Graduate Institute of Political Economy National Cheng Kung University



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Instructor: 周志杰

SEMINAR IN RESEARCH METHODS

Graduate Institute of Political Economy

National Cheng Kung University



Instructor:

周志杰

Office:

27208

Semester:

Fall 2009

Office Hours:

Tu 1130-1200, 1800-1830


Class Time:

Tue. 12:10-15:00

Office Phone:

2757575 ext.50231

Classroom:

27603


E-Mail:

ccchou@mail.ncku.edu.tw

Course Description and Objectives

This seminar is designed to improve graduate-level skills in creating and criticizing methodologically sophisticated research work. You are supposed to gain better competence to 1) refresh your knowledge towards the evolution of social scientific methodology and main approaches and theories in the discipline, 2) enhance your skills to interpret qualitative evidence and empirical data of political economical life, 4) critically evaluate theoretical framework, research techniques, and main research themes, and 5) proceed research design by adopting theories and techniques in social sciences, The research examples used to illustrate methodological issues will be mainly drawn from political science. However, the methodological content of the seminar is applicable to the study of economics, sociology, and area studies.


Required Textbook

1. King, Gary, Robert Keohane, and Sidney Verba. Designing Social Inquiry:



Scientific Inference in Qualitative Research. N.J.: Princeton University. Press, 1994.

2. Assigned Journal Articles.

i) All readings can be found on 成大電子期刊 (NCKU E-Journal) - JSTOR - Arts & Sciences I Collection

http://140.116.210.3/cgi-bin/ej/browse.cgi?q=iJSTOR+-+Arts+%26+Sciences+I+Collection.pub&ccd=mudO_x&sentry=1&o=select

ii) Some readings you might find on this course’s webpage (go onto http://iteach.ncku.edu.tw/, find the title of this course, then log in. Please also register in one of the students in this course, all lecture notes and information will be posted on the webpage.)


Suggested Textbooks (for refreshing knowledge you’ve got)

1. 吳翠松 譯 (Mark J. Smith著)。「社會科學概說:方法論的探索」。台北:韋

伯文化,2004。

2. 冷則剛、任文姍 譯 (Jarol B. Manheim and Richard C. Rich著) 「政治學方法

論」。台北:五南圖書出版公司,1998。

3. 易君博。「政治理論與研究方法」。台北:三民書局,1990。

4. 志杰 譯 (Todd Landman著)。「最新比較政治的議題與途徑」。台北:韋伯

文化國際出版有限公司,2006。

5. Flyvbjerg, Bent. Making Social Science Matter: Why Social Inquiry Fails and How It Can Succeed Again. Steven Sampson, trans. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2001.

6. Chilcote, Ronald H. Theories of Comparative Politics: the Search for a Paradigm



Reconsidered. (2nd edition) Boulder: Westview Press, 1994.

Useful Websites

1. The Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research (ICPSR)



http://www.icpsr.umich.edu/

2. Resources for Methods in Evaluation and Social Research



http://gsociology.icaap.org/methods/

3. Social Scientist’s Guide to Free Statistical Software and Resources


http://data.fas.harvard.edu/micah_altman/socsci.shtml

4. Political Methodology, American Political Science Association



http://polmeth.wustl.edu/

5. Committee on Concept and Method, International Political Science Association



http://www.concepts-methods.org/

6. Comparative and Research Method, American Political Science Association



http://www.nd.edu/~apsacp/

Course Requirements and Grading Policy
1. Weights: Three Leading Discussion 30% (10% for each), One Research Design Written Assignments & Oral Presentation 50%, Participation/Contribution 20%.

2. Three Leading Discussion of the assigned readings (Seminar Leader and Written Critique)

1) You will be assigned to lead three seminars in this course. Principally, some students will be selected as leaders in one session. Each leader focuses on one reading required for the given week, and leads the rest of participants to summarize and comment the reading and answer relevant questions raised by participants and I.

2) Each leader will be required to write one 3000 word critique of that assigned reading, and submit it at the beginning of the seminar of that given week.

3) The other participants are also required to do best to address all readings for the week, and show your active participation and contribution in the readings and relevant question/theme.



3. One Research Design Paper (Draft Presentation & Revised Paper Submission)

1) Decide Your Paper Topic. Select two of the eight main research themes (Theme 1 to Theme 8, listed below) as the general direction/orientation of your research topic. One theme can be allowed five persons to take, and you cannot select the same theme for two research design papers. You have to get my permission before you decided your topic.

Theme 1: State/Institution Studies and Comparative Research

Theme 2: International Relation Theory & International Studies

Theme 3: Global Political Economy and International Economic Relations

Theme 4: Political Economy of Development

Theme 5: Political Change and Democratic Performance

Theme 6: Global Issues

Theme 7: Public Policy and Analysis of Political Economy

Theme 8: Human Security

2) Research Design Draft Presentation. You will be required to submit a copy of your research design draft to me one week in advance of presenting this design in the seminar. Each student will present their design in the seminar for 10 minutes, including: a short introduction of your research question and its significance, hypothesis/proposition, variables setting/operationalization, data source, method(s) to inference, and estimation/expectation of the result.

3) Research Design Paper Submission. You are expected to revise the paper fully after presentation, and submit it in two weeks. Research designs should address all of the following tasks elements: (1) specification of your research question and research objectives, in relation to the current stage of development and research needs of the relevant research program, related literatures, and alternative explanations; (2) specification of the hypotheses/propositions, and independent and dependent variables (or plus intervening variables); (3) selection of a theoretical approach/model/method that are appropriate in light of the first two tasks, and justification of why this framework were selected and how it can build causality and proceed inference from your research question; and (4) consideration of how variance in the variables can best be described for testing and/or refining existing theories. There is no minimum length limit, though most designs will probably be around 6,000 words and should be shorter than 9,000 words.



4. Participation in class discussions is requiredIt is a graduate-level seminar!! Discussions will be conducted under the following rules:

  • BE PREPARED. Intelligent participation requires that you have read and thought about the assignment.

  • BACK UP STATEMENTS WITH EVIDENCE. Evidence can consist of facts or statistics from the literature and/or specific observations or experiences.

  • CONTRIBUTE. Your perspective is unique. It is your responsibility to give the class the benefit of your point of view, even if you believe that others may disagree. Practice demonstrates the courage of your convictions. We may be able to discover some new ideas/puzzles in the atmosphere of the class that is full of brain-storming conversations.

Scholastic Dishonesty


Scholastic dishonesty is any act that violates the rights of another student with respect to academic work or that involves misrepresentation of a student's own work. Scholastic dishonesty includes (but is not limited to) cheating on assignments or examinations, plagiarizing (misrepresenting as one’s own anything done by another), submitting the same or substantially similar papers (or creative work) for more than one course without consent of all instructors concerned, depriving another of necessary course materials, and sabotaging another’s work.

Discussion Topics and Assigned Readings

Week 1: 09/15 Overview Syllabus & Introduction of Coming Attractions

Week 2: 09/22 Readings Distribution & How to Write Your Thesis Proposal/Research Design (Preface)
Part I – Basic Lecturing
Week 3: 09/29 How to Write Your Thesis Proposal/Research Design (Criticism)

Required readings (you have to read):

* Thesis Proposal Writing Samples (To be passed)
Week 4: 10/06 Refresh the Methodology for Social Sciences

Recommended reading (you might read):



吳翠松 譯 (Mark J. Smith著)。「社會科學概說:方法論的探索」。台北:韋

伯文化,2004。


Part II – Review Methodology: Bridge the Qualitative & Quantitative Approach
Week 5: 10/13 (Leading Discussions)

1. Review the Fundamentals of Methodology



Facts, impressions, and concepts in society.

Required:

*King, Keohane, and Verba, ch1;

*Robert O. Keohane, “Governance in a Partially Globalized World: Presidential Address, American Political Science Association, 2000,” American Political Science Review, Vol. 95, No. 1. (Mar., 2001), pp. 1-13.

*Gabriel A. Almond; Stephen J. Genco, “Clouds, Clocks, and the Study of Politics” World Politics, Vol. 29, No. 4. (July 1977), pp. 489-522.

*Stephen M. Walt, “Rigor or Rigor Mortis?  Rational Choice and Security Studies” International Security, Vol. 23, No. 4 (Spring 1999), pp. 5-48.

*Albert O. Hirschman, “The Search for Paradigms as a Hindrance to Understanding,” World Politics, Vol. 22, No. 3 (April 1970), pp. 329-343.

*John Candler Cobb, “The Significance and Use of Data in the Social Sciences,” The Economic Journal, Vol. 38, No. 149 (Mar., 1928), pp. 63-75.

Recommended:

*Sidney Tarrow, “Making Social Science Work across Space and Time: A Critical Reflection on Robert Putnam’s, Making Democracy Work,” American Political Science Review, Vol. 90, No. 2 (June 1996), pp. 389-397.

*David Easton, “An Approach to the Analysis of Political Systems,” World Politics, Vol. 9, No. 3 (Apr., 1957), pp. 383-400.

*Gabriel A. Almond, “Comparative Political Systems,” The Journal of Politics, Vol. 18, No. 3 (Aug., 1956), pp. 391-409.


2. Divergent Ideas of Social Science

   Alternative ways for social science inquiry.

Required:

(Historical Approach)

*Ian S. Lustick, “History, Historiography, and Political Science: Multiple Historical Records and the Problem of Selection Bias,” American Political Science Review, Vol. 90, No. 3 (September 1996), pp. 605-618.

*John D. Stephens, “Historical Analysis and Casual Assessment in Comparative Research.” APSA-CP Newsletter Vol. 9, No. 1 (Winter 1998), pp. 22-25.

(Critical Approach)

*Theodore J. Lowi, “The State in Political Science: How We Become What We Study,” American Political Science Review, Vol. 86, No. 1 (March, 1992), pp. 1-7.

*Christian Bay, “Politics and Pseudo-politics: A Critical Evaluation of Some Behavior Literature,” American Political Science Review, Vol. 59, No. 1 (March 1965), pp. 39-51.

(New Social Science)

*David Easton, “The New Revolution in Political Science,” American Political Science Review Vol. 63, No. 4 (December 1969), pp. 1051­-1061.

Recommended:

David J. Sylvan, “The Qualitative-Quantitative Distinction in Political Science,”

Poetics Today, Vol. 12, No. 2 (Summer, 1991), pp. 267-286.
Week 6: 10/20 (Leading Discussions)

1. Theories and Hypotheses: Descriptive Inference and Causal Inference

    What’s all this about falsification and the null hypothesis?

Required:

*King, Keohane, and Verba, ch2.

*Giovanni Sartori, “Concept Misformation in Comparative Politics,” American Political Science Review, Vol. 64, No. 4 (December 1970), pp. 1033-53.

*Morris P. Fiorina, “Formal Models of Political Science,” American Journal of Political Science, Vol. 19, No. 1 (February 1975), pp. 133-159.

*Doug Dion, “The Robustness of the Structure-Induced Equilibrium,” American Journal of Political Science, Vol. 36, No. 2 (May 1992), pp. 462-83.


*Bruce Bueno de Mesquita and David Lalman, “Domestic Opposition and Foreign War,” American Political Science Review, Vol. 84, No. 3 (September 1990), pp. 747-65.

Recommended:

*David D. Laitin, “Displining Political Science,” American Political Science Review, Vol. 89, No. 2 (Jun., 1995), pp. 454-456.

Charles Ragin, “Turning the Tables: How Case-Oriented Research Challenges Variable-Oriented Research,” Comparative Social Research Vol. 16, 1997, pp. 27-42.


2. Concept Building, Operationalization, and Measurement

   Trying to get a handle on stylized facts, factoids, and indicators.

Required:

*King, Keohane, and Verba, ch5.

*Charles O. Jones, “Doing Before Knowing: Concept Development in Political Research,” American Journal of Political Science, Vol. 18, No. 1 (February 1974), pp. 215-228.

*Arthur L. Kalleberg, “Concept Formation in Normative and Empirical Studies: Toward Reconciliation in Political Theory.” American Political Science Review. Vol. 63, No. 1 (March 1969), pp. 26-39.

*Robert Adcock and David Collier, “Measurement Validity: A Shared Standard for Qualitative and Quantitative Research.” American Political Science Review. Vol. 95, No. 3 (September 2001), pp. 529-546.

*David Collier and James E. Mahon, Jr., “Conceptual “Stretching” Revisited: Adapting Categories in Comparative Analysis,” American Political Science Review, Vol. 87, No. 4 (December, 1993), pp. 845-855.

Recommended:

*Richard F. Fenno, Jr., “U.S. House Members in Their Constituencies: An Exploration,” American Political Science Review, Vol. 71 No. 2 (March 1977), pp. 883-917.


Week 7: 10/27 (Leading Discussions)

1. Causality, Inference, and Interpretation

Every time A-Bian comes here it rains. A-Bian causes rain!

Required:

*King, Keohane, and Verba, ch 3

*Timothy J. McKeown, “Case Studies and the Statistical Worldview,” International Organization, Vol. 53, No.1 (Winter 1999), pp. 161-190.

*Herbert M. Kritzer, “The Data Puzzle: The Nature of Interpretation in Quantitative Research,” American Journal of Political Science Vol. 40, No. 1 (February 1996), pp. 1-32.

*Albert Yee, “The Causal Effects of Ideas on Policies,” International Organization Vol. 50, No. 1 (Winter 1996), pp. 69-108.

*Schoppa, Leonard. “The Social Context in Coerceive International Bargaining,” International Organization Vol. 53, No. 2 (Spring 1999), pp. 307-42.

Recommended:

*Timothy J. McKeown, “Hegemonic Stability Theory and 19th Century Tariff Levels in Europe,” International Organization Vol. 37, No. 1 (Winter 1983), pp. 73-91.

 

2. Comparison as Method and Comparative Methods



    They’re all Taiwanese, what’s the problem?

Required:

David Collier, “The Comparative Method,” in Ada Finifter, ed., Political Science: the State of the Discipline II (Washington, D.C.: American Political Science Association, 1993), pp. 105-119.

* Arend Lijphart, “Comparative Politics and the Comparative Method.” American Political Science Review Vol. 65, No.3 (September 1971), pp.682-693.

*Herbert Kitschelt, “Political Regime Change: Structure and Process-Driven Explanations?American Political Science Review, Vol. 86, No. 4 (December 1992), pp. 1028-1034.

*Lieberson, “Small N’s and Big Conclusions: an Examination of the Reasoning in Comparative Case Studies Based on a Small Number of Cases,” Social Forces Vol. 70, No. 2 (December 1991), pp. 307-320.

*James D. Fearon, “Counterfactuals and Hypothesis Testing in Political Science,” World Politics, Vol. 43, No. 2 (January 1991), pp. 169-195.

Recommended:

*Arthur L. Kalleberg, “The Logic of Comparison: A Methodological Note on the Comparative Study of Political Systems.” World Politics. 19 (October 1966): 69-82.

*Katzenstein, Peter J., “The Role of Theory in Comparative Politics: A Symposium,” World Politics,” Vol. 48, No. 1 (February 1996), pp. 1-49.



Week 8: 11/03 (Leading Discussions)

1. Case Studies and Case Selection

    How could you compare an Apple and an Orange?

Required:

*King, Keohane, and Verba, ch 4

*David Collier and James Mahoney, “Insights and Pitfalls: Selection Bias in Qualitative Research,” World Politics Vol. 49, No. 1 (October 1996), pp. 56-91.

*Richard Locke and Katheleen Thelen, “Problem of Equivalence in Comparative Politics: Apples and Oranges, Again,” APSA-CP Newsletter Vol. 9, No. 1 (Winter 1998), pp. 9-18.

*David Collier, “Translating Quantitative Methods for Qualitative Researchers: The Case of Selection Bias;” Ronald Rogowski, “The Role of Theory and Anomaly in Social-Scientific Inference;” and Sidney Tarrow, “Bridging the Quantitative-Qualitative Divide in Political Science,” American Political Science Review Vol. 89, No. 2 (June 1995), pp. 461-474.

*David Collier and Steven Levitsky, “Democracy with Adjectives: Conceptual Innovation in Comparative Research,” World Politics, Vol. 49, No. 3 (April 1997), pp. 430-451.
2. Quasi-Experimental and Survey Designs

    What do people think in Tainan City? Well I asked this cab driver and….

Required:

*King, Keohane, and Verba, Chap. 6.

Katheleen McGraw, “Political Methodology: Research Design and Experimental Methods,” in Robert E. Goodin and Hans-Dieter Klingemann (eds.) A New Handbook of Political Science, NY: Oxford University Press, pp. 769-786.

Larry M. Bartels and Henry E. Brady, “The State of Quantitative Political Methodology,” in Ada Finifter, ed., Political Science: the State of the Discipline II, Washington, D.C.: American Political Science Association, 1993), pp. 121-161.

Comment a Master’s Thesis Proposal (To be passed)

Recommended:

*Albert D. Cover and Bruce S. Brumberg, “Baby Books and Ballots: The Impact of Congressional Mail on Constituent Opinion.” American Political Science Review. Vol. 76, No. (June 1982), pp. 347-359. 
Week 9: 11/10 An Invited Speech (學者演講)
Part III – Proceed Research: Themes that Link the Politics and the Economy
1. Inter-State Level
Week 10: 11/17 Theme 1: State as an Object to Compare

(Leading Discussions + Presentations)

Required:

Ronald Rogowski, “Comparative Politics,” in Political Science: The State of the Discipline II, edited by Ada W. Finifter (ed.), Washington, DC: American Political Science Association, 1993, pp. 431-444.

Joel S. Migdal, “Studying the State,” in Comparative Politics: Rationality, Culture and Structure, edited by Mark I. Lichbach and Alan S. Zuckerman. NY: Cambridge University Press, 1997, pp. 208-233.

Barry R. Weingast, “Political Institution: Overview,” in Robert E. Goodin and Hans-Dieter Klingemann (eds.) A New Handbook of Political Science, NY: Oxford University Press, pp. 167-190.

*Gabriel Almond, “The Return to the State,” American Political Science Review, Vol. 82, No. 3 (September 1988), pp. 853-874.

*Peter Evans, “The Eclipse of the State? Reflections on Stateness in an Era of Globalization,” World Politics, Vol. 50, No. 1 (October 1997), pp. 62-87.

Recommended:

*Ronald H. Chilcote, Theories of Comparative Politics: the Search for a Paradigm

Reconsidered. (2nd edition) Boulder: Westview Press, 1994, pp. 3-6.

*Randall L. Calvert, “Lowi’s Critique of Political Science: A Response,” PS: Political Science and Politics, Vol. 26, No. 2. (Jun., 1993), pp. 196-198.

*Karen L. Remmer, “Theoretical Decay and Theoretical Development: The Resurgence of Institutional Analysis,” World Politics, Vol. 50, No. 1 (October 1997), pp. 34-61.
Week 11: 11/24 Theme 2: International Relation Theory & International Studies

(Leading Discussions + Presentations)
Required:

*Robert Jervis, “Realism, Neoliberalism, and Cooperation: Understanding the Debate,” International Security, Vol. 24, No. 1. (Summer 1999), pp. 42-63.

*Ole Waever, “The Sociology of a Not So International Discipline: American and European Developments in International Relations,” International Organization, Vol. 52, No. 4 (Autumn 1998), pp. 687-727.

*Lisa L. Martin; Beth A. Simmons, “Theories and Empirical Studies of International Institutions,” International Organization, Vol. 52, No. 4 (Autumn 1998), pp. 729-757.

*Kenneth N. Waltz, “Structural Realism after the Cold War,” International Security, Vol. 25 No. 1 (Summer 2000), pp. 5-37.

*Chih-Chieh Chou (周志杰), “State Authority vs. International Norm: Impacts of Legitimacy on Practice of International Human Rights Law,”《政大法學評論》,109期 (2009年6月) , pp. 113-176.

Recommended:

*Richard Ned Lebow and Thomas Risse-Kappen (eds.), International Relations Theory and the End of the Cold War, NY: Columbia University Press, 1996.

*Ethan B. Kapstein, “Does Unipolarity Have a Future?” (a book chapter).

Week 12: 12/01 Theme 3: International Political Economy

(Leading Discussions + Presentations)

Required:

*Torben Iverson, “Domesticating the Monster of Globalization,” APSA-CP Newsletter, Vol. 7, No. 2, p. 5; pp. 10-13.

James A. Caporaso, “Global Political Economy,” in Ada Finifter, ed., Political Science: the State of the Discipline II, Washington, D.C.: American Political Science Association, 1993), pp. 451-482.

*Peter J. Katzenstein; Robert O. Keohane; Stephen D. Krasner, “International Organization and the Study of World Politics,” International Organization, Vol. 52, No. 4 (Autumn 1998), pp. 645-685.

*Geoffrey Garrett, “Global Markets and National Politics: Collision Course or Virtuous Circle?International Organization, Vol. 52, No. 4 (Autumn 1998), pp. 787-824.

*Martha Finnemore and Kathryn Sikkink, “International Norm Dynamics and Political Change,” International Organization, Vol. 52, No. 4 (Autumn 1998), pp. 887-917.

* Chih-Chieh Chou (周志杰), “Implications of Great Power Rivalries on Regionalism in East Asia”,《中山人文社會科學期刊》,vol.15, no.1. (June 2007), pp. 27-69.
2. National & Sub-national Level
Week 13:12/08 Theme 4: Political Economy of Development

(Leading Discussions + Presentations)

Required:

Claus Offe, “Political Economy: Sociological Perspective,” in Robert E. Goodin and Hans-Dieter Klingemann (eds.) A New Handbook of Political Science, NY: Oxford University Press, pp. 645-674.

*Stephan Haggard et al., “Symposium on Government in Economic Development,” APSA-CP, Vol. 10, No. 1 (Winter 1999), pp. 14-26.

*Matthew A. Baum and David A. Lake, “The Political Economy of Growth: Democracy and Human Capital,” American Journal of Political Science, Vol. 47, No. 2 (April 2003), pp. 333-347.

*Francis Fukuyama and Sanjay Marwah, “Comparing East Asia and Latin America,” Journal of Democracy, Vol. 11, No. 4 (October 2000), pp.80-93.

* Chih-Chieh Chou (周志杰), “Governing State Credibility: State-Business Coordination for Economic Development in Singapore,” Asia Pacific Management Review, vol.12, no.4, (August 2007), pp.205-215.

* Chou, Chih-Chieh(周志杰), “Bridging the Global and the Local: China’s Effort of Linking Human Rights Discourse and Neo-Confucianism,” China Report: A Journal of East Asian Studies, vol.44, no.2 (May 2008), pp. 139-152.


Recommended:

*Karl W. Deutsch, “Social Mobilization and Political Development,” American Political Science Review, Vol. 55, No. 3 (September 1961), pp. 493-514.

*Guillermo O'Donnell, “Do Economists Know Best?” Journal of Democracy Vol. 6, No. 1 (1995), pp. 23-28.
Week 14: 12/15 Theme 5: Public Policy and Analysis

(Leading Discussions + Presentations)

Required:

*James G. March; Johan P. Olsen, “The New Institutionalism: Organizational Factors in Political Life,” American Political Science Review, Vol. 78, No. 3 (September 1984), pp. 734-749.

Richard J. Hofferbert and David L. Cingranelli, “Public Administration: Comparative Policy Analysis,” in Robert E. Goodin and Hans-Dieter Klingemann (eds.) A New Handbook of Political Science, NY: Oxford University Press, pp. 593-609.

Giandomenico Majone, “Public Policy and Administration: Ideas, Interests, and Institutions,” in Robert E. Goodin and Hans-Dieter Klingemann (eds.) A New Handbook of Political Science, NY: Oxford University Press, pp. 610-627.

Collin Campbell, S.J., “Political Executives and Their Officials,” in Ada Finifter (ed.), Political Science: the State of the Discipline II, Washington, D.C.: American Political Science Association, 1993, pp. 383-406.

*Paul Burstein, “The Impact of Public Opinion on Public Policy: A Review and an Agenda,” Political Research Quarterly, Vol. 56, No. 1 (March, 2003), pp. 29-40.

Recommended:

*Nicholas Henry, “Paradigms of Public Administration,” Public Administration Review, Vol. 35, No. 4 (Jul. - Aug., 1975), pp. 378-386.

Danold F. Kettl, “Public Administration: The State of the Field,” in Ada Finifter (ed.), Political Science: the State of the Discipline II, Washington, D.C.: American Political Science Association, 1993, pp. 407-430.

*Peter Bachrach; Morton S. Baratz, “Decisions and Nondecisions: An Analytical Framework,” American Political Science Review, Vol. 57, No. 3 (September 1963), pp. 632-642.
3. Geographic & Global Level
Week 15: 12/22 Theme 6: Global Issues

(Leading Discussions + Presentations)

Required:

Paul Krugman, “The confidence game,” Global Governance , Routledge, New York, 2004, pp.207-217.

Gerald K. Helleiner, “Markets, politics, and globalization: can the global economy be civilized?”, Global Governance , Routledge, New York, 2004, pp.253-271.

Emil J. Kirchner, “Regional and global security: changing threats and institutional responses,” Global Security Governance, Routledge, New York, 2006, pp.3-21.

Stemphan Haggard and Sylvia Maxfield, ”The political economy of financial internationalization in the developing world,” Global Governance, Routledge, New York, 2006, pp.71-105.

John Gerard Ruggie, “International regimes, transactions, and change: embedded liberalism in the postwar economic order,” Global Governance, Routledge, New York, 2006, pp.387-425.

Kenneth W. Abbot, Robert O. Keohane, Andrew Moravcsik, Anne-Marie Slaughter, and Duncan Snidal, “The concept of legalization,” International Law and International Relations, Cambridge University Press, 2006, pp.115-130.

Martha Fennimore and Stephen J. Toope, “Alternatives to Legalization: Richer Views of Law and Politics,” International Law and International Relations, Cambridge University Press, 2006, pp.188-204.

Recommended:

Paul F. Diehl, Charlotte Ku and Daniel Zamora, “The dynamic of international law: the interaction of Normative and operating systems,” International Law and International Relations, Cambridge University Press, 2006, pp.426-456.

Christopher Rudolph, “Constructing an Atrocities Regime: the Politics of War Crimes Tribunals,” International Law and International Relations, Cambridge University Press, 2006, pp.594-621.


Week 16: 12/29 Theme 7: Human Security and Development

(Leading Discussions + Presentations)

Required:

William T. Tow and Russell Trood, “Linkages between traditional security and human security,” Asia’s emerging regional order: Reconciling traditional and human security, The United National University Press, Japan, 2000, pp.13-32.

Withaya Sucharithanarugse, “The concept of human security extended Asianizing the paradigm,” Asia’s emerging regional order: Reconciling traditional and human security, The United National University Press, Japan, 2000, pp.49-61.

Timothy M. Shaw, Sandra J. Maclean and David R. Black, “Introduction a decade of human security: what prospects for global governance and new multilateralism?” A Decade of the Human Security, Ashgate Publishing Limited, England, 2006, pp.3-18.

Lan Smillie, “Whose security? Innovation and responsibility, perception and reality,” A Decade of the Human Security, Ashgate Publishing Limited, England, 2006, pp.19-30.

Antomio Franceschet, “Global legalism and human security,” A Decade of the Human Security, Ashgate Publishing Limited, England, 2006, pp.31-38.

Recommended:

Rory Keane, “EU foreign policy motivation: a mix of human security and realist elements,” A Decade of the Human Security, Ashgate Publishing Limited, England, 2006, pp.39-52.

周志杰,”Nexus of Good Governance Strategy and Human Rights Advocacy in International Financial Institutions: A Case Study on the World Bank”《社會科學論叢》,2卷1期 (2008年4月),頁23-59。


Week 17: 12/29 Presentation

Week 18: Term Paper Due in 01/12

Student Data
Please take a few minutes and fill in the following to help me locate you, if necessary, and have a better sense of your background.
Name: ___________________
How to contact you (E-mail Address or Phone Number)?
___________________________________
Class Year: 碩一____ 碩二 ____ 碩三 ____ 博士生 ____ 其他 ____
Major and/or Minor in your undergraduate program (大學之主、副修或輔系):
Major: _____________________________, Minor: __________________________
Please comment on any backgrounds and interests you have regarding political/social scientific methodology or any of the themes and issues identified in the syllabus.

- End -


Syllabus Fall 2009 研究方法論




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