Grade: 5 Unit: 6



Download 90.22 Kb.
Date conversion09.06.2016
Size90.22 Kb.
Montgomery Bus Boycott ELA-S Unit Overview
Grade: 5 Unit: 6
Duration: 26 days Dates: April 14--June 5, 2015


Essential Questions

  • How does an author use narrative structure and techniques to tell a true story?

  • How can people effect social change?

  • ¿Cómo usa un narrador la estructura y las técnicas narrativas y para contar una historia.

  • ¿Cómo pueden las personas influir en un cambio social?




Unit Overview

In this unit, fifth graders strengthen their nonfiction literacy skills while learning about the Montgomery bus boycott. During the first week, students read texts that not only build background knowledge about the civil rights movement, but also introduce students to the hybrid genre of narrative nonfiction. In accordance with the language allocation guidelines, the first week will be instructed in Spanish and then students will Bridge their learning into English with reading and writing bridge lessons provided. After the Bridge,students continue to explore narrative nonfiction through grade-level complex texts focused on the Montgomery bus boycott, culminating in the reading of Freedom Walkers: The Story of the Montgomery Bus Boycott by Russell Freedman. For students to access grade-level complex texts, two structures are integrated throughout the unit: close reading and text-dependent questions. At the end of the unit, students have the tools and knowledge to produce a piece of quality narrative nonfiction centered on one historical figure from Freedom Walkers. Fifth graders will be able to synthesize information from several sources, including texts and websites, and use that information to write their own narrative nonfiction stories. Students wrap up the unit with oral presentations of their stories during Writing Workshop.
Please note, all embedded links require additional authorization. In order to view the online material, please use this link: https://drive.google.com/folderview?id=0B8ppBxBL6B9Dfk5lT1c0ZzlJMmZlajI1d2VDcllHWThoMUNFanpSWTZjOUM0R2ROLUphOVE&usp=sharing




Performance-Based Assessment/Evaluación de Rendimiento

Students will create a narrative nonfiction story about the Montgomery bus boycott from the perspective of one of the following historical figures.

  • Rosa Parks

  • Martin Luther King, Jr.

  • Jo Ann Robinson

  • Claudette Colvin

Student choice is limited to support the production of high-quality work in a short amount of time. Choices are listed in order of challenge for students.


In the PBA, students must:

  • Use information and facts they learned from sources during this unit. (W.5.9)

  • Orient readers by establishing situations and introducing narrators and/or characters; organize event sequences that unfold naturally. (W.5.3a)

  • Use narrative techniques, such as dialogue, description, and pacing, to develop experiences and events or show characters’ responses to situations. (W.5.3b)

  • Develop topics with facts, definitions, concrete details, quotations, or other information and examples correlated to the topics. (W.5.2b)

  • Use precise language and domain-specific vocabulary to inform about or explain topics. (W.5.2d)

At the end of the unit, students orally present their narrative nonfiction stories to the class during Writing Workshop.


Performance-Based Assessment Resources:


  • PBA Prompt Handout

  • PBA Prompt Handout (Spanish)

  • PBA Rubric

  • PBA Student-Friendly Rubric

  • PBA Student Exemplar







Standards

Both the unit focus standards and general standards are listed in the following sections. Note that standards RI.5.1 and RI.5.10 are not included, which was done intentionally as the two standards should be at the center of each and every lesson. Additionally, RI.5.4 and RL.5.4 are incorporated into every lesson in the oracy building activity.For a complete list of standards addressed in each lesson, see the CCSS Standards Matrix.




Focus Standards

RI.5.2

Determine two or more main ideas of a text and explain how they are supported by key details; summarize the text.

RI.5.3

Explain the relationships or interactions between two or more individuals, events, ideas, or concepts in a historical, scientific, or technical text based on specific information in the text.

W.5.2

Write informative/explanatory texts to examine a topic and convey ideas and information clearly.

b. Develop the topic with facts, definitions, concrete details, quotations, or other information and

examples related to the topic.

d. Use precise language and domain-specific vocabulary to inform about or explain the topic.



W.5.3

Write narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or events using effective technique, descriptive details, and clear event sequences.

  1. Orient the reader by establishing a situation and introducing a narrator and/or characters; organize an event sequence that unfolds naturally.

  2. Use narrative techniques, such as dialogue, description, and pacing, to develop experiences and events or show the responses of characters to situations.

W.5.9

Draw evidence from literary or informational texts to support analysis, reflection, and research.

SL.5.4

Report on a topic or text or present an opinion, sequencing ideas logically and using appropriate facts and relevant, descriptive details to support main ideas or themes; speak clearly at an understandable pace.




General Standards

RI.5.2

Determine two or more main ideas of a text and explain how they are supported by key details; summarize the text.

RI.5.3

Explain the relationships or interactions between two or more individuals, events, ideas, or concepts in a historical, scientific, or technical text based on specific information in the text.

RI.5.9

Integrate information from several texts on the same topic in order to write or speak about the subject knowledgeably.

RL.5.2

Determine a theme of a story, drama, or poem from details in the text, including how characters in a story or drama respond to challenges or how the speaker in a poem reflects upon a topic; summarize the text.

RL.5.3

Compare and contrast two or more characters, settings, or events in a story or drama, drawing on specific details in the text (e.g., how characters interact).

RL.5.5

Explain how a series of chapters, scenes, or stanzas fits together to provide the overall structure of a particular story, drama, or poem.

W.5.2

Write informative/explanatory texts to examine a topic and convey ideas and information clearly.

a. Introduce a topic clearly, provide a general observation and focus, and group related information logically; include formatting (e.g., headings), illustrations, and multimedia when useful to aiding comprehension.

b. Develop the topic with facts, definitions, concrete details, quotations, or other information and examples related to the topic.

d. Use precise language and domain-specific vocabulary to inform about or explain the topic.



W.5.3

Write narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or events using effective technique, descriptive details, and clear event sequences.

a. Orient the reader by establishing a situation and introducing a narrator and/or characters; organize an event sequence that unfolds naturally.

b. Use narrative techniques, such as dialogue, description, and pacing, to develop experiences and events or show the responses of characters to situations.


W.5.4

Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development and organization are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience. (Grade-specific expectations for writing types are defined in standards 1-3 above.)

W.5.5

With guidance and support from peers and adults, develop and strengthen writing as needed by planning, revising, editing, rewriting, or trying a new approach. (Editing for conventions should demonstrate command of Language standards 1-3 up to and including grade 5 here.)

W.5.8

Recall relevant information from experiences or gather relevant information from print and digital sources; summarize or paraphrase information in notes and finished work, and provide a list of sources.

W.5.9

Draw evidence from literary or informational texts to support analysis, reflection, and research.

L.5.4

Determine or clarify the meaning of unknown and multiple-meaning words and phrases based on grade 5 reading and content, choosing flexibly from a range of strategies.

  1. Use context (e.g., cause/effect relationships and comparisons in text) as a clue to the meaning of a word or phrase.

c. Consult reference materials (e.g., dictionaries, glossaries, thesauruses), both print and digital, to find

the pronunciation and determine or clarify the precise meaning of key words and phrases.



SL.5.2

Summarize a written text read aloud or information presented in diverse media and formats, including visually, quantitatively, and orally.

SL.5.4

Report on a topic or text or present an opinion, sequencing ideas logically and using appropriate facts and relevant, descriptive details to support main ideas or themes; speak clearly at an understandable pace.


Unit Shifts

Standards-Based Instruction

This unit was created on the foundation of standards-based instruction. Unit development began by closely analyzing the Common Core State Standards (CCSS) and determining focus standards to drive teaching and learning toward the performance-based assessment. Individual lessons were intentionally designed to build in complexity, creating opportunities for students to build proficiency toward the standards. Student mastery of the focus standards is evaluated in the end-of-unit performance-based assessment.


Reading Closely

In this unit, students read texts closely multiple times. The functional purpose of close reading is for students to move beyond summarizing what they read to analyzing and deeply comprehending texts, which usually requires several readings in which students build their understanding with each additional reading. Note that there is not one “right” way for students to read closely—close reading looks different in various lessons, depending on the lesson objective. The concept of close reading is not a process but rather, an end goal of gaining a thorough understanding of texts and the implications. Close reading lessons should include:

  • Selection of brief, high-quality, complex texts, worthy of close reading,

  • Individual reading and/or group reading aloud texts,

  • Text-based questions that guide students to analyze authors’ words, rather than simply connect to their own experiences or opinions, and

  • Student discussion and/or writing in response to texts.

An overview of selected unit texts can be found here.

Unit Supports

Text-Dependent Questions Supports

Text-dependent questions are a CCSS shift away from text connections and basic recall. To better understand what they read, students need to work directly with texts. In this unit, students have multiple opportunities to deepen their understandings through text-dependent questions. Students are expected to refer to texts and provide text evidence to support their thinking. Text-dependent questions in this unit are intended to guide student thinking and scaffold students’ access to texts’ deeper ideas (e.g., author’s purpose, theme, inference).

Language Supports

Every interactive read-aloud begins with an oracy building activity, which previews the book’s content, key vocabulary, and/or language structures, to get students listening to and using language to successfully understand and discuss the text.
Every lesson Content/Language Objective (CLO) includes:

  • Lesson content focus,

  • Domain of language that lesson targets (i.e., reading, writing, speaking, listening),

  • Function of language, or how students will use language (e.g., explain, describe, analyze),

  • Form of language, which can include grammatical structures, syntax, and academic vocabulary, and

  • Differentiated supports for English language learners (ELLs) at various English proficiency levels.

CLOs are a teacher planning tool, offering suggestions. Use and modify based on your student’s needs. Put them in kid-friendly language for student use in the classroom.


For more suggestions on scaffolding and differentiating lessons for ELLs at various language levels, refer to the Differentiation Guides in the ELD tab of the Standards Toolkit.

Technology Supports

Google Docs: If you have daily access, incorporate technology into the unit by having students complete their performance-based assessments in Google Docs. The unique sharing capability allows you to view student work and provide feedback in a timely manner. Below are helpful links if you decide to support students in creating PBAs with Google Docs.

  • Create, move, or delete a folder

  • Upload files and folders

  • Overview of Google Docs, Sheets, and Slides

  • How to share

Safari Montage: Take advantage of the the vast amount of video resources available online to enrich students’ background knowledge of the civil rights movement. A couple of unit lessons require Safari Montage access. Make sure you can log in and find and view videos before showing in class. To use Safari Montage, you must use one of the following compatible browsers.

  • Internet Explorer (IE)

  • Safari

  • Firefox

  • Chrome for Windows, not Mac

To login, use your DPS Webmail username and password.

  • Username = usually FirstName_Lastname

  • Password = user defined

To view videos, install the Safari Montage Media Player. If the latest player is not installed on your computer, you will be prompted at login to download and run the installer. Remember to close and restart the browser before logging in again.

Windows users also require QuickTime 7.7. Download and install that software here.



ELA-S LESSON SEQUENCE

Click on the lesson number to access the lessons and lesson resources.

Please note that after the Bridge your lessons will occur one day after the lesson occurs in an ELA-E classroom.

Blue = Instruction in Spanish Yellow = Bridge days Green = Instruction in English


LESSON

1


2


3


4


5


TEXT

El boicot a los autobuses de Montgomery

El boicot a los autobuses de Montgomery

Rosa Parks y el movimiento por los derechos civiles

Chapters 1–3,

¿Quién fue Martin Luther King, Jr.?



Chapters 4–6,

¿Quién fue Martin Luther King, Jr.?



INTERACTIVE READ ALOUD

IN

SPANISH

Introducing
the Montgomery bus boycott (RI.5.2)

Determining
main idea (RI.5.2)

Determining main idea and key details (RI.5.2)

Determining
main idea (RI.5.2)

Determining
main idea (RI.5.2)

READING WORKSHOP

IN

SPANISH

Determining
main idea (RI.5.2)

Identifying
key details (RI.5.2)


Synthesizing multiple sources
on the same topic (RI.5.9)

Paraphrasing
main idea and details (RI.5.2)

Determining underlying theme (RL.5.2)



WRITING WORKSHOP

IN

SPANISH


Building background knowledge

(SL.5.2, W.5.8)



Introducing the Performance- Based Assessment

(W.5.4)


Gathering relevant information and organizing notes

(W.5.8)


Gathering relevant information and organizing notes

(W.5.8)


Gathering relevant information and organizing notes

(W.5.8)




LESSON

Bridge


6

7

8

9

TEXT

N/A

Rosa

Rosa Parks: Civil Rights Pioneer

Rosa Parks: Civil Rights Pioneer

“Chapter Two: Claudette Colvin,” Freedom Walkers

INTERACTIVE READ ALOUD

N/A*

Analyzing characters, settings, and plot events (RL.5.3)

Comparing
two texts on the same topic (RI.5.5)

Synthesizing
two texts on the same topic (RI.5.9)

Determining
main idea (RI.5.2)

READING WORKSHOP

Reading Bridge

Lesson


Analyzing characters, settings, and plot events (RL.5.3)

Comparing
two texts on the same topic (RI.5.5)

Synthesizing
two texts on the same topic (RI.5.9)

Determining meanings of unknown words

(L.5.4a)


WRITING WORKSHOP


Writing Bridge

Lesson


Analyzing
how authors
orient readers

(W.5.3a)


Incorporating historical facts
and information

(W.5.2b)


Analyzing
word choice

(W.5.2d, W.5.3d)



Analyzing dialogue

(W.5.3b)



LESSON

10

11

12

13

14

TEXT

“Chapter Two: Claudette Colvin,” Freedom Walkers

“Chapter One:
Jo Ann Robinson,” Freedom Walkers

“Chapter One:
Jo Ann Robinson,” Freedom Walkers

“Chapter Five: Boycott Heroes,” Freedom Walkers

“Chapter Five: Boycott Heroes,” Freedom Walkers

INTERACTIVE READ ALOUD

Identifying
key details (RI.5.2)

Determining meanings of unknown words

(L.5.4a)


Determining
main idea

(RI.5.2)


Determining meanings of unknown words

(RL5.4)


Determining main idea and key details (RI.5.2)

READING WORKSHOP

Answering questions using text evidence

(RI.5.3)


Analyzing
text structure in narrative nonfiction

(RL.5.5)


Analyzing
text structure in narrative nonfiction

(RL.5.5)


Analyzing
the impact of quotes

(RL.5.4)


Investigating different perspectives

(RI.5.3)


WRITING WORKSHOP


Gathering relevant information and organizing notes

(W.5.8)


Developing
an underlying theme (W.5.3b)


Planning plot events

(W.5.3a, W.5.9)



Planning orientations

(W.5.3a, W.5.9)



Planning
how to incorporate historical facts
and information

(W.5.2b, W.5.9)





LESSON

15

16

17

18

19

TEXT

“Chapter Five: Boycott Heroes,” Freedom Walkers

“Chapter Six: Proud to Be Arrested,”

Freedom Walkers

“Chapter Six: Proud to Be Arrested,”

Freedom Walkers

“Chapter Six: Proud to Be Arrested,”

Freedom Walkers

“Chapter Seven: Walking to Victory,”

Freedom Walkers

INTERACTIVE READ ALOUD

Answering questions using text evidence

(RI.5.3)


Identifying
key details (RI.5.2)

Identifying
key details (RI.5.2)

Identifying
key details (RI.5.2)

Determining meanings of unknown words (L.5.4c)

READING WORKSHOP

Answering questions using text evidence

(RI.5.3)


Analyzing key details and their impact
(RI 5.3)

Inferring character traits (RL.5.3)

Explaining relationships between key figures and events (RI.5.3)

Reading closely and providing feedback

(RL.5.5)


WRITING WORKSHOP

Drafting and incorporating historical facts
and precise
word choice

(W.5.2b, W.5.2d, W.5.9)



Drafting and developing dialogue

(W.5.3b, W.5.9)




Drafting and developing
word choice

(W.5.3d, W.5.9)



Drafting and checking for evidence of narrative nonfiction characteristics

(W.5.3)


Conferencing
with peers and providing feedback

(W.5.5)




LESSON

20

21

22

23

24

TEXT

“Chapter Seven: Walking to Victory,”

Freedom Walkers

“Chapter Seven: Walking to Victory,”

Freedom Walkers

Rosa’s Bus
and Witnesses
to Freedom


Rosa’s Bus
and Witnesses
to Freedom


Rosa’s Bus
and Witnesses
to Freedom


INTERACTIVE READ ALOUD

Acquiring academic vocabulary

(L.5.4c)


Determining
main idea

(RI.5.2)


Identifying key details (RI.5.2)

Identifying key details (RL.5.2)

Evaluating
the impact of events on key historical figures

(RI.5.3)



READING WORKSHOP

Determining
main ideas

(RI.5.2)


Evaluating
the impact of events

(RI.5.3)


Investigating traits of key historical figures

(RI.5.3)


Investigating traits of key historical figures

(RI.5.3)


Evaluating
the impact of events on key historical figures

(RI.5.3)



WRITING WORKSHOP

Revising drafts based on feedback

(W.5.5)


Editing, publishing, and practicing presentations

(W.5.5, SL.5.4)



Practicing presentations

(W5.4, SL.5.4)



Presentation day

(W5.4, SL.5.4)



Presentation day

(W5.4, SL.5.4a)





LESSON

25

26










TEXT

I Have a Dream” speech video

The Montgomery Bus Boycott










INTERACTIVE READ ALOUD

Identifying
key details (SL.5.2)

Evaluating the impact of events on key historical figures

(RI.5.3, RI.5.9)












READING WORKSHOP

Evaluating the impact of events on the community

(RI.5.3)


Evaluating the impact of key historical figures

(RI.5.3, RI.5.9)












WRITING WORKSHOP

Presentation day

(W5.4, SL.5.4)



Presentation day

(W5.4, SL.5.4)













* Because day 6 is a Bridging day, an interactive read aloud is not provided. Feel free to do an interactive read aloud of your choice, related to the content of the unit.


The database is protected by copyright ©essaydocs.org 2016
send message

    Main page