Grade Band 8-12 Estimated Lesson Time



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The Holocaust and Anne Frank: A Lesson in

The Power of Propaganda
Author

Crystal Elliott

San Angelo, TX
Grade Band

8-12
Estimated Lesson Time

One 50 minute lesson
Overview
The Holocaust affected millions of people, yet one young girl is most associated with it. Her name was Anne Frank. The power of Nazi Germany and the powerlessness of the Jewish people (among others) starkly contrast one another. Anne Frank became a powerful voice for the Jews by documenting her thoughts, and experiences in her diary. Through the use of authentic literature and a critical analysis of propaganda samples students will learn to analyze complex social realities such as advertising and political slogans. They will learn to be more critical, vigilant citizens who understand they must analyze not only the message, but also the messenger.
From Theory to Practice
Lindquist, D. (2008). Five perspectives for teaching the holocaust. American Secondary Education, 36(3), 4-14. Retrieved July 22, 2009 from http://search.ebscohost.com.easydb.angelo.edu/login.aspx?direct=true&db=ehh &AN=34213055&site=ehost-live


  • “The Holocaust can also be a lens through which students examine the political and social realities of the complex world they will face as adults.”

  • “Studying the event allows the student to analyze what happens when power goes unchecked, thus providing real-life examples of the vigilance they must practice as citizens of a 21st century democracy if the democracy way-of-life is to be preserved.”

  • As a result of this lesson “students realize that they need to dig, search, analyze, and synthesize as they seek answers to [historical] questions regarding rationales, motives, and causes” (especially as it pertains to propaganda).

Spector, K., & Jones, S. (2007). Constructing Anne Frank: Critical literacy and the Holocaust in eighth-grade english. Journal of Adolescent & Adult Literacy, 51(1), 36-48. Retrieved July 23, 2009, from http://search.ebscohost.com.easydb.angelo.edu/login.aspx?direct=true&db=ehh &AN=26561895&site=ehost-live



  • “Get students thinking about the sources of their information.”

  • “Instead of passively consuming ideology… (students need to be) engaging in critical literacy practices through actively constructing meaning”.

  • “Engaging a critical approach…will create powerful literacy through which students can deconstruct their world.”


Student Objectives

Students will:




  • Analyze, make inferences and draw conclusions about the author’s purpose in cultural, historical, and contemporary contexts, and provide evidence from the text to support their understanding.

  • Use comprehension skills to analyze how words, images, graphics, and sounds work together to impact meaning. They will evaluate the role of the media in focusing attention on events and informing opinion on issues.

  • Write a persuasive text to influence the attitudes or actions of a specific audience on specific issues.


Resources:


  • Instructional Materials

  • Pens / Pencils

  • Glue

  • Construction paper

  • Glue

  • Markers

  • The Diary of Anne Frank – text

  • Demonstrative propaganda from WWII

  • Sample bumper stickers with persuasive messages

Handouts:




Instructional Plan
Instruction and Activities

  1. Ask students to brainstorm about commercials they remember from advertisements from the newspaper, billboards, and the Superbowl. (Examples may include the Budweiser horses, Pepsi, Coke, Chips, etc.)

  2. Ask students to share memorable commercials with the class and discuss what makes them memorable. Students will need to explain whether the commercial was advertising a product, a service, or a person. They should put them in categories on the board with dry erase markers.

  3. Explain what propaganda is and how it is used in society today, such as in product / service advertising, and in political ads.

  4. Ask students to ponder something they feel strongly about such as a certain brand of shoes, a person, or a charitable cause. Show the students samples of contemporary propaganda bumper stickers. Ask students to explain each sample.

  5. Explain that in their activity today they will create propaganda for a bumper sticker to support their cause, person, etc. They will need to use words, colors, and / or pictures to create a bumper sticker that will persuade others to support their cause, person, product, etc.

  6. Hand out materials for students to use to produce their bumper sticker and explain they have 20 minutes to complete the activity.

  7. Wrap up the activity by asking students to share their stickers with the class. Peers should try and guess what the sticker is meant to say or support. The student who did the sticker will confirm their guesses or if no one guessed correctly the student may briefly explain its’ actual meaning.

  8. Introduce the book The Diary of Anne Frank . Make connections between how propaganda was used to alienate Jews such as Anne.


Extensions


  • This lesson could be used in Social Studies to explore cultural bias and racism

  • The lesson could be used in History to parallel the history of the Holocaust with contemporary incidents of genocide.

  • The lesson could also include a scientific exploration of malnutrition and the human testing which occurred. Further, the biological “inferiority” of the Jews and the biological “superiority” of the German Nazis could be compared and contrasted.


Student Assessment / Reflections

  • Observe participation in activity such as brainstorming, drafting, revising, and editing.

  • Informally assess students’ comprehension of the concept of propaganda by listening to students’ conversations during brainstorming, bumper sticker construction, and during share time at the end of the lesson.

  • Students will be assessed on their visual product’s ability to produce the desired persuasive message on a scale of 1-5. (A one will be equal to an F, a two will be a D, a three will be a C, a four will be a B, and a five will equal an A)


IRA/NCTE Standards
Standard 4: Students adjust their use of spoken, written, and visual language (e.g., conventions, style, vocabulary) to communicate effectively with a variety of audiences and for different purposes.
Standard 6: Students apply knowledge of language structure, language conventions (e.g., spelling and punctuation), media techniques, figurative language, and genre to create, critique, and discuss print and non-print texts.
Standard 12: Students use spoken, written, and visual language to accomplish their own purposes (e.g., for learning, enjoyment, persuasion, and the exchange of information).
TEKS:

Reading / Language Arts - Grade 8


110.20 – 9

Analyze, make inferences and draw conclusions about the author’s purpose in cultural, historical, and contemporary contexts, and provide evidence from the text to support their understanding.

110.20 – 13 a

Use comprehension skills to analyze how words, images, graphics, and sounds work together to impact meaning. They will evaluate the role of the media in focusing attention on events and informing opinion on issues.

110.20-18 a

Write a persuasive text to influence the attitudes or actions of a specific audience on specific issues.


Additional Resources
http://www1.yadvashem.org/exhibitions/album_auschwitz/mutimedia/index.html

http://www.genocideintervention.net/

http://www.nbc.com/nbc-news/video/episodes/#vid=1137606

http://www.annefrankwall.org/unitlessonplan.html

http://www.dosomething.org/whatsyourthing/International+Human+Rights/Darfur?gclid=CMiz3Pab8ZsCFZJM5Qod3xj5-w

  • Teaching the Holocaust - Memorial that teaches about the topic using stamps, pictures, text and paintings.

  • Voices of the Holocaust - Interviews conducted in 1946 in displaced persons camps around Europe.

  • Nizkor - US military film footage and other evidence of the reality of the Holocaust.

  • Online History Project - The effect of the horrors of the holocaust on child victims.

  • Museum of Tolerance - Museum focusing on racism in America and the history of the Holocaust.

  • Holocaust Research Resources - Annotated links and original material on the Holocaust.

  • Holocaust Teacher Resource Center - Lesson plans and related materials for teachers.

  • The Holocaust World Resource Center - An international center for Holocaust resources; presents stories, articles, and resources on the Holocaust and Eastern European Jewry.

  • Holocaust Links - Directory of websites providing information, literature, lesson plans, organizations, and other topics related to the Nazi genocide.

  • Dachau Concentration Camp Memorial Site - History of the camp and details of the fates of former prisoners.

  • Auschwitz and Birkenau - Virtual museum of the Holocaust and Nazi Germany's death camps. Includes map of the camps, chronology, and photo archives.

Propaganda Bumper Sticker Sample


Have students get in small groups and discuss the meaning intended from this bumper sticker. What are they really saying by posting this on a vehicle?


Holocaust Propaganda Samples








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