Grade 4: Module 1: Unit 3: Lesson 5 Creating Our Parts of the Constitution



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Grade 4: Module 1: Unit 3: Lesson 5

Creating Our Parts of the Constitution


Long-Term Targets Addressed (Based on NYSP12 ELA CCLS)

I can write an informative/explanatory text. (W.4.2)

Supporting Learning Targets

Ongoing Assessment

  • I can create a rule or law for a constitution that will improve our school community.



Agenda

Teaching Notes

  1. Opening

  1. Engaging the Writer (5 minutes)

  1. Work Time

  1. Revisiting the Great Law of Peace (10 minutes)

  2. Comparing the Great Law of Peace to Possible Rules to Strengthen Our School Community (15 minutes)

  3. Drafting Our Part of the Constitution (20 minutes)

  1. Closing and Assessment

  1. Debrief (5 minutes)

  2. Exit Ticket (5 minutes)

  1. Homework



  • Choose student pairs. Each pair will create a section of the constitution.

  • Consider assigning two of your stronger writers to write the introduction, since this task is particularly challenging.

  • Display anchor charts: the Great Law of Peace (from Unit 1) and Possible Rules to Strengthen Our School Community (from Lesson 1 of Unit 3)




Lesson Vocabulary

Materials

conflict resolution, territory, assemble, address, deliberation, peaceful, patient, calm, discuss, respect

  • Sections 1, 4, 7, 24, 93, and 107 of the Great Law of Peace (Iroquois Constitution) (one per student) (from Unit 1, Lesson 3 and Unit 2, Lesson 12)

  • Possible Rules to Strengthen Our School Community anchor chart (from Lesson 3)

  • Constitution Writing Frame (one per student)



Opening

Meeting Students’ Needs

A. Engaging the Writer (5 minutes)

  • Orient students to the learning target: “I can create a rule or law for a constitution that will improve our school community.” Circle the phrase improve our school community. Ask the students: “From our analysis, what have we discovered needs improvement in schools in general and maybe even in our school?” Listen for responses such as: “Students aren’t getting along with one another,” “There are places in school where students are being hurt,” or “Some students are misbehaving and being disrespectful.” Allow several students to share.

  • Remind the students of the conversations they had the last few days discussing the need for a constitution. Review key concepts from Unit 1. Ask the class: “What is a constitution?” Students should share that a constitution is a document that gives rules and guidelines for people to follow so that conflicts are prevented or resolved in a peaceful way.

  • Ask the students: “What does conflict resolution mean?” Based on the articles students have close read, they should explain that conflict resolution refers to steps or guidelines people follow to prevent problems from happening, or to peacefully solve problems already occurring. Invite several students to share examples of how to resolve conflicts at school.

  • Say to the students: “It’s important that we fully understand not only what a constitution is, but how one will help improve our school.” Emphasize that it is the people, not the document, that “make things right.” Explain to students that the document provides rules and strategies to prevent or solve problems in our school in a peaceful way.

  • Explain that today they will begin to write parts of the constitution in small groups. Remind students that the parts of the constitution will explain rules for the school community to follow in order to prevent or solve any problems that might occur.

  • For ELLs, consider providing extra time for tasks and answering questions in class discussions. ELLs often need more time to process and translate information. ELLs receive extended time as an accommodation on NY State assessments.

  • Clarifying vocabulary meets the needs of ELLs and other students developing academic language.

  • Use thoughtful grouping: Consider partnering an ELL with a student who speaks the same L1 when discussion of complex content is required. This can allow students to have more meaningful discussions and clarify points in their L1.



Work Time

Meeting Students’ Needs

A. Revisiting the Great Law of Peace (10 minutes)

  • Reorient the students to Sections 1, 4, 7, 24, 93, and 107 of the Great Law of Peace (Iroquois Constitution). Invite the students to reread the document independently.

  • After rereading, ask students to turn and talk, discussing the following words with a partner: territory, assemble, address, and deliberation. Ask the students to define each word and discuss how it relates to creating a constitution that will help solve problems at school. (For example, students will define deliberation as a careful thought and discussion that is necessary to solving problems at school because hasty decision making can create bigger or worse problems.)

  • Orient students to the Possible Rules to Strengthen Our School Community anchor chart. Give the students several minutes to reread the chart independently. Ask the students to discuss with a partner how the rules help improve their school. Invite a few students to share their discussion with the whole group.

  • For students needing additional support, consider offering a sentence frame, sentence starter, or a cloze sentence to assist with language production and provide the structure required.

  • Consider allowing students to draw their observations, ideas, or notes when appropriate. This allows ELLs to participate in a meaningful way.

  • Consider writing and displaying steps for multistep directions. ELLs can return to the steps to make sure they are on track.

  • Vary the methods for response for students who struggle with writing tasks.




Work Time (continued)

Meeting Students’ Needs

B. Comparing the Great Law of Peace to Possible Rules to Strengthen Our School Community (15 minutes)

  • Explain to the students that these two documents already include some of the main ideas they have been reading and talking about. They will be using these two documents to identify important rules or laws to include in their constitution.

  • Ask the students to look for similarities between the Great Law of Peace and the Possible Rules to Strengthen Our School Community. Invite them to turn and talk with a partner, then share out.

  • If necessary, model: Point out that the Great Law of Peace instructs the people to, “not allow the space to become dusty or dirty” and one of the Possible Rules to Strengthen Our School Community instruct students to “keep their work space/school clean.” This is a similarity between the Great Law of Peace and the Possible Rules to Strengthen Our School Community.

  • Remind students that they have read and analyzed sections of the Great Law of Peace several times already. Encourage them to skim the document briefly and turn and talk with a partner about what they remember.

  • Ask students to write, then talk, about other similarities they notice between the two documents. Arrange the class into groups of three. Explain to the students that they will be recording similarities between the two documents on chart paper. Distribute blank chart paper to students.

  • Once the students have identified similarities between the two documents, ask: “How can highlighting these similarities help us create a school constitution?” Listen for responses such as: “If it helped the five tribes keep peace, and we listed it as a rule to keep peace at school, then it should probably be in our school constitution too.”

  • Remind the students: “Yesterday we added additional rules to make sure all our school problems were being solved. Likewise, the Great Law of Peace listed over 100 rules to solve any conflicts the 5 tribes might encounter. That means we can have as many rules as we need to help solve all our school problems.”

  • Explain to students that each small group will work on writing one of these rules as part of their constitution.

  • Optimize access to tools and assistive technologies such as tablets, AP systems, etc.

  • Use thoughtful grouping: Consider partnering an ELL with a student who speaks the same L1 when discussion of complex content is required. This can allow students to have more meaningful discussions and clarify points in their L1.




Work Time (continued)

Meeting Students’ Needs

    C. Drafting Our Part of the Constitution (20 minutes)

    • Problems that happen at school:

    • Rule/Law:

    • How this rule or law is a solution to help improve our school:

  • Give the students 2 to 3 minutes to look closely at the writing frame. Invite the students to share what they notice. (Listen for such statements as: “The frame asks us to name a problem occurring at school. We will write a rule to help prevent or solve the problem. We will explain how this rule helps to solve the problem at school.”)

  • Say to the students: “Let’s see if we can work together to create a part of our school constitution. What is the first part of the frame asking us to do?”

  • Invite one student to share: “The first part of the frame asks us to identify one problem that happens at school.” Call on another student to identify one problem. Prompt the student to answer in complete sentences. For example: “Students make messes and don’t throw garbage away, so our school gets dirty.” Record the students’ responses. Do not make any grammatical errors when recording the student’s response.

  • Continue to discuss aloud the process and what information belongs where to complete the sentence frame. Call on several students to explain what the remaining two parts of the frame are and what should be written.

  • Make sure the students feel confident in using the writing frame. Then partner students to work together to write a part of the constitution.

  • Assign a rule from the class’s list to each pair. This will ensure that each pair creates a different section of the constitution, and that there is no repetition or overlap.

  • Note: Remember to assign two of the stronger writers in the class to create the introduction to the constitution, as it is the most challenging part to write.

  • Ask students to begin drafting their section with their partner. Remind the students that the Possible Rules to Strengthen Our School Community will also be helpful when writing, as it will describe rules and strategies for solving problems. (For example, if students cite arguing in the classroom as a problem, then Entry 6 would be a rule to solve this problem.)

  • Monitor students during the writing time and offer assistance when needed.






Closing and Assessment

Meeting Students’ Needs

A. Debrief (5 minutes)

  • Invite students to discuss their writing process today. What went well? Did they feel challenged at times? How did their team work together? Invite a few students to share.



B. Exit Ticket (5 minutes)

  • Distribute index cards. Ask students to respond to the questions: “Is your part of the constitution, as it’s written today, ready to be presented to our school? If so, how do you know? If not, what else needs to be done?”

  • Give students time to write their response.

  • Glance over students’ responses for a quick assessment and to help you with planning for next learning needs.



Homework

Meeting Students’ Needs

  • For tonight’s homework, continue reading at your independent level at home.

    Note: Keep the Constitution writing frames for students to use in Lesson 6.






Grade 4: Module 1: Unit 3: Lesson 5

Supporting Materials




Constitution Writing Frame


Title:

One problem that happens at school:










Rule/Law:










How this rule or law is a solution to help improve our school:













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