; Findlay, Alison; Wilson, Richard (eds). Region, Religion and Patronage. Manchester: Manchester University Press, 2003.
Lewis, Judith. ‘When a House is Not a Home: Elite English Women and the Eighteenth-Century Country House’, Journal of British Studies, 48 (2009), 336-63.
Littlejohn, David. The Fate of the English Country House. Oxford and New York: Oxford University Press, 1997.
Lloyd, Thomas. ‘Country-House Libraries of the Eighteenth and Nineteenth Centuries’, Jones, Philip Henry; Rees, Eiluned (ed.). A Nation and Its Books: A History of the Book in Wales. Aberystwyth: National Library of Wales in association with Aberystwyth Centre for the Book, 1998.
Lowrey, John. ‘Practical Palladianism: The Scottish Country House and the Concept of the Villa in the Late Seventeenth Century’, Architectural Heritage, 18:1 (2007), 151-67.
Lummis, Trevor, Jan Marsh. The Woman's Domain: Women and the English Country House. London: Viking, 1990.
Mackley, Alan. ‘The Documentary Evidence for Country House Building during the Eighteenth and Nineteenth Centuries’, Margeson, Sue (ed.). A Festival of Norfolk Archaeology: In Celebration of the 150th Anniversary of the Norfolk and Norwich Archaeological Society. Norwich: Norfolk and Norwich Archaeological Society, 1996.
Mandler, Peter. The Fall and Rise of the Stately Home. London: Yale University Press, 1997.
Mandler, Peter. ‘Nationalising the Country House’, Hunter, Michael Cyril William (ed.), Preserving the Past: The Rise of Heritage in Modern Britain. Stroud: Sutton, 1996.
Martin, Joanna. Wives and Daughters: Women and Children in the Georgian Country House. London: Hambledon, 2004.
Martin Robinson, John. The English Country Estate. London: Century in association with the National Trust, 1988.
McBride, Kari Boyd. Country House Discourse in Early Modern England: A Cultural Study of Landscape and Legitimacy. Aldershot: Ashgate, 2001.
McKean, Christopher. The Scottish Château: The Country House of Renaissance Scotland. Stroud: Sutton, 2002.
Mowl, Timothy and Brian Earnshaw. Trumpet at a Distant Gate: The Lodge as Prelude to the Country House. London: Waterstone, 1985.
Opitz, Donald L. ‘“This House is a Temple of Research”: Country-House Centres for Late Victorian Science’, Clifford, David (ed.). Repositioning Victorian Sciences: Shifting Centres in Nineteenth-Century Scientific Thinking. London and New York: Anthem Press, 2006, 235-259.
Palmer, Marilyn. ‘The Country House: Technology and Society’, Industrial Archaeology Review, 27:1 (2005), 97-103.
Pearson, Jacqueline. ‘"An Emblem of Themselves, in Plum or Pear": Poetry the Female Body and the Country House’, in Smith, Barbara; Appelt, Ursula (eds). Write or be Written: Early Modern Women Poets and Cultural Constraints. Aldershot: Ashgate, 2001, 87-104.
Port, M.H. ‘West End Palaces: The Aristocratic Town House in London, 1730-1830’, London Journal, 20, 1 (1995), 17-46.
Purcell, Mark. ‘The Country House Library Reassess’d: Or, Did the “Country House Library” Ever Really Exist?’, Library History, 18:3 (2002), 157-74.
Rackham, Oliver. ‘Pre-existing Trees and Woods in Country-House Parks’, Landscapes, 5:2 (2004), 1-16.
Reid, Peter H. ‘The Decline and Fall of the British Country House Library’, Libraries and Culture, 36:2 (2001), 345-66.
Retford, Kate. ‘Patrilineal Portraiture? Gender and Genealogy in the Eighteenth-Century English Country House’, Styles, John; Vickery, Amanda (eds). Gender, Taste and Material Culture in Britain and North America, 1700-1830. New Haven, CT and London: The Yale Center for British Art and The Paul Mellon Centre for Studies in British Art, 2006.
Ricketts, Annabel Ophelia Clare and Simon Ricketts. The English Country House Chapel: Building a Protestant Tradition. Reading: Spire Books, 2007.
Roberts, Judith and Martin Hargreaves. ‘Stephen Switzer, Hydrosticks and Technology in the Country House Landscape’, Transactions of the Newcomen Society, 73:2 (2003), 163-78.
Sambrook, Pamela A. Keeping Their Place: Domestic Service in the Country House, 1700-1920. Stroud: Sutton Publishing, 2005.
Sambrook, Pamela A. Country House Brewing in England, 1500-1900. London: Hambledon, 1996.
Sambrook, Pamela A. The Country House Kitchen 1650-1900: Skills and Equipment for Food Provisioning. Stroud: Alan Sutton in association with the National Trust, 1996.
Saumarez Smith, Charles. ‘Supply and Demand in English Country House Building 1660-1740’, Oxford Art Journal, 11, 2 (1988), 3-9.
Seebohm, Caroline. The Country House: A Wartime History, 1939-1945. London: Weidenfeld and Nicolson, 1989.
Sebba, Anne. The Exiled Collector: William Bankes and the Making of an English Country House. London: John Murray, 2004.
Skelton, Kimberley. ‘Redefining Hospitality: The Leisured World of the 1650s English Country House’, Journal of the Society of Architectural Historians, 68:4 (2009), 496-513.
Somerville-Large, Peter. The Irish Country House: A Social History. London: Sinclair-Stevenson, 1995.
Stewart, R. The Classic English Town House. London: New Holland, 2006.
Strong, Roy, M. Binney and J. Harris. The Destruction of the Country House. London: Thames and Hudson, 1974.
Summerson, John. ‘The Classical Country House in Eighteenth Century England’, Journal of the Royal Society of Arts, 107 (1959), 539-87.
Sykes, Christopher Simon. The Big House: The Story of Country House and its Family. London: HarperCollins, 2004.
Thompson, M. W. ‘Keep or Country House? Thin-walled Norman “Proto-Keeps”’, Fortress: The Castles & Fortifications Quarterly, 12 (1992), 13-22.
Tinniswood, Adrian. A History of Country House Visiting: Five Centuries of Tourism and Taste. Oxford: Basil Blackwell, 1989.
Tinniswood, Adrian. A Polite Tourist: A History of Country House Visiting. London: National Trust Enterprises, 1998.
Toynbee, P. ‘Horace Walpole’s Journals of Visits to Country Seats Etc.’, Walpole Society, 16 (1927-28).
Wall, C. ‘The English Auction: Narratives of Dismantlings’, Eighteenth-Century Studies, 31 (1997), 1-25.
Wall, Cynthia. The Prose of Things: Transformations of Description in the Eighteenth Century. Chicago and London: Chicago University Press, 2006.
Watkin, David. The Classical Country House: From the Archives of Country Life. London: Aurum, 2010.
West, Susie. ‘Social Space and the English Country House’, Tarlow, Sarah; West, Susie (eds). The Familiar Past? Archaeologies of Later Historical Britain. London and New York: Routledge, 1999.
Whyte, William. ‘How Do Buildings Mean? Some Issues of Interpretation in the History of Architecture’, History and Theory, 45 (2006), 153-177.
Wilson, C. Anne. The Country House Kitchen Garden, 1600-1950: How Produce Was Grown and How It Was Used. Stroud: Sutton in association with the National Trust, 1998.
Wilson, M. I. The English Country House and Its Furnishings. London: Batsford, 1977.
Wilson, Richard. ‘Novelty and Amusement?: Visiting the Georgian Country House’, The Historian, 70 (2001), 4-9.
Wilson, Richard and Alan Mackley. Creating Paradise: The Building of the English Country House, 1660-1880. London: Hambledon and London, 2001.
Wilson, Richard and Alan Mackley. ‘How Much Did the English Country House Cost to Build, 1660-1880?’, Economic History Review, 52, 3 (1999), 436-468.
Williamson, Tom. ‘Politeness and Palladianism: Archaeology and the Country House’, Margeson, Sue (ed.). A Festival of Norfolk Archaeology: in Celebration of the 150th Anniversary of the Norfolk and Norwich Archaeological Society. Norwich: Norfolk and Norwich Archaeological Society, 1996.
Worsley, Giles. ‘Beyond the Powerhouse: Understanding the Country House in the Twenty-First Century’, Historical Research, 78 (2005), 423-435.
Worsley, Lucy. ‘Female Architectural Patronage in the Eighteenth Century and the Case of Henrietta Cavendish Holles Harley’, Architectural History, 48 (2005), 139-162.

Country House: Specific Counties and Cities
Baggs, Tony. ‘The Hearth Tax and the Country House in “Old” Cambridgeshire’, Proceedings of the Cambridge Antiquarian Society, 93 (2004), 151-8.
Billington, J. ‘London's Royal Country House’, Illustrated London News, 280:7108 (1992), 38-45.
Brears, Peter Charles David. ‘York and the Gentry: the York Season and the Country House’, White, Eileen (ed.). Feeding a City: York: The Provision of Food from Roman Times to the Beginning of the Twentieth Century. Totnes: Prospect Books, 2000.
Bryant, Julius J. V. London's Country House Collections. London: Scala, with English Heritage, 1993.
de Figueiredo, P. and J. Treuherz. Cheshire Country Houses. Chichester: Phillimore & Co Ltd, 1988.
Hereward, J. and R. Taylor. The Country Houses of Northamptonshire. Swindon: Royal Commission on the Historical Monuments of England, 1996.
Kingsley, N. The Country Houses of Gloucestershire: II, 1660-1830. Chichester: Phillimore & Co Ltd, 1992.
Larsen, Ruth M. (ed.). Maids and Mistresses: Celebrating Three Hundred Years of Women and the Yorkshire Country House. Castle Howard: The Yorkshire Country House Partnership, 2004.
Lowery, Phoebe. ‘Patronage and the Country House in Northumberland’. Faulkner, Tom E. (ed.). Northumbrian Panorama: Studies in the History and Culture of North East England. London: Octavian, 1996.
Millar, A.H. Historical and Descriptive Accounts of the Castles and Mansions of Ayrshire. Edinburgh: William Paterson, 1885.
Oswald, Arthur. Country Houses of Dorset. London: Country Life, 1959.
Oswald, Arthur. Country Houses of Kent. London: Country Life Ltd, 1933.
Pinnell, Blake. Country House History Around Lymington, Brockenhurst and Milford-on-Sea. Lymington: B. Pinnell, 1987.
Ridgway, Christopher and Allen Warren. ‘The Yorkshire Country House Partnership’, Yorkshire Archaeological Journal, 81 (2009), 351-54.
Ridgway, C.L. and Allen Warren. ‘Collaborative Opportunities for the Study of the Country House: The Yorkshire Country House Partnership’, Historical Research, 78:200 (2005), 162-79.
Smith, J.T. English Houses, 1200-1800: The Hertfordshire Evidence. London: HMSO, 1992.
Smith, John Guthrie and John Oswald Michell. The Old Country Houses of the Old Glasgow Gentry. Glasgow: James Maclehose & Sons, 1878.
Stone, Lawrence and C. F. Jeanne. ‘Country Houses and Their Owners in Hertfordshire, 1540-1879’, Ayedelotte, W.O. (ed.). The Dimensions of Quantitative Research. Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1972, 56-123.
Tyack, Geoffrey. Warwickshire Country Houses. Warwick: Warwickshire Local History Society, 1989.
Tyack, Geoffrey. ‘Thomas Ward and the Warwickshire Country House’, Architectural History, 27 (1984), 534-42.
Tyack, Geoffrey. The Making of the Warwickshire Country House 1500-1650. S.l: Warwickshire Local History Society, 1982.
Wood, C. ‘Music-Making in a Yorkshire Country House’, Zon, Bennett M. (ed.). Nineteenth-Century British Music Studies, vol. 1. Aldershot: Ashgate, 1999.

Country House: Specific House Histories
Ainsworth, Stewart. ‘Howley Hall, West Yorkshire: Field Survey’, Bowden, Mark; MacKay, Donnie; Topping, Peter (eds). From Cornwall to Caithness: Some Aspects of British Field Archaeology. Papers Presented to Norman V. Quinnell. Oxford: B.A.R, 1989.
Allen, Brian. ‘Two Successful Restorations: Wilton House and Frogmore House’, Apollo: The International Magazine of the Arts, 132:345 (1990), 336-39.
Anon. Argyll: An Inventory of the Ancient Monuments. 7 vols. Edinburgh: Royal Commission on the Ancient and Historical Monuments and Constructions of Scotland, 1971-1992.
Baker, Mark. Plas Teg: A Jacobean Country House, Pontblyddyn. Cardiff: Brampton House Publishing, 2006.
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Country House: Research Reference Guides
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Pevsner, Nikolaus - The Buildings of England Series
Tipping, H. Avray. English Homes: Period 2. Vol. 1 Early Tudor, 1485-1558. London: Country Life, 1929.
Tipping, H. Avray. English Homes: Period 3. Vol. 1 Late Tudor and Early Stuart. London: Country Life, 1922.
Tipping, H. Avray. English Homes: Period 3. Vol. 2 Late Tudor and Early Stuart. London: Country Life, 1927.
Tipping, H. Avray. English Homes: Period 4. Vol. 1 Late Stuart, 1649-1714. London, Country Life, 1929.
Tipping, H. Avray. English Homes: Period 4. Vol. 2. The Work of Sir John Vanbrugh and his School, 1699-1736. London: Country Life, 1928.
Tipping, H. Avray. English Homes: Period 5. Vol. 1, Early Georgian, 1714-1760. London: Country Life, 1921.


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