Graduate Curriculum Committee Course Proposal Form for Courses Numbered 5000 and Higher Note: Before completing this form, please carefully read the accompanying instructions



Download 64.52 Kb.
Date conversion13.05.2016
Size64.52 Kb.
one_line_logotype_fs


Graduate Curriculum Committee Course Proposal Form

for Courses Numbered 5000 and Higher
Note: Before completing this form, please carefully read the accompanying instructions.

Submission guidelines are posted to the GCC Web site: http://www.ecu.edu/cs-acad/gcc/index.cfm



12/2/2013

ENGL 6250
Course prefix and number: 2. Date:




  1. Requested action:







New Course

X

Revision of Active Course




Revision & Unbanking of a Banked Course




Renumbering of an Existing Course from

from

#

to

#




Required




Elective



  1. Method(s) of delivery (check all boxes that apply for both current/proposed and expected future delivery methods within the next three years):

Current or Expected

Proposed Delivery Future Delivery

Method(s): Method(s):

X




On-campus (face to face)




X







Distance Course (face to face off campus)













Online (delivery of 50% or more of the instruction is offered online)










  1. Justification. Identify the committee or group (e.g., Graduate faculty of the Department of English) that conducted the assessment of curriculum and student learning. Explain why the unit wishes to offer or revise the course. Include specific results from the unit assessment that led to the development or modification of the course. If applicable, cite any accrediting agency/ies and reference the specific standard/s.

The Department of English is undertaking a large-scale revision of its literature course offerings. Program assessment undertaken by the graduate faculty of the Department of English and advising data suggest that our literature curriculum has too many numbered courses and is confusing to students. It is also difficult to manage administratively.

English 6250, American Literature After 1865, is a special topics course on American Literature; it combines ENGL 6250: American Realism, 6260: 20th Century American Literature, and allows for 21st Century American Literature. Each time ENGL 6250 is offered it will have a specific focus on author, genre, period or cross-period studies (and so may be repeated for credit). Because the focus of ENGL 6250 can change depending on curricular needs and the instructor teaching the course, it will allow the Graduate Faculty to cover literary periods and genres regularly in our schedule while also encouraging faculty to focus courses in innovative ways that engage students. The English graduate faculty voted to approve this course revision on December 2, 2013.




  1. Course description exactly as it should appear in the next catalog:

ENGL 6250 - American Literature After 1865



3

May be repeated for a maximum of 9 s.h. with change of topic. Advanced study of authors, periods, subjects, and genres within, as well as approaches to, American literature after 1865. 






  1. If this is a course revision, briefly describe the requested change:

This course is becoming a topics-based course.




  1. Course credit:

Lecture Hours

3

Weekly

OR




Per Term

Credit Hours

3

s.h.

Lab




Weekly

OR




Per Term

Credit Hours




s.h.

Studio




Weekly

OR




Per Term

Credit Hours




s.h.

Practicum




Weekly

OR




Per Term

Credit Hours




s.h.

Internship




Weekly

OR




Per Term

Credit Hours




s.h.

Other (e.g., independent study) Please explain.




s.h.

Total Credit Hours

3

s.h.



15

  1. Anticipated annual student enrollment:



  1. Changes in degree hours of your programs:

Degree(s)/Program(s)

Changes in Degree Hours

N/A

N/A









  1. Affected degrees or academic programs, other than your programs:

Degree(s)/Program(s)

Changes in Degree Hours

N/A

N/A









  1. Overlapping or duplication with affected units or programs:

X

Not applicable




Documentation of notification to the affected academic degree programs is attached.



  1. Council for Teacher Education (CTE) approval (for courses affecting teacher education):

X

Not applicable




Applicable and CTE has given their approval.




  1. University Service-Learning Committee (USLC) approval:

X

Not applicable




Applicable and USLC has given their approval.




  1. Statements of support:

a. Staff

X

Current staff is adequate




Additional staff is needed (describe needs in the box below):






b. Facilities

X

Current facilities are adequate




Additional facilities are needed (describe needs in the box below):




c. Library

X

Initial library resources are adequate




Initial resources are needed (in the box below, give a brief explanation and an estimate for the cost of acquisition of required initial resources):






d. Unit computer resources


X

Unit computer resources are adequate




Additional unit computer resources are needed (in the box below, give a brief explanation and an estimate for the cost of acquisition):




e. ITCS resources


X

ITCS resources are not needed




The following ITCS resources are needed (put a check beside each need):




Mainframe computer system




Statistical services




Network connections




Computer lab for students




Software

Approval from the Director of ITCS attached




  1. Course information (see: Graduate Curriculum and Program Development Manual for instructions):


Note: This is a sample syllabus for the course. Other versions of the course will have different readings and course content, but all iterations of the course share the same outcomes.
a. Textbook(s) and/or readings: author(s), name, publication date, publisher, and city/state/country. Include ISBN (when applicable).

20TH Century American Literature

Course Description: 20th Century American writers and works associated with the newly acquired Stuart Wright Collection are featured in the course. The SWC at Joyner Library also contains a fair amount of unpublished material, so graduate students interested in publication and research may find opportunities there. The course is taught in seminar with plenty of time for reading, research, and reflection. Primary research opportunities will be pointed out.

Course Texts:

Jarrell, Randall. Selected Poems. New York: FSG, 2007. ISBN 978-0374530884.

Porter, Katherine Anne. The Collected Stories. Florida: Harcourt, 1979. ISBN
978-1561887675.

Taylor, Peter. The Collected Stories. New York: FSG, 2009. ISBN 978-0374531843.

Tretheway, Natasha. Native Guard. Florida: Mariner, 2007. ISBN 978-0618872657.

Warren, Robert Penn. All the King’s Men. Florida: Harcourt, 1990. ISBN


978-0151047727.

Warren, Robert Penn. Poetry and Democracy. Cambridge: Harvard University Press,


1976. ISBN 978-0674196261.

Welty, Eudora. The Wide Net and Other Stories. Florida: Mariner, 1974. ISBN


978-0156966108.







b. Course objectives for the course (student – centered, behavioral focus)

If this is a 5000-level course that is populated by undergraduate and graduate students, there must be differentiation in the learning objectives expected.

Upon completion of this course, students will be able to:

  • Analyze American Literature after 1865.

  • Formulate and express compelling discussion and research questions about American literature.

  • Recognize and assess the range of critical interpretations and theoretical approaches that can be applied to American literature.

  • Write a research prospectus and research paper that use and synthesize primary and secondary source materials and databases.




c. Course topic outline

The list of topics should reflect the stated objectives.

Course Project/ Topic Outline:

  1. Read selections from the course texts and analyze in class discussion (objective one)

  2. Write short essays in response to ideas and research presented in the seminars (objectives two and three)

  3. Write one research proposal regarding a literary figure, literary history, or critical approach (objectives three and four)




d. List of course assignments, weighting of each assignment, and grading/evaluation system for determining a grade


Assignments and weights:

Seminar Participation 10%

Short Essays 15% (each)

Research paper 60%

Grade scale:

A 90-100


B 80-89
C 70-79
F 69 and below








Approved by GCC April 2012; posted summer of 2012


The database is protected by copyright ©essaydocs.org 2016
send message

    Main page