Guide to align it with the Emissions Reduction Fund



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IMPORTANT INFORMATION ABOUT THIS GUIDE
The Clean Energy Regulator is updating the information in this guide to align it with the Emissions Reduction Fund.

While the information in this guide is current, and may be used to help you read and understand the method and its explanatory statement, general information about how to participate requires updating.








The Emissions Reduction Fund


The Emissions Reduction Fund is a voluntary scheme that aims to reduce Australia’s greenhouse gas emissions by providing incentives for a range of organisations and individuals to adopt new practices and technologies to reduce their emissions.

Emissions Reduction Fund projects must be conducted according to an approved method. A number of activities are eligible under the scheme and individuals and organisations taking part may be able to earn Australian carbon credit units (ACCUs). One ACCU is earned for each tonne of carbon dioxide equivalent (tCO2-e) stored or avoided by a project. ACCUs may be sold to generate additional income, either to the Government through a Carbon Abatement Contract or on the secondary market.


Why participate?


As well as contributing to Australia’s efforts to reduce the amount of greenhouse gas entering the atmosphere and the opportunity to earn ACCUs, running an Emissions Reduction Fund project may offer a range of other benefits for scheme participants.

Reducing emissions from late dry season wildfires can have direct financial benefits for landholders as well as environmental and social benefits.

Late dry season fires can have a detrimental effect on the local ecology, cultural sites and pastoral values. Late dry season fires will burn almost all the leaf litter and grass layer, exposing the soil to erosion when the first wet season rains fall. They will burn shrubs and scorch tree trunks and canopies, so will retard flowering and fruiting. Large trees may also be felled by the hottest fires.

Early dry season burning can:

protect life and property from out-of-control wildfires

maintain the productive potential of the land, for example by stimulating ‘green pick’ and controlling weeds, and

conserve biodiversity—smaller and less intense fires maintain more diverse habitats.

A savanna burning project could benefit anyone who manages tropical savannas in the north of Australia. Indigenous land managers and ranger groups, pastoralists, state governments, and other land managers and land owners can use these methods. For indigenous landholders, savanna burning involves people working on country in traditional land management activities, delivering social, cultural and environmental benefits.

Figure 1 shows how the Fish River Fire Project has reduced the area burnt in the late dry season each year from an average of 36 per cent during the baseline (unmanaged) period (2000–2009) to approximately 1 per cent in 2012.

Figure 1: Fish River Station without and with a fire management regime

image shows the fish river fire project has reduced the area burnt in the late dry season each year from an average of 36 per cent during the baseline (unmanaged) period (2000–2009) to approximately 1 per cent in 2012.

Image courtesy of the Indigenous Land Corporation

Using this guide


This guide provides an introduction to conducting a savanna burning project using the methods:

Carbon Credits (Carbon Farming Initiative) (Reduction of Greenhouse Gas Emissions through Early Dry Season Savanna Burning) Methodology Determination 2012

Carbon Credits (Carbon Farming Initiative) (Reduction of Greenhouse Gas Emissions through Early Dry Season Savanna Burning—1.1) Methodology Determination 2013.

Methods set out the rules for conducting activities under the Emissions Reduction Fund to earn ACCUs.



Remember to download a copy of the explanatory statement to read along with the savanna burning method. Explanatory statements provide further detail about each part of the method and are important documents for interpreting and understanding a method.

The guide is complementary to the Carbon Credits (Carbon Farming Initiative) Act 2011 (the Act), the associated legislative rules, approved method and explanatory statement, but does not replace them. It has been prepared by the Clean Energy Regulator, an independent Australian statutory authority responsible for administering legislation to reduce carbon emissions and increase the use of clean energy.

References to the method in this Guide, unless otherwise stated, are references to version 1.1. This is the most recent version at the time of producing this Guide.



Overview of a savanna burning project


A savanna burning abatement activity involves the application of a strategic early dry season burning regime to reduce the risk and extent of late dry season wildfires. Strategic early dry season burning involves planning for and implementing burning practices that reduce fuel loads and create more-or-less continuous burnt fire breaks in the landscape. These practices are known as patchwork burning1 or patch mosaic burning2.

Savanna wildfires can occur at any time in the dry season (March to November). However, most fires occur in the latter half of the dry season (85 per cent of the area burnt annually is burnt in this time)3.

Late dry season fires are characterised by high intensity, low levels of patchiness, a great propensity to spread and high total fuel consumption.



Controlled burning can help to reduce the risk of hot fires spreading: it reduces the extent of fires, the proportion of the landscape burnt and the frequency of any given area being burnt. This in turn helps to reduce the levels of the greenhouse gases methane (CH4) and nitrous oxide (N2O) released by fire.

Under the savanna burning methods, abatement is determined by calculating the annual emissions in the reporting period, and comparing this with average emissions during the baseline period (the 10 years prior to the year your project commences). Annual emissions in both the baseline period and the reporting period are calculated using vegetation maps and fire maps.


Late dry season savanna wildfires


Savanna woodlands cover about 25 per cent of the Australian continent, across the northern parts of Western Australia, Queensland and the Northern Territory. In these tropical regions, reliable summer rainfall drives periods of rapid plant growth, alternating with intense seasonal drought during which grasses dry rapidly. This annual cycle of rapid fuel production, followed quickly by dry windy conditions, makes the savannas extraordinarily prone to fire. More than 23 million hectares are burned annually.

Savanna woodland fires emit between two and four per cent of Australia’s annual emissions, as documented in the National Greenhouse Gas Inventory, (depending on the severity of the fire season).

On average, late dry season fires emit 52 per cent more emissions per unit area than early dry season fires4.

To conduct a savanna burning project and earn ACCUs make sure you read and understand the method and other legislative requirements. To do this you will need to:

Download Carbon Credits (Carbon Farming Initiative) (Reduction of Greenhouse Gas Emissions through Early Dry Season Savanna Burning—1.1) Methodology Determination 2013 and Explanatory Statement.

Download and understand how the Carbon Credits (Carbon Farming Initiative) Act 2011 (the CFI Act), the Carbon credits (Carbon Farming Initiative) Regulations 2011 and the Carbon Credits (Carbon Farming Initiative) Rule 2015 apply to a project.

Download and use the SavBAT abatment calculation tool.

Download and use the savanna burning 1000mm rainfall map.

Determine the start of the late dry season.

Calculate the years since the savanna was last burnt and annual emissions.

Keep records of all maps, datasets and mapping products, early strategic dry season burning activities and fuel use.

Ensure you have the legal right to conduct your project as well as the as well as the consent of anyone with a legal interest in the land (eligible interest holders).

Apply to register as a scheme participant, to open an account in the Australian National Registry of Emissions Units (ANREU) and to conduct savanna burning project.

Set up your project according to the instructions in Parts 2 and 3 of the method. Set up record keeping and monitoring systems for your project as required by Part 5 of the method.

Estimate the average annual abatement of your project, obtain an audit schedule for your project from the Clean Energy Regulator and engage a Category 2 Greenhouse and Energy Auditor early on in your project. Submit audits of your project according to your audit schedule.

Determine the amount of carbon your project stores using the calculations in Part 4 of the method. Convert the amount of carbon captured into carbon dioxide equivalents (CO2-e).

Submit your project report and application for ACCUs to the Clean Energy Regulator for assessment.

What does a savanna burning project look like?


A savanna burning project:

must be located in an area which, according to the savanna burning 1000 mm rainfall map, receives more than 1000 mm long-term average annual rainfall

must contain one or more of the following vegetation classes as described in Schedule 1 of the methods:


    1. eucalypt open forest with tussock grass ground layer

    2. eucalypt woodland, with tussock grass ground layer

    3. sandstone woodland with a mixed tussock and/or hummock (spinifex) grass ground layer, and

    4. sandstone heath with a ground layer dominated by hummock grasses (spinifex)

must apply strategic early dry season fire management in the project area

must not use other indirect methods for reducing the fire area, such as the introduction of cattle to a project area, and

must not reduce the fire area within the project area by inducing an increase in late dry season fires in area/s bordering the project area.

Setting up and running a savanna burning project


How a savanna burning project is set up and run is critical for calculating how much carbon is stored as a result of a project, which in turn determines the amount of abatement that has occurred and how many ACCUs may be issued for a project. The method and explanatory statement describe in detail how to set up a project, how to calculate the volume of emissions avoided as well as the net abatement that has occurred.

The methods are applicable only in areas that receive more than 1000 mm of long-term average rainfall (see Figure 2).


Figure 2: Rainfall map

map of australia showing tropical savanna with the 1000mm rainfall band and rainfall line.

Sourced from the Department of the Environment

Setting up and running a savanna burning project can be divided into the following parts. In each part below, the relevant sections of the method and explanatory statement are referred to, which explain the project in more detail.


Define project periods

Project period / Reporting period


The project period is the date the project starts to when the project is completed. A reporting period is one or more whole calendar years for which abatement is calculated and a report submitted.
Legal right on Aboriginal land in the Northern Territory

Land Trusts established under the Aboriginal Land Rights (Northern Territory) Act 1976 (ALR Act) hold land title in the Northern Territory and as such, have all the rights of the owner of the land. These rights must be exercised for the benefit of the traditional owners concerned and in accordance with the directions of the Land Council for the area in which the land is situated.

As the owner of the land, the Land Trust is also able to permit others to use the land, including granting an estate or interest in the land that allows a person exclusive possession of the land, such as a leasehold. Thus a person who acts with the authority of the Land Trust to conduct a project would also have a legal right to carry out that project on the land. A leaseholder with a right to exclusive possession of the land would also generally have the right to conduct an Emissions Reduction Fund sequestration project and to authorise or license others to do so.

Accordingly, applicants for proposed Emissions Reduction Fundemissions avoidance projects in the Northern Territory on land subject to the ALR Act are encouraged to provide evidence to the Clean Energy Regulator that in undertaking the emissions avoidance project they are doing so as the agent of, with the permission of, or under licence from, the relevant Land Trust or leaseholder.

Evidence of the legal right to carry out an Emissions Reduction Fund emissions avoidance project could be:

the result of a title search

correspondence confirming the applicant is acting with the authority of or permission of the relevant Land Trust or interest holder, or

evidence of the resolution of the Land Council to undertake an emissions avoidance project on that area of land.




Baseline period


The baseline represents what would happen in the absence of the project. Measuring abatement against a baseline ensures that only abatement beyond what would have occurred anyway can be credited under the Carbon Farming Initiative.

The baseline for a savanna burning project is based on the estimated average annual emissions of methane (CH4) and nitrous oxide (N2O) in tonnes of CO2-e (carbon dioxide equivalent) for the project area over the ten years immediately preceding the start of the project. Figure 3 is an illustration of the baseline concept.

Where strategic fire management has been implemented within the project area for a period of at least one year, but no more than six years immediately prior to a project starting, the baseline emissions can be estimated as the 10 years preceding the period prior to the start of strategic fire management.

Note: SavBAT does not allow for baselines that start before the year 2000.

Figure 3: Illustration of the concept of baseline in a Savanna Burning project

image depicts the savanna burning baseline concept as described above.

Fuel estimation period


The fuel estimation period is defined as the period between one and five years prior to the start of the baseline period, ie the years minus 15 to minus 11 prior to the project’s commencement.

Note: SavBAT automates this process.
Using the Savanna Burning Abatement Tool (SavBAT)

Projects using version 1.1 of the method and for which the baseline starts from or after the year 2000 will have the option of using the SavBAT. This tool automates some of the geographic information systems operations and calculations required to estimate greenhouse gas abatement. Projects using the original (2012) version of the method cannot use SavBAT and will need to perform these operations and calculations using geographic information systems software and spreadsheets.

SavBAT is available on the North Australian Fire Information Service (NAFI) website.

To undertake the GIS operations, SavBAT will access monthly fire maps developed and maintained on the NAFI website. The data accessed is compliant with the requirements of the method for monthly fire maps and seasonal fire maps.

SavBAT performs the following operations:

verifies that the project complies with the long- term average annual rainfall requirements of the method

calculates the years since last burnt (YSLB) values for each pixel in a project area

calculates the fire scar area (A) in the early dry season and the late dry season periods for each vegetation class

accepts pre-prepared data for fuel use

populates all tables of the forms required for reporting and record keeping

creates many of the maps required






SavBAT does not perform these operations:

provide mapping functionality that permits the user to create the vegetation maps required by the method

permit the use of fire seasonal maps not sourced from NAFI

allow for baselines that start before the year 2000

require (or allow) users to create accounts or log in

provide a permanent document management or record management system for the files created by users

link to the National Greenhouse and Energy Reporting (NGER) legislation

include in the outputs, copies of the spatial datasets used in the calculation or their associated metadata. These datasets are not included in the output provided by SavBAT but are available for free download, pre-prepared and zipped, from the NAFI website.


Develop vegetation maps


All maps must be in raster format (not vector). Raster maps are a type of geographic information systems map where each pixel is allocated a specific value.

A pixel is a single point in a raster map.

Fire maps sourced from NAFI (used by the SavBAT tool) are in raster format.

Identify and map project area


Vegetation maps are used to identify the different vegetation classes (see Box 1) within a project area. This is required to calculate abatement accurately as different vegetation classes generate different levels of emissions when they are burnt.

To develop a map, you must assemble available mapping products for vegetation structure and other appropriate ancillary land-attribute information (for example soil type, foliage cover) for the defined project area.

The map must delineate the project area into the four vegetation classes described in Box 1 at a maximum scale of 1:100,000 with a vegetation class assigned to each pixel that represents a part of the project area.

One of the inputs to the vegetation map must be cloud-free satellite imagery with a minimum pixel size of 250 m2 validated within the three years immediately preceding the project starting.

If not already available digitally, all vegetation mapping sources will need to be converted into digital form appropriate for geographic information systems assessment.

If the SavBAT tool is to be used for abatement calculations, the vegetation map must be prepared in raster format and in accordance with the specifications outlined in Table 1.



Note: SavBAT does not have the functionality to develop the vegetation map.
Box 1: Vegetation classes

Vegetation classes covered by the savanna burning methods:

eucalypt open forest with tussock grass ground layer

eucalypt woodland with tussock grass ground layer

sandstone woodland with a mixed tussock and/or hummock (spinifex) grass ground layer

sandstone heath with a ground layer dominated by hummock grasses (spinifex).

These vegetation classes are described in more detail in the methods.




Table 1: Format for vegetation map supported by SavBAT



Image format

8-bit palette GeoTIFF

Geo-referencing information

Embedded in GeoTIFF tags

Image file extension

.TIF (not TIFF)

Projection

GDA_1994_Albers (EPSG:3577)

Upload format

Single TIF file (No ancillary files required or allowed)

Grid size (resolution)

250 m x 250 m

Pixel values

Pixels must have the following values to depict the relevant vegetation class:

0: Pixel is within the project area but contains a non-supported vegetation class

1: eucalypt open forest with tussock grass ground layer

2: eucalypt woodland, with tussock grass ground layer

3: sandstone woodland with a mixed tussock and/or hummock (spinifex) grass ground layer

4: sandstone heath with a ground layer dominated by hummock grasses (spinifex).

255: NODATA (ie pixel is outside the project area)

Validate vegetation maps


A validated vegetation map of the project area is a required input to the SavBAT mapping tool and must be sourced/developed by the project proponent as a one-off exercise.

The vegetation map must be validated through comprehensive ground- and/or aerial-based stratified random sampling using the method described below.

For projects over 10,000 km2, you must collect at least 500 independent data waypoints using a GPS to refine the vegetation map, and a further 500 independent data waypoints to separately assess the accuracy of the vegetation map.

For projects under 10,000 km2, you must collect 250 independent data waypoints for each purpose.

Independent data waypoints must be one hectare in area to be congruent with the scale of the vegetation map. This data must be collected with reference to transects or a grid that samples all vegetation classes over the project area.

Validation must be assessed using geographic information systems software, by intersecting the independent data waypoints with the vegetation map for the purposes of delivering a standard error matrix. The standard error matrix will include errors of omission and commission. Data in the standard error matrix must be used to determine the accuracy of the map as a percentage.

The data collected in this step should be used to improve the accuracy of the vegetation map developed. The final vegetation map must be assessed as at least 80 per cent accurate overall at 1:100,000 scale to be acceptable for emissions accounting purposes.

Calculate the area of each vegetation class


Using the vegetation map described above, apply geographic information systems software to calculate the area of each vegetation class in terms of the number of pixels.

Note: SavBAT automates this process.

Source or develop fire maps


Fire maps can be obtained from NAFI. All fire maps sourced from NAFI meet the specifications of the methods.

All fire maps must be in raster format.

Fire maps used to calculate baseline emissions of a project area must have a spatial resolution of one square kilometre per pixel or finer.

Fire maps used to calculate project emissions for a project area must have a spatial resolution of 250 square metres per pixel or finer.



Note: If you use SavBAT you will need to keep output copies of the spatial datasets used by SavBAT along with their associated metadata. These datasets are not included in the output provided by SavBAT, but are available for free download, pre-prepared and zipped, from the NAFI website.

Non-NAFI fire maps


If you do not source your fire maps from NAFI you:

will need to provide evidence of the source of the maps in your reporting. Non-NAFI maps will also need to be validated by a registered greenhouse and energy auditor in a written report (see Part 3 Division 3.3 of the method)

will not be able to use the SavBAT tool.

Note: SavBAT automatically uploads seasonal fire maps from NAFI.

Vegetation maps must be developed using Geographic Information Systems software and can be sourced free from Northern Australia Fire Information service; seasonal and monthly fire maps not sourced from the Northern Australia Fire Information service (through SavBAT) must be validated for accuracy by a registered greenhouse and energy auditor.

Develop monthly fire maps


A monthly fire map used in relation to a baseline period, a reporting period or a fuel load estimation period must adopt a consistent time series and be derived from a single satellite imagery product.

A single geographic information systems map may be used to meet the requirements for monthly maps. The time series used to calculate the baseline period emissions and reporting period emissions do not have to be consistent with each other (ie from a single satellite product). Gaps in the availability of satellite imagery may be filled by supplementing fine scale products with coarser scale products.



Note: SavBAT automates this process using NAFI data.

Develop seasonal fire maps


These maps must be in raster format and show burnt and unburnt pixels in each month. Burnt pixels represent a fire scar. The sum of all burnt pixels represents the fire scar area.

Monthly fire maps for each month from 1 January to 30 August must be combined to develop a seasonal fire map for the early dry season.

Monthly fire maps for each month from 31 August to 31 December must be combined to develop a seasonal fire map for the late dry season.

A seasonal fire map used in relation to a baseline period, a reporting period or a fuel load estimation period must adopt a consistent time series, be derived from a single satellite imagery product, and be based on a time resolution of one month or less.

The time series used to calculate the baseline period emissions and reporting period emissions do not have to be consistent with each other. Gaps in the availability of satellite imagery may be filled by supplementing fine scale products with coarser scale products.

Consistency means the maps are from a single satellite product.



The requirements for seasonal fire maps not sourced from NAFI are outlined above and in the method in Part 3 Division 3.3.

Note: SavBAT automates this process using NAFI data.

Determine the start of the late dry season and conduct a regime of early dry season burning


The methods allow for the government to specify start dates by region for the late dry season for each year of the reporting and baseline periods. Currently this functionality is not used and the date for the start of the late dry season is fixed at 31 August.
There are a number of ways to undertake strategic early dry season burning, including igniting fires from aircraft, from vehicles along the sides of roads and tracks, from boats on waterways, or by walking across country. The specific location, timing and method of prescribed burning will depend on environmental, cultural and infrastructure features within the project areas, and local weather conditions.
The specific approach to strategic early dry season burning is not prescribed in the method. For more information see the NAFI website.

Calculate the baseline

Calculate the fire scar area in the early dry season and late dry season for each vegetation class


The fire scar area of a project means the spatial extent within a project area that has been affected by fire. The fire scar area in hectares must be calculated for each year in the baseline period and for each year in the reporting period. The fire scar must be calculated for each vegetation class and fire season.

Note: SavBat automates this process using NAFI data.

Determine the fire scar area in raster format


Using geographic information system software, overlay the project’s vegetation map with seasonal fire maps. This process produces a raster map that allocates a vegetation class and a fire season value to each burnt pixel that is part of the fire scar.

Note: SavBat automates this process using NAFI data.

Convert these values into area (hectares)


Using geographic information system software, convert the burnt pixel values in the raster map into hectares. Record the results in Table 10 of Form 1 of Schedule 2 of the method.

Note: SavBat automates this process.

Calculate abatement

Identify your greenhouse gas assessment boundary


The method specifies what emissions sources need to be taken into account when calculating abatement. They are outlined in Table 2.

There is no requirement for you to measure and/or record living and dead vegetation in the project area at any time. The methodology provides values for these fuels based on vegetation type and years since last burnt. There is, however, a requirement to record and report on fuel used to establish and maintain the project.



Note: SavBAT automates the process of assigning fuel class load to each pixel in the project area.



Calculate annual fire emissions


The annual emissions of greenhouse gases in tonnes of CO2-e from fire for a project must be calculated for each calendar year of the baseline period and the reporting period using Equation 1 in the method.

Note: SavBat automates this process.
Table 2: Greenhouse gas assessment boundary—gases accounted for in abatement calculations




Source

Greenhouse gas/carbon pools

Baseline

Burning of flammable living and dead vegetation (fine, coarse and heavy fuels, and shrubs)

Methane (CH4)

Nitrous oxide (N2O)



Project activity

Burning of flammable living and dead vegetation (fine, coarse and heavy fuels, and shrubs)

Methane (CH4)

Nitrous oxide (N2O)



Project activity

Fuel use, for example from helicopters and other motor- driven equipment or drip torches

Methane (CH4)

Nitrous oxide (N2O)

Carbon Dioxide (CO2)


Fine fuel: grass, leaf litter, bark and small twigs less than 6 mm in diameter

Coarse fuel: twigs and dead branches greater than or equal to 6mm and less than or equal to 59 mm in diameter

Heavy fuel: branches and logs of greater than 50 mm in diameter

Shrubs: living plants with a stem diameter of less than 50 mm at a height of 1.3 m

Record fuel used to establish and manage a project


The total emissions of greenhouse gases from fuel used to establish and manage a project must be calculated for each fuel type and each greenhouse gas (ie CO2, N2O and CH4) so they can be added to total emissions from fire to determine total annual project emissions. Emissions from all equipment used to conduct the project (for example helicopters, fire buggies, torches) must be recorded.

SavBAT cannot perform the calculations required to determine emissions from conducting the project. These must be calculated manually using Equations 6 and 7 in version 1.1 of the method. (See box 2 for example applications).

The equations require you to multiply your fuel use for each type of fuel by a particular emissions factor for each greenhouse gas. The equations are outlined in Schedule 1 of the National Greenhouse and Energy Reporting (Measurement) Determination. These figures are then summed and entered into SavBAT as inputs to calculate total project emissions. If you are not using SavBAT you will record these figures in Table 26 of Schedule 2 of the methods.

Examples of fuel types (for transport energy purposes) and their emissions factors for each greenhouse gas are in Table 3.


Table 3: Energy and emissions factors—indicative examples

Fuel type

Energy content factor

Emissions factor







-

-

CO2

CH4

N2O

Gasoline (for use in an aircraft)

34.2

66.3

0.04

0.7

LPG

26.2

59.6

0.6

0.6

Diesel oil

38.6

69.2

0.2

0.5

The emissions associated with the combustion of fuel—for example from aircraft or ground vehicles used to conduct strategic fire management or field data collection, or fuel used in drip torches—must be included in the annual project emissions.
Box 2: Example application of Equations 6 and 7—Calculation of tCO2-e for fuel use

Ranger Joe’s landcruiser uses 12 litres of diesel per 100 km.

He keeps a log book of kilometres travelled for his project activities. He tallies these up on a monthly basis during the early dry season when he is involved in conducting burns. In one particular month he travelled 462 km.
Firstly, he determines the number of litres of fuel used:
462 km x 12 litres/100 = 55.44 litres.

Secondly, he converts the number of litres of fuel to m3, by dividing by 1000: 55.44 litres/1000 = 0.05544

Thirdly, to determine the emissions (in tCO2-e) from diesel used, he multiplies the energy content factor for diesel oil (38.6) by the quantity of fuel used in cubic metres (0.05544) by the emissions factor for each of the following three greenhouse gasses: CO2 (69.2), CH4 (0.2) and N2O (0.5). This number is then divided by 1000 to deliver a result in tCO2-e.

For CO2 = 38.6 x 0.055440 x 69.2

= 148.08/1000

= 0.1480868 tCO2-e

For CH4 = 38.6 x 0.055440 x 0.2

= 0.43/1000

= 0.0004279 tCO2-e

For N2O = 38.6 x 0.055440 x 0.5

= 1.07/1000

= 0.0010699 tCO2-e

Equation 7


For Equation 7 the emissions determined in Equation 6 need to be summed:

Emissions from diesel in CO2 = 0.1480868 tCO2-e

Emissions from diesel in CH4 = 0.0004279 tCO2-e

Emissions from diesel in N2O = 0.0010699 tCO2-e



TOTAL emissions from diesel use = 0.1495846 tCO2-e

Calculate net annual greenhouse gas abatement

Determine total annual project emissions


Annual project emissions are calculated by summing annual emissions from fire and emissions from fuel use (both in tonnes CO2-e).

Note: SavBat automates this process.

Determine net annual project abatement


Net annual project abatement is calculated by subtracting the project emissions for the project year from the average baseline emissions.

Note: SavBat automates this process.

Note: when calculating project abatement across multiple years you must also include any negative abatement. There is no provision in the methodologies to exclude or ‘zero out’ project emissions where they are greater than the project baseline in one or more years.

Monitoring and record keeping


The Clean Energy Regulator recommends you draw up a plan for the monitoring, data collecting and record keeping required for a project report as specified in the method. The means of collecting and recording data will need to be in place from the start of the project. Should a project report and associated audit show that data collecting and record keeping has not been in place for the entire reporting period, ACCUs may not be issued for some or all of that reporting period.

When developing your plan, make sure you have the right controls and processes around your data. Are you collecting your data efficiently? Will you be able to maintain your data in the event of an emergency such as a fire?


Project and audit reports


You need to report on your project to the Clean Energy Regulator. Audits are required where indicated in your project’s audit schedule, which the Clean Energy will provide following registration of your project.

For savanna burning projects, reports must be made between one and two years. The first reporting period begins at the start of the project’s crediting period.

The method lists the information that must be included in your project reports. Applications for ACCUs can be made at the same time as you submit your project and audit reports. Full reporting, record keeping and monitoring requirements are set out in regulations and rules made under the Act. You should familiarise yourself with these requirements.

The Clean Energy Regulator will not issue Australian carbon credit units automatically on receipt of a project report.

Emissions Reduction Fund projects are able to generate credits throughout their crediting period. Crediting periods for each type of project are set out in Part 5 of the CFI Act. The crediting period for a savanna burning project is 25 years.

The role of audit


Audits assess whether a project complies with the project registration, the relevant method and legislative requirements. Audit reports must be prepared by a registered category 2 greenhouse and energy auditor; a list of auditors is available on the Clean Energy Regulator website under National Greenhouse and Energy Reporting.

The Clean Energy Regulator recommends you engage your auditor early when developing your project to ensure the project is auditable and to assist the auditor to plan activities throughout the reporting and post-reporting periods. The costs of any audit are your responsibility or the responsibility of your organisation. You must make available to the auditor all necessary documents and information, including data records, receipts and other supporting documentation, and calculation spread sheets.


Making changes to a project


You must notify the Clean Energy Regulator of any changes to your or your project’s circumstances or operations that may affect project ownership, the project’s eligibility or the amount of abatement reported and the number of ACCUs claimed. A project owner must seek approval from the Clean Energy Regulator if they intend to make a significant change from the project as outlined in the application.

Resources


  • For more information on participating in the ERF - www.cleanenergyregulator.gov.au

  • For more information regarding method development – www.environment.gov.au

  • www.legislation.gov.au is the site where you can find all legislative instruments including the:

    1. Carbon credits (Carbon Farming Initiative) Act 2011 (current version)

    2. Carbon credits (Carbon Farming Initiative) Regulations 2011

    3. Carbon Credits (Carbon Farming Initiative) Rule 2015

    4. Carbon Farming (Reduction of Greenhouse Gas Emissions through Early Dry Season Savanna Burning) Methodology Determination 2012

    5. Explanatory statement

    6. Carbon Credits (Carbon Farming Initiative) (Reduction of Greenhouse Gas Emissions through Early Dry Season Savanna Burning—1.1) Methodology Determination 2013

    7. Explanatory Statement

  • Enquiries on participating in the ERF - 1300 553 542; enquiries@cleanenergyregulator.gov.au

National Greenhouse Accounts Factors

Schedule 1 of the NGER (Measurement) Determination


References


R. Garnaut. The Garnaut Review: Australia in the Global Response to Climate Change. Cambridge University Press, 2011.

J.T. Houghton, G.J. Jenkins and J.J. Ephraums (eds). Climate Change: The IPCC Scientific Assessment (1990). Report prepared for Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change by Working Group I. Cambridge University Press.

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1 Russell-Smith et al 2009

2 C.L. Parr, A.N. Andersen. Patch mosaic burning for biodiversity conservation: a critique of the pyrodiversity paradigm. Conserv Biol, 2006

3 R. Garnaut. The Garnaut Review: Australia in the Global Response to Climate Change. Cambridge University Press, 2011

4 J. Russell-Smith, P. Whitehead and P. Cooke. Culture, Ecology and Economy of Fire Management in North Australian Savannas—Rekindling the Wurrk Tradition. CSIRO Publishing, 2009

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